Food in Faerun - Что едят в Фаэруне

It could go without saying (but won’t) that differ¬ent nations and cities and areas and races in the Realms have foods they prefer; the following sec¬tions highlight a few of these special dishes, and the creative names that many have been given.   Cuisine of the Cold North   It’s a very old joke to say that inhabitants of the Frozenfar eat whatever they can catch—all too often, each other.   The North is home to myriad hardy plants that survive years of successive hard freezes and thaws, growing low to the ground with abundant berries. Many an adventurer digging a snow cave to survive a night’s sleep in the howling open has uncovered a good meal of tharberries (large, beige-to-white, chewy berries), laum berries (honey-sweet, orange, tiny berries), blooddrops (bright red berries that taste like cooked onions), or one of the other threescore edible berries.   Yet in a region where ore hordes rise every few decades to scour the land of everything ed¬ible in their path, the true essential for humans in the North is the rothe. This large, shaggy beast provides its milk and meat as food. The milk is used both as a liquid for drinking and cooking and to make cheese, and the meat yields roasts that are either stewed in rothe blood, fire-roasted, or “long-roasted” into long-lasting “trail gnaw.” The rothe’s dung can be used as fire-fuel, and its hides and the warmth of its living body can be used to protect against the cold. Roaming wild herds of rothe and cultivated, “trapped” herds of hobbled or penned-in-mountain-vales rothe, plus deer, have made human settlement possible in the North.   Cuisine of the Inner Sea North   Hunted game has always been prominent on the tables of all lands on the northern side of the Sea of Fallen Stars. This fare is in contrast to the farmed livestock and poultry that dominate in the kitchens on the southern side of the Inner Sea. Typical city food in the lands north of the Sea of Fallen Stars is much like the cuisine of the Dragon Reach port of Tantras.   Tantras has lots of fresh fish and eel shops and stands, and its streets often reek of cooking fish in early evening. Yet a baeranth is the most popu¬lar everyday evening meal for Tantrans. The dish is a meat pie or tart with a peppery gravy inside, baked to a golden brown finish. A true baeranth mixes the smoked meat of cattle, goat, and hogs in a three-one-one ratio, but there are the inevita¬ble tales of dogs and even humans going missing and winding up in these ever-present pies.   Baeranths vary in price from 1 sp for six to 2 cp each, depending on the size and freshness of the pie and the reputation of the shop. They are always sold hot, and can be bought from about highsun to dusk from dozens of serving-shutter- on-the-street-wall shops with names like Karvin’s and Thurnan’s Oven and The Meltmouth.   Sarkul (smoked fish) is also popular in Tantras. The fish are caught in the Reach, immersed in honey and seasonings, and then hung and smoked for several days in closed sheds to produce the savory sarkul. Fish is never put in a baeranth.   Locally, for some unknown reason, the very idea of fish pies is considered revolting.   Tantras has many taverns, but few dining halls or anything else similar to a restaurant. Its inns typically lack dining rooms or taprooms. Instead, they serve warm mulled cider and cold ale with buttered bread—often mraedin, a very dark, rich nutbread akin to pumpernickel—up in the rooms of guests. The taverns of Tantras serve the usual drinks, plus hot buns covered with melted cheese (but little other food). Some taverns put sliced ol¬ives or slices of sausage on the cheese of hot buns so they’ll stick to it, to make their buns distinctive and popular.   Across the Inner Sea, the Akanamere supports local fisheries that bring in crabs, eels, and druth (a brown flatfish that resembles the detached sole of a leather moccasin). The eels and the flatfish are sun-dried to prepare them for transport and sale; when soaked in water or shredded into a soup or stew, they readily reconstitute. The eels have an odd, nutty taste and the flatfish have a hearty smoked bacon-like flavor but a leathery, hard-chewing consistency.   The crabs are often called stone crabs for their mottled gray color and rounded shape. They are usually tossed alive into layers of salt in barrels for transport elsewhere, an act that kills them and preserves them. After being bought out of the barrel, they must be soaked for a day to get rid of the salt, or boiled very briefly with kurlath leaves (the broad green leaves of a wild, shade-loving ground plant otherwise useful only for wrapping things in) to drive out the salt. Then the crabs can be prepared however desired. Eaten raw, stone crabs have a taste somewhat like real-world tinned smoked oysters, though they’re not at all oily.   