The Wanderers

The lands are ever changing; mountains will rise and fall, forests will burn and grow back again, the rivers will carve their way through the landscape. But in all this change there is but one true constant. The Wanderers will make every new place their home.
 
Wherever you go in Tosormi you can be sure of the fact that sooner or later you will meet a caravan of Wanderers. These the oldest people of the lands are more adaptable than any who have come later and have managed to spread to every corner of the continent, no matter how harsh. And here they live almost in the same way as they have done for generations.
 

History

 
No one knows when the Wanderers came to Tosormi. Some say they have always been here, and that might be true. They do not consider the land theirs, but rather they belong to it and are a part of it.
  When The Rooted came to Tosormi some 400 years ago it didn't take long for them to discover the new continent weren't so empty of people as they thought, but it also stood clear very fast that neither the Rooted or the Wanderers were aggressive people. The Rooted simply wanted land to build their villages, sow their crops and feed their animals, and since that was not something the Wanderers were very interested in, although they found the idea quite unnatural, they soon settled into their new roles as neighbours.   The arrival of the Rooted did change the Wanderers however. Even if they had always done some trading among each other and between the different group of Wanderers, they now also gained to role as traders and messengers between the different Rooted villages. In more densely populated places this is now the main livelihood of a lot of Wanderer groups, but for the most part the trading comes second to the hunting and herding that have supported the people for centuries.  

Different kind of Wanderers

 
Although generally seen as one single group of people both by outsiders and among themselves, there are certain bigger differences between groups of Wanderers in different places. However, the biggest difference between groups is how they make their livelihood.
 

The Xuis

Perhaps the most characteristic of the Wanderers are the beastmasters Xuis, named after their huge beasts that carry their whole lives. These enourmous herbivores are fitted with platforms on their back where the people build simple huts (known as Briri (ʙiri)) where they live and store their property. Their animals are sturdy and can travel for a long time without rest, eating from trees and bushes as they pass them. It is not unusual for the caravans to travel throughout the night.   Xuis tribes are those who most of all have turned to trading, crossing huge distances with their caravans. They trade both between their own nomadic clans and the settlements all over Tosormi, and work as a messenger system across the land. However they still rely heavily on hunting and gathering during their travels. Individuals and smaller groups usually go out with smaller, faster mounts so they can easily get back to the caravan even if it is on the move. Thanks to their function as messengers they are usually welcome everywhere.

The Herders

Across the huge fields in the southern-central parts of Tosormi, herds of grazing animals make their home. And where these animals go, the Herders will follow. Even though the animals are mostly still wild, they are being protected by the group of herders walking with them. They live in a symbiotic relationship where the Herders take care of injured animals and protect them from other predators, while taking older animals to feed themself and as a resource for almost everything in their lives.   The life of the Herders largely follow the animals. During the drier months in the summer and autumn, the animals come together in huge groups along the rivers and lakes where water is more secure, and thus the people come together as well. During this time they form bigger, more permanent settlements and usually spend a lot more time together, having large feasts to create stronger bonds between groups. As the rain comes back and fills up smaller water sources out in the fields the animals split up and head out, and their people follows.
   
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by Pexels

The Mountain people

When they say the Wanderers have managed to spread all of Tosormi, they mean all over. Even in the mountain range in the central parts of Tosormi, people make their home.   These people rely heavily on the seasons. During the warmer months they go high up in the mountains, hunting and gathering the sparce resources that do exist here. When the weather starts getting colder and the threat of snow storms get too real, they wander down to lower lands, and just like the Herders during the dry season they here form bigger settlements with other families.
 

Other groups

Of course there are a lot of families, groups, and tribes that don't clearly fall into any of these categories. These are Wanderers all over Tosormi who live their lives as hunters and gatherers, just trying to survive as best as they can.  

