Elusah

Elusah meaning Voice of Songs in Elvish was considered the mother tongue of the Elves long before their arrival in Dageth as refugees after the collapse of the Unified Elven Empire. The language, itself, was said to almost sound like music, and all Elves spoke it to signify their unity. The only problem was that the language was hard to understand for those who did not speak it. It was also difficult to read as complex letters could only be deciphered by the Elves, themselves.

A language Lost

  Though the Elusah would be still be used by the Elves for a time when they were still a unified people on the Dageth, the discovery of magic and what would lead to the War of Light and Dark and the event that would lead to the Awakening would see an end to it. With the Elves being divided into different species from the magic that they once tried to control and the stopping of their immortality caused them to scatter across the land with the ancient Elves that lived for millennia dying out the newer generations began to alter it to suit their need with much of the original dialect being lost to say a select few and much of its writing from conflicts that would push them farther away from their past.  

Unreadable Texts

  Due to Elusah being no longer used by anyone anymore anything that has been written down in the language is considered unreadable. Which is even more frustrating to Humans in the Western Lands as any knowledge that the Elves had left behind has been lost to the ages to them with what little they could find. The Elves themselves have had trouble as well as the writing in their language has become difficult to understand as their alphabets have changed tremendously cause them to lose whatever knowledge lost to them as well as very few people can even write it anymore.    

Natively known as: Elusah /ˈɣlʊhviːŋks/

  ...and he stood holding his hat and turned his wet face to the wind... mēyy kwū dfūnflō zēb sō lyīlk mēyy kmikō sō syōsp kindz bwenk yo Pronunciation: /meːjj kwuː ˈdfuːnfloː zæːb soː ljiːlk meːjj ˈkmɪkoː soː sjoːsp kɪndz bwænk jɔ/ Gluhvīngksian word order: and he stood holding hat his and turned his face wet the wind to  