The flavor of the meat readily awakens when it is cooked with herbs and spices, becoming stronger and more crablike. The crabs are extremely tasty when steamed, boiled, fried, or fire-seared.   Along the Chessentan and northern Turmish coast, tall broadleaf reeds grow thickly, forming what some folk call giantgrass forests. These serve as ideal places to hide for aquatic creatures, or for those who have access to a small, slender water¬craft that can be poled and paddled. The reeds can be interlaced and woven into improvised roofs, clothing, and carrying containers—and are edible as well, though they are stingingly hot, like the green ends of leeks, when chewed raw. When boiled or stewed, they exude a gummy essence used as a thickener in many kitchens—and such a stew is nourishing in itself. Coastal dwellers usu¬ally add frogs, snails, fish, or meat scraps to such stews to yield full and satisfying meals. Families often sit around the stew-pot dipping wedges of stale bread into it, which they then eat, alternat¬ing bites with strong cheeses. This activity is known around the Inner Sea as a bowl feast.   Tetnyrian Cuisine   Tethyr is a verdant, long-settled country with many farms, and active fishing along its coasts and on its rivers. Its cultivated vineyards are lo¬cated mainly inland, in the south and particularly southeast of the realm. Local meals vary with the wealth of the diners and the resources available— such as fresh fish in ports and along coastal roads, and smoked or salted fish elsewhere—but in gen¬eral, daily meals in rural Tethyr tend to consist of large morningfeasts, light afternoon snacks known as runsun, and long and large evenfeasts.   Morningfeasts tend to be evenfeast leftovers, such as vegetables and scraps of meat or fish, fried in onions and oil.   Runsuns began their existence as field meals for farm workers, consisting of a drink and a sa¬vory pie—the sort of thing that is also standard tavern fare, and is served at inns in the dark hours. The pies are cold, filled with spiced roast fowl or leftover meats such as ham, diced beef, smoked meats or, along the coast, fish. All of this meat is chopped and mixed with diced parsnips or potatoes in a spinach-and-mint or spinach- and-hot-peppers “simmer sauce.”   Evenfeast is the longest meal of the day, typi¬cally served after dark (when day work is done).   At expensive inns and in grand houses, it is a large meal of multiple courses, including spiced vegetables in various sauces, and fowl stuffed with herbed meats and “frothed” vegetables. The meal is washed down with various wines, and ends in a sweet fruit tart of some sort. In simpler households, evenfeast tends to be a large, hearty “manymeats” stew. In coastal settlements, the stew is often replaced by skewers of roasted-with- diced-vegetables fish (fish-kebabs), accompanied by garlic bread or cheese-flavored bread, and with a dessert of diced cheese and apples, or even a sweet (berry) pie.   Locally, for some unknown reason, the very idea of fish pies is considered revolting.   Tantras has many taverns, but few dining halls or anything else similar to a restaurant. Its inns typically lack dining rooms or taprooms. Instead, they serve warm mulled cider and cold ale with buttered bread—often mraedin, a very dark, rich nutbread akin to pumpernickel—up in the rooms of guests. The taverns of Tantras serve the usual drinks, plus hot buns covered with melted cheese (but little other food). Some taverns put sliced ol¬ives or slices of sausage on the cheese of hot buns so they’ll stick to it, to make their buns distinctive and popular.   Across the Inner Sea, the Akanamere supports local fisheries that bring in crabs, eels, and druth (a brown flatfish that resembles the detached sole of a leather moccasin). The eels and the flatfish are sun-dried to prepare them for transport and sale; when soaked in water or shredded into a soup or stew, they readily reconstitute. The eels have an odd, nutty taste and the flatfish have a hearty smoked bacon-like flavor but a leathery, hard-chewing consistency.   