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Sedivermeric

Appearing as a dry, gritty somewhat porous stone, dark golden brown in color. It absorbs water readily and forms a slurry when rubbed. Typically pulverised and used as an additive to grow media and soil beds for plant production.   It can be found in circular, meandering veins below ground in the open desert. Occaisionally wind storms remove enough sand and will expose the vein. Otherwise mining must be done with extensive supports to hold back the sand around the vein. Digging it out is easy as it crumbles when tools strike it.   It is highly sought after due to it's ability to hold moisture and provide most of the nutrients plants need to grow. Mixed with other compounds to form a composite soil blend, it is in common use. It can also be powdered and added to existing soils as a top dressing or included as part of an aquaponic ammendment.   Extracts can be made which has culinary uses where an earthy, pungent seasoning is desired. The flavor remains even after long storage times. Foods prepared with sedivermeric extract are also spoilage resistant, so it is a favorite among those that produce long-term supplies. Settlements where veins of sedivermeric are frequent often have unique delicacies which include this extract as a main feature. A favorite is a candy which includes a spicy heat, and is often carried by exporers in the deep waste as a way to keep their mouths moist in an effort to reduce needless water consumption.   The extract can be further concentrated into a stimulant psyhotropic drug which is called Spring. Habitual use stains mucous membranes yellow and eventually orange. Some aquire a yellowish to gold-orange tint to the skin. An interesting side effect of the discoloration is an increased resistance to sunburn. Long term use of Spring does lead to liver and kidney failure. It is available in small bottles as a drink.


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