Diplomacy

Wanderers as a whole are very peaceful. The get along well with the farming outlanders and tend to be more open than suspicious to strangers. What fighting do occur is usually between family groups, when someone feel mistreated or insulted. Especially when gathered in larger settlements for extended periods of times there tend to be trouble just because there is a lot of people in the same place. Apart from the groups up in the northern arid areas, who have something resembling a justice system, fights and arguments are usually solved by asking the elder of a group that isn't involved in the fight to mediate the conflict.
Wanderers and Nature Most Wanderers live simple lives, spending most of their time gathering food and making crafts. They are dependent on nature for everything and revere it, something that is evident in every part of their culture. Their religion, even if it varies a bit from place to place as religions do, focuses heavily on the nature and animals around them, featuring a lot of spirits and higher beings that have abilites to control the world. However, Wanderers place a great bit of responsibility on themselves for taking care of nature as well, and taking more than you need of anything is seen as a great sin.
 
Leaving Home Since Wanderers mostly live in small family groups, finding a partner withing the group is both impractical and taboo. Instead, it is custom that when a man comes of age (which in reality often mean when he and his parents agree that it is time), he leaves for another group, often during times when lots of groups settle down in an area together for a while. A young man can sometimes switch between different groups several times during his youth, but just until he fathers a child. When a child is made the man is seen as belonging to that family now and will stay with the group. The only exception to this is if the man loses his children and partner/-s; he is then allowed to leave the group as part of his mourning, although it is not something he has to do.
 
Children Most Wanderer groups are not very strict on monogamy, although this varies, and both men and women are allowed to have multiple partners within the group. A childs parents are expected to have the ultimate responsibility for the child, but in reality all children in a group are raised communily. This is mostly of convenience, so able adults aren't tied up with caring for children when they could be out getting food for everyone. The groups elders generally stay in camp with children, with breastfeeding women help each other out to feed their young while still being able to go out of camp for a little bit. Outsiders often think of Wanderer groups as very messy and disorganized, but in fact groups tend to keep excellent spoken record of exactly who is related to who, how old they are etc. It helps that most Wanderer women only have three to four children on average.

Languages spoken


Cover image: by Vertixico

Comments

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Master Redclaw123
Elias Redclaw
3 Mar, 2020 17:25

Finally an article by Etalia! I really loved how thid was written and it really starts to give off an epic vibe for the world of Tosormi. I am interested indeed to know more about these folks! A bit short on time rn so sadly can"t go deeper into what i liked but i sure have some feedback for you! 1) I really want to know what the wanderers look like. Do they differ in appearance according to their group?   2) Do the various wanderer groups interact with each other somehow? Have there been ever any attempts to unify them under a single banner?   3) Are there professional soldiers for guarding wanderer groups? Who supplies them? Where do they get the materials for weapons and armor from?   4) What are some cultural practices of the wanderers? Any special festivals or holidays?   In additon, i do have some formatting help but do note that this is a very personal nitpick and you"re free to discars this advice :D   1) It would be good to get a music video to listen to whilst reading this article. Perhaps something related with the theme 2) Some more images for how the wanderers may look like or some pics of the environements they live in within their respective headers 3) There are some ultra micro small grammatical mistakes here and there but they don"t detract at all from the reading experience so you"re fine there!   In conclusion, i can only say that i am giddily excited for Tosormi! It sounds like an incredibly amazing world and for some reason gives me a vibe of James Camerons Avatar. I would really love to see more of it! Congrats eta and keep up the amazing work! :)

12 Jun, 2020 20:29

Another great article. Let's see what feedback I can come up with this time:  

Design

  Once again, my biggest critique is the sidebar. You should probably either switch the header-text to use --Phrase::Key-- like the following information or split it into a container like I had suggested for the previous article that I read.   Technically, I will also implore you to use containers, alouds, and quotes more as it adds interest but that takes practice to get used to.   (Small thing I also noticed: You should maybe add a caption to the image in your "Types of Wanderers" section to even out the columns)  

