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Treish

The ancient language of the Treil

The ancient language of the Treil. The language has been banned in The Country of Ildres since they began hunting the Treil. It is one of the official languages of The Republic of Halivaara together with Idrish and Edrean. It's one of the languages with the fewest native speakers though many of the humans and especially Half-breeds who flee to Halivaara also learn it. It was near extinction about 400 years ago, but has come back strong because the treil focused on teaching their children the language.

Spoken by
Geographic distribution
Halivaara

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Idioms

  The Treish language has lots of unique sayings and terms, due to the fact that the Treil have had their own isolated culture for many years. One of the things that are only seen in Treish, is the specific idioms they have. Most come from things they have seen in Halivaara after they were hunted and chose to flee from The Country of Ildres.  

The idioms are very important to the Treish language. It's more common to use an idiom than say what you want outright, as many find it more polite to do it in a light-hearted and joking manner. The Treish language is generally colourful and full of expressions that have ties to their values, traditions and general life. This can be seen in the idioms.

Saying
Meaning
Comes from
To drag the wolf by the tail Use unnecessary or unwarranted force in a situation Comes from the love for the tame Northern White-Wolf, where you can just call it and it will come running. There's no need to use force.
To fight the waves To waste time on something that will lead you nowhere. When you spend time on something that will fail. Comes from The War of Waves. You simply can't go to war with the ocean and win.
To have your tongue stuck to the pole Used when someone has nothing to say or can't seem to get the words out. Comes from the common knowledge that your tongue will be stuck to metal if you lick it in the winter.
To sit on an icicle To be uptight and tense. It would be very uncomfortable to sit on an icicle.
To step in yellow snow Often used when someone is in a bad mood. Someone could be moody because they stepped in a place where someone peed.


Cover image: by Ninne124

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