Material Template

Things to Make More Things

This template can be used for any kind of material found in your world. This can range from the base elements, which make up atoms, up to magical metals like mithril.   The example used in this template is the real-world element neon, but this is just one very specific use of this template!  
The template has many prompt boxes which can be filled in. Use them for inspiration and to help format your article. Do not feel like you have to fill out all of them!
  The terms in the braces below each heading tell you under which tab this prompt appears and what the title of the box is.

Properties

Material Characteristics

(PROPERTIES > PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS)
Describe the material's look and basic characteristics. What kind of color and texture does it have? How does its surface feel when touched? Does it have a smell? Try to be evocative to create an image in the reader's head or support your description with an image!  
Neon is a chemical element with the symbol Ne and atomic number 10. It is a noble gas. Neon is a colorless, odorless, inert monatomic gas under standard conditions, with about two-thirds the density of air.
— Wikipedia

Physical & Chemical Properties

(PROPERTIES > PROPERTIES)
Describe what happens when this material comes into contact with other materials. How does it react when in water or heated? Does something happen when a person comes into contact with it? Alternatively, detail the specific physical and chemical properties of this material.  
Neon is the second-lightest noble gas, after helium. It glows reddish-orange in a vacuum discharge tube. Also, neon has the narrowest liquid range of any element: from 24.55 to 27.05 K (−248.45 °C to −245.95 °C, or −415.21 °F to −410.71 °F). It has over 40 times the refrigerating capacity (per unit volume) of liquid helium and three times that of liquid hydrogen. In most applications, it is a less expensive refrigerant than helium.
— Wikipedia

Compounds

(PROPERTIES > COMPOUNDS)
What are the specific compounds of this material? Is it made up of molecules? Of another material? Is it a mix of several different materials?

Geology & Geography

(PROPERTIES > GEOLOGY / GEOGRAPHY)
The geological or geographical location of this material. Can it only be found deep underground? Does it only grow in a specific region ? Describe the conditions this material requires to exist!

Origin & Source

(PROPERTIES > ORIGIN)
Where does this material come from? Can It be harvested from the ground in the form of a mineral? Is it grown by an animal or plant ? Is it only available in dangerous places?  
Stable isotopes of neon are produced in stars. Neon's most abundant isotope 20Ne (90.48%) is created by the nuclear fusion of carbon and carbon in the carbon-burning process of stellar nucleosynthesis. This requires temperatures above 500 megakelvins, which occur in the cores of stars of more than 8 solar masses.
— Wikipedia

Life & Expiration

(PROPERTIES > HALF LIFE / DETERIORATION / EXPIRATION)
Some materials are not stable in their current form. What happens to it as it deteriorates? Does it always expire or are the certain conditions under which it remains stable? Can its life be extended?

History & Usage

History

(USAGE > HISTORY)
Materials usually have a history on how it was used in the past and how these uses change over time. Use this section to give a small summary of this history. Use a timelines and historical events to expand on it when it's important!

Discovery

(USAGE > DISCOVERY)
When was this material discovered? Was it discovered by a specific person or a team? Was it theorized before its discovery or was it really just a byproduct of another experiment?  
Neon was discovered in 1898 by the British chemists Sir William Ramsay (1852–1916) and Morris W. Travers (1872–1961) in London. Neon was discovered when Ramsay chilled a sample of air until it became a liquid, then warmed the liquid and captured the gases as they boiled off. The gases nitrogen, oxygen, and argon had been identified, but the remaining gases were isolated in roughly their order of abundance, in a six-week period beginning at the end of May 1898. First to be identified was krypton. The next, after krypton had been removed, was a gas which gave a brilliant red light under spectroscopic discharge. This gas, identified in June, was named "neon", the Greek analogue of the Latin novum ('new') suggested by Ramsay's son. The characteristic brilliant red-orange color emitted by gaseous neon when excited electrically was noted immediately. Travers later wrote: "the blaze of crimson light from the tube told its own story and was a sight to dwell upon and never forget."
— Wikipedia

Everyday use

(USAGE > COMMON USE)
What are its common uses? Use this if it can be used in everyday life. Who uses it? Is it limited to a specific ethnic group or only used in specific areas of your world?