The crabs are often called stone crabs for their mottled gray color and rounded shape. They are usually tossed alive into layers of salt in barrels for transport elsewhere, an act that kills them and preserves them. After being bought out of the barrel, they must be soaked for a day to get rid of the salt, or boiled very briefly with kurlath leaves (the broad green leaves of a wild, shade-loving ground plant otherwise useful only for wrapping things in) to drive out the salt. Then the crabs can be prepared however desired. Eaten raw, stone crabs have a taste somewhat like real-world tinned smoked oysters, though they’re not at all oily.   The flavor of the meat readily awakens when it is cooked with herbs and spices, becoming stronger and more crablike. The crabs are extremely tasty when steamed, boiled, fried, or fire-seared.   Along the Chessentan and northern Turmish coast, tall broadleaf reeds grow thickly, forming what some folk call giantgrass forests. These serve as ideal places to hide for aquatic creatures, or for those who have access to a small, slender water¬craft that can be poled and paddled. The reeds can be interlaced and woven into improvised roofs, clothing, and carrying containers—and are edible as well, though they are stingingly hot, like the green ends of leeks, when chewed raw. When boiled or stewed, they exude a gummy essence used as a thickener in many kitchens—and such a stew is nourishing in itself. Coastal dwellers usu¬ally add frogs, snails, fish, or meat scraps to such stews to yield full and satisfying meals. Families often sit around the stew-pot dipping wedges of stale bread into it, which they then eat, alternat¬ing bites with strong cheeses. This activity is known around the Inner Sea as a bowl feast.   Tetnyrian Cuisine   Tethyr is a verdant, long-settled country with many farms, and active fishing along its coasts and on its rivers. Its cultivated vineyards are lo¬cated mainly inland, in the south and particularly southeast of the realm. Local meals vary with the wealth of the diners and the resources available— such as fresh fish in ports and along coastal roads, and smoked or salted fish elsewhere—but in gen¬eral, daily meals in rural Tethyr tend to consist of large morningfeasts, light afternoon snacks known as runsun, and long and large evenfeasts.   Morningfeasts tend to be evenfeast leftovers, such as vegetables and scraps of meat or fish, fried in onions and oil.   Runsuns began their existence as field meals for farm workers, consisting of a drink and a sa¬vory pie—the sort of thing that is also standard tavern fare, and is served at inns in the dark hours. The pies are cold, filled with spiced roast fowl or leftover meats such as ham, diced beef, smoked meats or, along the coast, fish. All of this meat is chopped and mixed with diced parsnips or potatoes in a spinach-and-mint or spinach- and-hot-peppers “simmer sauce.”   Evenfeast is the longest meal of the day, typi¬cally served after dark (when day work is done).   At expensive inns and in grand houses, it is a large meal of multiple courses, including spiced vegetables in various sauces, and fowl stuffed with herbed meats and “frothed” vegetables. The meal is washed down with various wines, and ends in a sweet fruit tart of some sort. In simpler households, evenfeast tends to be a large, hearty “manymeats” stew. In coastal settlements, the stew is often replaced by skewers of roasted-with- diced-vegetables fish (fish-kebabs), accompanied by garlic bread or cheese-flavored bread, and with a dessert of diced cheese and apples, or even a sweet (berry) pie.   moose’s eating habits; lulleth, which is a thick stew made of either muskrat, shrew, vole, or branchcat (a tree-climbing cross between a mink and a raccoon boar, which most elves dislike, prepared the same way as lulleth; seared rabbit; silvereyes, which is a fish stew of silverflash and other small forest stream fish; sornstag, which is roasted hotspice (curried) venison; surkyl, which is porcupine with its belly slashed to insert leek and herbs, then rolled in clay and fire-baked so that the hide and quills can be removed with hardened mud shell; and lastly, thaenwing, which is spiced-and-diced grouse, partridge, quail, and woodguth (wild turkey). Most elves are revolted by the thought of eating owls, which they deem intelligent souls, and they believe that dining on raptors brings misfortune on oneself and one’s kin.   Trail Food: Marruth (sometimes disparag¬ingly called root pies by dwarves and humans) are pastries into which spiced and herbed mashes of vegetables have been baked. Once cooled, these pastries are rolled into rallow leaves (heavy, oily, waterproof broadleaves) to keep them from rot¬ting, and carried for eating cold when on the move. Mint nut cheese, nuts, and dried berries are also popular trail food, as is taece, which re¬sembles a brown, finger-length sardine and is made of fire-dried, tiny forest-stream fish. These fish contain a lot of fat, and are “crunched” (eaten whole, bones and all).   