Grammar

 
The lands are ever changing; mountains will rise and fall, forests will burn and grow back again, the rivers will carve their way through the landscape.
— Opening Quote
  The sentence following the semicolon doesn't work as there is no clear structure of clauses. There are two possible solutions: 1. switch the semicolon to a colon and turn the commas into semicolons(not advised) or 2. add an "and" before the rivers segment(advised).  
And here they live almost in the same way as they have done for generations.
— Opening Paragraph
  The general rule of thumb that I've come up with for opening a sentence with a coordinating conjunction is that you shouldn't ever do it, especially with and, unless it's dialogue as people speak that way, but it has no place in formal writing.  
Some say they have always been here, and that might be true. They do not consider the land theirs, but rather they belong to it and are a part of it.
— History
  Explaining why this is weird is a bit hard, but, from what I can tell, the first sentence included is almost a sentence fragment. I would rewrite it as follows: "Some say they have always been here, and that might be true, but they do not consider the land theirs. Rather they belong to the land and are a part of it." That flows a bit better and has two full sentences.  
The Farmers simply wanted land to build their villages, sow their crops and feed their animals, and since that was not something the Wanderers were very interested in, although they found the idea quite unnatural, they soon settled into their new roles as neighbours.
— History
  The last item on the list doesn't quite work and creates a whole bunch of tangential problems. Firstly, "since that was not something the Wanderers were very interested in" should have a comma before it as well. Secondly, this shouldn't be written so much as a list since the third item isn't an item. I would suggest writing something along the lines of the following: "The Farmers simply wanted land to build their villages, sow their crops, and feed their animals; since that was not something the Wanderers were very interested in, finding the concept quite unnatural, they soon settled into their new roles as neighbours."  
The arrival of the Farmers did change the Wanderers however.
— History
  However is conjunctive adverb, and such should have commas either side of it when placed in text. "Wanderers, however."  
In more densely populated places this is now the main livelihood of a lot of Wanderer groups, but for the most part the trading comes second to the hunting and herding that have supported the people for centuries.
— History
  "for the most part" is an appositive and, therefore, should be wrapped in commas.  
These enourmous herbivores are fitted with platforms on their back where the people build simple huts (known as Briri (ʙiri)) where they live and store their property.
— The Xuis
  This seems to border on a run-on sentence. You should probably explain the purpose of the Briri in a following sentence rather than the same one.  
They trade both between different Wanderer groups and the Farmers
— The Xuis
  You overcomplicated this sentence a bit. You could easily simplify it down to "They trade with different Wanderer groups and the Farmers.  
And where these animals go, the Herders will follow.
— The Herders
  It's back. "And." Just remove the word "and," and you've got yourself a good sentence.  
hunting and gathering the sparce resources that do exist here.
— The Mountain People
  "Here" seems like it almost breaks third person. You don't have any specification of what "here" is before stating it, so it's really out of place.  
When the weather starts getting colder and the threat of snow storms get too real, they wander down to lower lands, and just like the Herders during the dry season they here form bigger settlements with other families.
— The Mountain People
  A few different problems here. Firsty, the comma before "and" should be moved to after it. "just like the Herders during the dry season" should also have a comma after, assuming you moved the "and" comma to before it. Additionally, "they here form" doesn't work in the slightest due to contradicting subjects, which can be fixed by saying "here they form" to solidify the content to one subject.  
which in reality often mean when he and his parents agree that it is time
— Leaving Home
  "in reality" should be wrapped in quotes as it's an appositive. "mean" should also be switched to "means"  
The only exception to this is if the man loses his children and partner/-s
— Leaving Home
  The /-s might be right depending on where you come from, but, from what I've seen, when referring to one or multiple things it would be written as "partner(s)".  
A childs parents are expected to have the ultimate responsibility for the child, but in reality all children in a group are raised communily.
— Children
  "childs" should be "child's" and "in reality" should be wrapped in commas like before.  
The groups elders generally stay in camp with children
— Children
  "groups" should be written "group's"  
Wanderers as a whole are very peaceful.
— Diplomacy
  "as a whole" is technically an appositive and, thus, should have commas either side.  

Content

 
Even in the dry regions on the eastern peninsula there are Wanderers to be found.
— The Nomads of the Arids
  The previous section starts almost exactly the same which makes it feel slightly repetitive.  
Their religion, even if it varies a bit from place to place as religions do, focuses heavily on the nature and animals around them, featuring a lot of spirits and higher beings that have abilites to control the world.
— Wanderers and Nature
  This feels like animism, which you might want to mention in here as a key term regarding their religious beliefs   It's overall a very interesting article. There is a lot of detail about the people that you are describing and it does well to set a scene. Great work here, yet again. I'm not great at nitpicking content, so, from what I can see, it feels fairly well fleshed out. The only thing that seems to be missing is the inclusion of culture and traditions within the Wanderers.   One last additional note, sorry if the feedback slowly got worse. I was losing focus a bit, but I think I still managed to hit most of the points home.