Spelling & Phonology

  Consonant inventory: /b d f h j k l m n p s t v w z ð ŋ ɣ θ/  
↓Manner/Place→BilabialLabiodentalDentalAlveolarPalatalVelarGlottal
Nasalmnŋ
Stopp bt dk
Fricativef vθ ðs zɣh
Approximantj
Lateral approximantl
    Co-articulated phonemes  
↓Manner/Place→Labial-velar
Approximantw
    Vowel inventory: /a aː eː iː oː uː æ æː ɔ ɪ ʊ/  
FrontBack
High
Near-highɪʊ
High-mid
Low-midɔ
Near-lowæː æ
Lowa aː
    Syllable structure: (C)(C)(C)V(C)(C)(C) Stress pattern: No fixed stress Word initial consonants: b, bl, bn, bw, d, df, dl, dv, dvj, fl, hj, j, k, kh, kl, km, kn, ks, kst, kw, lj, m, mj, ml, n, nj, nw, pj, pl, s, sj, sl, sn, sw, th, tm, tsv, tv, v, vj, vl, vn, vw, w, z, zj, zn, zw, ð, ŋ, ŋw, ɣ, ɣl, θ, θl Mid-word consonants: b, bd, bl, bst, bt, bvj, bw, d, dkw, dl, dn, ds, f, fd, ff, fk, fl, fp, fst, ftl, ftw, fw, h, hb, hd, hl, hv, hw, j, jb, jdn, jf, jj, jk, jsk, jt, jvj, jz, k, kb, kd, kj, kkj, kkw, kn, ksf, ksj, ksk, ksm, ksp, kst, ksw, ktf, ktl, kts, kv, l, lb, ld, ldf, ldh, ldl, ldn, lf, lfd, lfm, lft, lkj, llv, lmn, lp, lpf, lpl, lsh, lsk, lst, lt, ltj, lts, ltz, lv, lð, lθ, m, mbj, mbl, mfl, mft, mnd, mp, mpf, mpj, mpl, mpt, ms, mst, n, nb, nbl, nd, ndb, ndf, ndj, ndk, ndl, ndm, ndn, nds, ndt, ndz, nf, nfj, nfl, nj, nkj, nkl, nkt, nkw, nlj, nm, nmj, nnj, npj, npl, ns, nsf, nsj, nsk, nsl, nsm, nsp, nst, ntb, ntf, nth, ntj, ntk, ntl, ntm, nts, ntv, ntw, nzl, nzp, nð, nɣ, nθj, nθl, p, pk, pl, plw, pn, ppl, ps, psj, pst, pw, pz, s, sb, sd, sf, sh, skj, skl, skv, sp, spj, spl, st, stf, stj, stk, stl, stm, stn, stv, stw, sz, sθ, t, tb, tbl, td, tlm, tm, ts, tsd, tsj, tsm, tst, tth, tts, tv, tw, tz, v, vd, vl, w, wk, wl, ws, wts, wv, ww, z, zb, zd, zdv, zh, zk, zm, zn, zp, zv, zz, ð, ðst, ŋ, ŋb, ŋd, ŋh, ŋkf, ŋkj, ŋkl, ŋkn, ŋkt, ŋkw, ŋkθ, ŋl, ŋm, ŋmj, ŋn, ŋtj, ŋts, ŋɣn, ɣ, θ, θd, θkw, θw Word final consonants: b, bb, d, ft, fts, jd, jj, jl, js, jt, kt, kts, l, ldz, lk, ll, lps, lpt, ls, lt, lts, lθ, m, mp, mpf, mps, mpt, ms, mt, mz, n, ndd, ndl, nds, ndz, nf, nk, nkt, ns, nt, ntl, nts, nv, nz, p, pp, pt, pts, s, sks, skt, sp, spt, st, sts, t, tt, v, vd, w, wf, ws, z, zd, zt, ðd, ŋ, ŋd, ŋk, ŋks, ŋkt, ŋkθ, ŋn, ŋt, ŋz, ɣ, θ   Phonological changes (in order of application):  
  • p → f / V_V
  • {m,n} → ŋ / _k
  • s → ʂ / _t
  • {m,n} → ŋ / _k
  Spelling rules:  
PronunciationSpelling
æe
ɪi
ɔo
ʊu
jy
ŋng
ɣg
θth
ðdh
V₁ːV₁̄
   

Grammar

  Main word order: Subject Verb Object (Prepositional phrase). "Mary opened the door with a key" turns into Mary opened the door with a key. Adjective order: Adjectives are positioned after the noun. Adposition: postpositions  

Nouns

 
SingularNo affix dfīi /dfiːˈɪ/ dog
PluralIf starts with vowel: Prefix w- Else: Prefix weː- wēdfīi /ˈweːdfiːɪ/ dogs
   

Articles

 
Definitezyom /zjɔm/ the
Indefinitedvō /dvoː/ a, some
    Uses of definite article that differ from English:
  • Used to talk about countable nouns in general: English’s ‘I like cats’ would translate to ‘I like the cats’
  • Used with place names: ‘The London’
  Uses of indefinite article that differ from English:
  • Not used for non-specific countable nouns: non-specific means ‘I am looking for a (any) girl in a red dress’, whereas specific means ‘I am looking for a (particular) girl in a red dress’
  • Not used for non-specific mass (uncountable) nouns: non-specific means ‘Would you like some (any) tea?’ whereas specific means ‘Some tea (a specific amount) fell off the truck’
 

Pronouns

 
1st singulargīs /ɣiːs/ I, me, mine
2nd singulardvye /dvjæ/ you, yours
3rd singular masckwū /kwuː/ he, him, his, it, its
3rd singular fema /a/ she, her, hers, it, its
1st plural inclusivenuz /nʊz/ we (including you), us (including you), ours (including you)
1st plural exclusivemyēnts /mjeːnts/ we (excluding you), us (excluding you), ours (excluding you)
2nd pluralsli /slɪ/ you all, yours (pl)
3rd pluralhyi /hjɪ/ they, them, theirs
   

