Fìrinne Myth in Outspoken | World Anvil

Fìrinne

The God of the Moon, Illusion, and Truth

"Swear to me by Fìrinne’s eye ye didn’t take it, scoundrel!"
— A Flustered Shopkeep to a Lying Pickpocket

Summary


Also known as Cal's Eye, Fìrinne is both feared and beloved by all. With the power to confound and confuse or to comfort and set right, this great light in the night sky is the perfect display of the duality of their parent, Cal. Fìrinne may come across as serine, or even whimsical, but those that take them as patron must beware their fierceness as the beloved spouse of Raidhse.

To earn Fìrinne's scorn is to bring Raidhse's mighty war hammer down on everything you love, and such a grudge is not easily appeased, even in death. It is Fìrinne's power of illusion that makes a dishonorable afterlife in the darkness below such a horrifying possibility.

Worship and Ritual


When devastation strikes by night, it is said to be Fìrinne's curse -- and a dreadful thing that curse is. Many believe that the only way to lift Fìrinne's curse is to make a sacrifice of your own blood to Raidhse and an offering of your deepest, darkest truth to Fìrinne. Then, you must sleep naked under the moon for one full cycle.

Fìrinne's light is said to be cleansing of all things, able to see through false illusions and bring out truth. It is from this belief that the use of the stockade arose -- in years gone by, it was believed that an unrepentant liar would be swallowed by the darkness.

It is common practice for followers of Fìrinne to take a vow of honesty, pledging themselves to the cruelest fate of all should they falter. The practice of deguthing comes from the first followers of Fìrinne. (See: Deordhan.)


by Luca on Unsplash

See Also

The Many Gods of Èirigh: A Religious Primer
Myth | Dec 28, 2021

A brief overview of the spiritual practices of Èirigh.



Cover image: by Mohamed Nohassi on Unsplash

Comments

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Dec 31, 2021 17:32 by TC

Another excellent god! I love the themes surrounding them. Are all your gods referred to with they/them pronouns? And if yeah, is there a particular reason for this?

Creator of Arda Almayed