Cultural Significance and Usage

(USAGE > CULTURAL SIGNIFICANCE AND USAGE)
Is the material used in specific rituals or traditions ? Does it have special meaning to a culture within your world?

Industrial Use

(USAGE > INDUSTRIAL USE)
Is this material used in an industrial or manufacturing process? Describe this process and how the material achieves the desired effect. Can it be used to help the creation of better alloys?

Refinement

(USAGE > REFINEMENT)
Before using this material does it need a refinement process? Are there special tools or rituals involved in this process?

Manufacturing & Products

(USAGE > MANUFACTURING / PRODUCTS)
What products or items are manufactured with this material? Describe these products and the process to make them. Or just link item or material articles about them.  
Neon is often used in signs and produces an unmistakable bright reddish-orange light. Although tube lights with other colors are often called "neon", they use different noble gases or varied colors of fluorescent lighting.
— Wikipedia

Byproducts & Sideproducts

(USAGE > BYPRODUCTS & SIDEPRODUCTS)
In many manufacturing processes, a number of secondary materials can be created. Some of these are considered waste while sometimes they are re-used for something else. In certain processes, these byproducts are hazardous or bad for the environment.

Hazards

(USAGE > HAZARDS)
Is this material hazardous to the people using it? Does it have a negative effect on the health of people coming into contact with it? Is it deadly even?

Enviromental Impact

(USAGE > ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT)
What is the environmental impact of this material? Can it destroy the natural world? Does it just pile up and become a hazard to animals and plants? Is it poisonous?

Reusability & Recycling

(USAGE > REUSABILITY & RECYCLING)
Can this material be re-used or even recycled? What is the process used to recycle this material? For what purpose is it re-used after it has become waste?

Distribution

Trade & Market

(DISTRIBUTION > TRADE & MARKET)
Where can this material be bought? Who trades with it? Is it commonly available or only from specialists? Is its supply limited or does it fit the demand?  
Neon, as liquid or gas, is relatively expensive – for small quantities, the price of liquid neon can be more than 55 times that of liquid helium. Driving neon's expense is the rarity of neon, which, unlike helium, can only be obtained from air.
— Wikipedia

Storage

(DISTRIBUTION > STORAGE)
How is this material stored? Describe special technologies or infrastructure to store and transport this material. Does it have to be stored in a secure location because of its value? Is it stored in a different state than it's used? Is there a location (building) within your world where this material is stored?

Law & Regulation

(DISTRIBUTION > LAW & REGULATION)
Are there any laws and regulations which limit the use and distribution of this material? Who enacts and who enforces these laws & regulations? Who ignores them? What is the punishment for possessing this material? What is the punishment for distributing it?

10NE

20.1797(6)
Material Types
Biomaterial
Ceramic
Composite
Concrete
Electronic
Elemental / Molecular
Glass
Livestock
Metal
Metaphysical
Metamaterial
Nanomaterial
Organic
Ore/Mineral
Optic
Polymer
Plastic
Semiconductor
Stone
Textile
Wood
Type
Elemental / Molecular
Value
100$ / m3
Rarity
extremely rare
Odor
odorless
Taste
tasteless
Color
colorless gas exhibiting an orange-red glow when placed in an electric field
Boiling / Condensation Point
27,15 K (−246 °C)
Melting / Freezing Point
24,56 K (−248,59 °C)
Density
0.9002 g/L
Common State
gas
Related Locations
Related Species
Related Items
Related Technologies
Related Professions

Related Prompts

The prompts listed below are part of the Worldbuilding Prompts that can be found under the Community menu. These prompts use the template discussed in this article. Using these prompts is a great way to expand your worldbuilding!
 
 
Mentioned Templates


Cover image: Photo by Heinrich Pniok

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