Possessive determiners

 
1st singularzē /zæː/ my
2nd singularwēw /weːw/ your
3rd singular mascsō /soː/ his
3rd singular femwēngt /weːŋt/ her
1st plural inclusivesli /slɪ/ our (including you)
1st plural exclusiveflē /flæː/ our (excluding you)
2nd pluralyā /jaː/ your (pl)
3rd plural /iː/ their
   

Verbs

 
SingularPlural
PresentPrefix ɪ- ikans /ˈɪkans/ (I/you/he/she) learns Prefix pjæ- pyekans /pjæˈkans/ (we/they) learn
PastPrefix aː- ākans /ˈaːkans/ (I/you/he/she) learned If starts with vowel: Prefix lj- Else: Prefix ljuː- lyūkans /ˈljuːkans/ (we/they) learned
Remote pastIf starts with vowel: Prefix th- Else: Prefix tha- thakans /ˈthakans/ (I/you/he/she) learned (long ago) If starts with vowel: Prefix v- Else: Prefix vɔ- vokans /vɔˈkans/ (we/they) learned (long ago)
FuturePrefix ða- dhakans /ðaˈkans/ (I/you/he/she) will learn Prefix njaː- nyākans /njaːˈkans/ (we/they) will learn
   

Numbers

  Gluhvīngksian has a base-20 number system:   1 - kstēnts 2 - myēnts 3 - blō 4 - ingkwī 5 - vwā 6 - slo 7 - kwō 8 - ki 9 - tve 10 - bwe 11 - kingdi 12 - sōng 13 - āngt 14 - web 15 - thongktandz 16 - ivd 17 - zunthya 18 - istha 19 - myaldz 20 - yoms 21 - yomskstēnts “twenty-one” 400 - kstēnts ātthenfē “one fourhundred” 401 - kstēnts ātthenfē kstēnts “one fourhundred one” 800 - myēnts ātthenfē “two fourhundred” 8000 - kstēnts klīngk “one eightthousand”  

Derivational morphology

  Adjective → adverb = If starts with vowel: Prefix v- Else: Prefix vɔ- Adjective → noun (the quality of being [adj]) = Prefix vɔ- Adjective → verb (to make something [adj]) = Prefix eː- Noun → adjective (having the quality of [noun]) = If starts with vowel: Prefix w- Else: Prefix wæ- Noun → adjective relating to noun (e.g. economy → economic) = If starts with vowel: Prefix ð- Else: Prefix ða- Noun to verb = If starts with vowel: Prefix ɣ- Else: Prefix ɣiː- Verb → adjective (result of doing [verb]) = If starts with vowel: Prefix mj- Else: Prefix mja- Tending to = If starts with vowel: Prefix ɣ- Else: Prefix ɣiː- Verb → noun (the act of [verb]) = If starts with vowel: Prefix pl- Else: Prefix pluː- Verb → noun that verb produces (e.g. know → knowledge) = If starts with vowel: Prefix d- Else: Prefix doː- One who [verb]s (e.g. paint → painter) = Prefix a- Place of (e.g. wine → winery) = Prefix slɪ- Diminutive = Prefix ɔ- Augmentative = Prefix næː-

Geographical Distribution

The language was primaly used by the Elves when they were once one people before the fall of the Unified Elven Empire with all speaking it
Spoken by

Cover image: An Elvish text by Alexandre

Comments

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Journeyman N4th
James Slaven
23 Feb, 2021 12:34

Wow! This is amazingly in-depth. Good job!

Journeyman N4th
James Slaven
23 Feb, 2021 12:38

I think the only other feedback I can give is that there's a few grammatical errors that can be quickly corrected (take the first paragraph as an example):   Elusah meaning Voice of Songs in Elvish was considered the mother tongue of the Elves long before before their arrival in Dageth as refugees after the collapse of the Unified Elven Empire. The language, itself, was said to almost sound like music, and all Elves spoke it to signify their unity. The only problem was that the language was hard to understand for those who did not speak it. It was also difficult to read as complex letters could only be deciphered by the Elves, themselves.   Really interesting article.

23 Feb, 2021 21:15

Really well thought out! You just upped the game by a lot :p Got some new ideas to expand my own languages as well now :)