Give me a visit at my current project(s): Aesontis
Journeyman Sloqush
Sloqush the Sloqush
12 Jun, 2020 22:24

An interesting article, so let's get right into the feedback.  

Spelling and Grammar

  Jacob already provided extensive feedback for this point, so I will try to keep it brief.  
the new continent weren't so   ~ History
  I would place a "that" before "the new..." to improve the reading flow. Also "wasn't" instead of "weren't"-  
nature as well, and taking more than you   ~ Wanderers and Nature
  I would alter the sentence in the following way to better convey the reason as to why the Wanderers view "taking too much" as a sin; "nature, therefore taking more than..."  
Perhaps the most characteristic of   ~ The Xuis
  most characteristic/archetypical "group" of  
Wanderers is the beastmasters Xuis   ~ The Xuis
  Maybe switch it around to "the Xuis beastmasters". also "are" instead of "is"  
threat of snow storms get too real   ~ The Mountain people
  "gets" instead of "get"  
The get along well with   ~ Diplomacy
  "They" instead of "the"  

Article Structure

  As Jacob already said, quotes and the liberal utilization of the "Enter" would go a long way to improve the structure of the article, as the "text walls" especially the ones in the sidebar notably interfere with the article's readability.  

Content

  A nice, well fleshed out article about different groups of peaceful nomadic people.   Something that would be nice to add/link would be an article about the various beasts of the Xuis, as their primary carriers sound like very interesting creatures given that the can carry entire huts on their back for extended periods of time and are furthermore also nocturnal/ can see in the dark. Also if the caravan is traveling through the night, who exactly is "driving" the animals and how are they able to see the way?   Something else that I was wondering about, was the fact that you mentioned that men and woman can have multiple different partners, yet given that the Wanderers usually live in small family groups and the average number of children per woman is 3 to 4, I would assume that there aren't that many possible partners anyway.   Or does the polygamy stuff only happen during the larger gatherings of the Herders and Mountain people; as well as in the desert people's city?  

Sloqush's random suggestions

  A thing I personally really like to do is to add a "Theme Song" for each of my species/nations in order to help to convey the mood of the article. I currently can't really think of a song that would fit the Wanderers, I used Mongolian throat singing for my nomadic people, but I think that would really fit here.   Also here is a small quote that I came up with while reading the article, feel free to use it :)  
When leaves fall and herds wander, we shall meet again.

Explore Sloqush's bleakdark sandox: Cenorad
12 Jun, 2020 22:46

First reaction: I really like the quote. It does a wonderful job of setting the stage and a sense of mood. It gives me an idea of the Wanderers, right away.   Second reaction is that they do seem to fall a bit into the Roma archetype that we see occasionally in fantasy (specifically the caravanes makes me think about the WoT ones). Nothing more than something to be aware of and keep in mind! :)  

Wherever you go in Tosormi you can be sure of the fact that sooner or later you will meet a caravan of Wanderers.
  There's a few changes you could make here!   I'd considering putting a comma after Tosormi and consider removing "of the fact".  
These the oldest people of the lands are more adaptable than any who have come later and have managed to spread to every corner of the continent, no matter how harsh.
  "These the" seem like a typo, or the sentence structure it a bit hard to follow.   Consider doing a bit of a tweak there: maybe "They are the oldest people of the land, adaptable and hardy. Wanderers have found homes in every corner of [continent name], no matter how inhospitable", for example.  
And here they live almost in the same way as they have done for generations.
  The sentence reads a little akward; I would consider just rephrasing it a bit. It's the "And here they live almost" that's kind of clunky!  
HISTORY
  Usually, I like to have a more extended overview about the thing I'm reading about before getting to the history, but it works here. Great stuff :)  
No one knows when the Wanderers came to Tosormi. Some say they have always been here, and that might be true.
  Do the Wanderers know? What do they say on the matter?  
They do not consider the land theirs, but rather they belong to it and are a part of it.
  This line is also just a little clunky, but is a very interesting idea. A bit elf-y!   Maybe consider just tightening up again, tweaking the last end a bit.  
When the Farmers came to Tosormi some 400 years ago it didn't take long for them to discover the new continent weren't so empty of people as they thought, but it also stood clear very fast that neither the Farmers or the Wanderers were aggressive people.
  At 46 words, this sentence is pretty big!   I would consider splitting it in two. There's also some minor alterations you could do; 1. Add a comma after "ago" 2. "stood clear very fast" is a bit wordy. Consider shortening it into a singular, more punchy word "it was immediately clear that neither were".. for example! 3. Weren't = wasn't?  
The Farmers simply wanted land to build their villages, sow their crops and feed their animals, and since that was not something the Wanderers were very interested in, although they found the idea quite unnatural, they soon settled into their new roles as neighbours.
  This is another really long sentence, and it's a unusual that it didn't lead to conflict - but if you are going for a more bright, optimistic fantasy setting, it totally works and I dig it!   However, at 44 words, it's definitely long! I would definitely split it into 2 sentences.   But I do like the more optimistic feel I'm getting from the setting through this!  
The arrival of the Farmers did change the Wanderers however. Even if they had always done some trading among each other and between the different group of Wanderers, they now also gained to role as traders and messengers between the different Farming villages. In more densely populated places this is now the main livelihood of a lot of Wanderer groups, but for the most part the trading comes second to the hunting and herding that have supported the people for centuries.
  I like how the context and contact between these two factions is developing, but I think there's a few things here that could help maybe! There's some nitpicky things first:   1. Maybe consider a comma before the first however 2. Consider changing the "even if they had always" to maybe "though they had always" 3. "done some trading among each other and between the different group of Wanderers" this part is unclear and a bit confusing - who are "each other" if not different groups of wanderers? Do you mean tribes? Either way, you can probably condense it a bit! 4. "they now also gained to role" the role? 5. "In more densely populated places this is now the main livelihood of a lot of Wanderer groups," maybe consider a comma after places   And the big feedback -   I'd love to know more about what they get out of this. What are the goods that the Farmers produce that the nomads want? What have each side really gotten over the other? Is there anything in particular the farmers want or the wanderers want? :)   It is a rich field of fiction to explore and one that can do a lot of storytelling about the setting and the context of these two factions!  
The Xuis
  These guys sound really cool, but there's a bit of a lack of detail here! What do their big mounts look like, besides big?   What are their small mounts?   Why did they take to trading more than the other groups?  

Side Panel

  Your paragraphs on the side panel are pretty chunky and I would consider breaking them up into two paragraphs each. Adding some pictures or quotes would also help break up the flow of text with something interesting.  

Questions

  I do still have some questions after reading the article, which I think may be some good material to expand the article with, if you so chose. :)   1. Are there any formal relations between the different tribes? Alliances, agreements regarding terrain? Is there ever any conflict about that? Do members from different tribes marry each other or move into different tribes?   2. What's the societal movement like between Farmers and Wanderers? Are there ever any Farmers who decide they'd like to join the Wanderers and if so how does that process look? Are they stigmatized, tested, or just accepted?   In the same vein, what about a wanderer who wishes to join a city or village?   3. How do they defend themselves? What kind of weapons do they use and how do they organize their militia? Even if it isn't against farmers or bandits (as such conflicts may or may not exist in your setting), what about hungry rabid giant honey badgers?   4. You mention the elder at one point, but there's not much information about their cultural structure - what are the different roles in a wanderer group or tribe? Are there shamans, priests, war leaders, and so on? :)   5. What kind of stuff do they use? What kind of industries do they have? This ties into the question too about what they sell to farmers and what they buy in turn. Do they have a middle class of essentially craftsmen, or do they entirely lack metal tools?   The article starts really strong and I'm digging the more light-hearted vibe I got from it so far. There'll be paralels drawn to the colonization of the Americas, which is something to just be aware and careful about, but I'm sure you got that figured out already!   Great stuff, Eta! :D