Desserts: Mint jelly and tarts made of various berries, sweetened with a mash of berry juices.   Drow Cuisine   The green wine of the drow is made from or¬bloren, an Underdark rock fungus, distilled in a mixture of water and the juice of another sort of subterranean fungus.   Orbloren is an abundant, greenish vegetation that grows on moist rock walls. It is not nutri¬tious, but it is also not harmful either. To be made into wine, it must be boiled in water into which another sort of fungus—abundant gray scaly scabs of marrult (imagine dun-hued slices of pepperoni thrown against a stone wall and stick¬ing, in clusters)—has been crushed. Not much marrult is needed to make the water right for distilling the orbloren, but lots of marrult yields the richest, most tasty, and most highly valued green wine.   The distillate is captured in a cold metal hood- and-bowl affair above the boiling vessel. It is then chilled in the dark, often by immersing metal containers of it in subterranean streams, for forty days or so. After that, it is drinkable green wine.   If drunk earlier, it burns the tongue and throat.   If it is murky, adding just a few grains of salt will clear it. It keeps for years, unless boiled, which gives it a disgusting burnt taste and a black, oily hue. It’s still not poisonous—just horrible.   There are strong drow alcoholic drinks that use spider venom or secretions as ingredients, but don’t believe the rumors: Green wine is not one of them.   Drow eat a wide variety of lichens stewed into soups, as well as Underdark worms, insects (fried in pack-lizard oil), and lizard flesh. Lolth-wor- shipers do not eat arachnids.   Gnome and Halfling Cuisine   Haflings tend to dwell among humans and often make their livings producing food for humans— especially baked goods, stews, and sauces, but also portable foods such as sausages and wheels of cheese. They also make versions of all of these edibles for themselves that differ from the human versions in texture and seasonings. Halflings prize the chewy, rubbery consistency disliked by most humans, and halflings hate strong human spicing such as pepper, vastly preferring the sub¬tle, gentle meldings of various herbs. In winter, most halfling homes have two ongoing stews sim¬mering on the hearth: a light broth that can be drunk by the tankard, and a heavy broth, which is full of lumps of meat and vegetables.   Halflings dominate the populations of two Heartlands locations, Secomber and Corm Orp, so these places provide a glimpse of what half¬lings produce when left to their druthers. In both settlements, cuisine is dominated by flavored cheeses, wines and table grapes, and goat and sheep flesh prepared in many ways.   In Corm Orp, local hin produce pottery from the rich local clays, and grapes in profusion. The common grapes are both sour wine grapes and “blue eyes,” edible grapes named for their color that grow in halfling-fist-sized clusters. Corm Orp produces wines and grape-based dyes for    export, and mixed food crops for local consump¬tion. Many goats and sheep are kept in the hills overlooking Corm Orp, yielding milk, wool, and cheese. The cheese made from these goats and sheep is a soft, buttery yellow substance called Orthin (after its long-dead first maker it’s not much different from real-life Brie, but is never runny and has a very thin rind. From time to time, a few blankets made of wool or goat-hair are exported, but the rest of what the herds yield—in-cluding all the meat—is consumed locally. It has been accurately said that “cheese, bread, ale, and more cheese are what fill a happy hin’s stomach.”   Gnome cuisine is very like halfling cuisine, ex¬cept that gnomes tend to make savory puddings. These are typically mixed vegetables and meats bound together in a rich gravy so heavy in natural gelatin that the whole sets into quivering semi-so¬lidity. Gnomes prefer large savory pies for family meals, and sausages (or just drawstring sacks of cut-up, cold spiced meats) and very sweet dessert tarts for portable individual meals. Gnomes tend to like thick, dark, heavy beer, often fortified into something much more fiery. So where a halfling looks for cheese, a gnome turns to savory pud¬ding. Gnome puddings made for travel are often sewn into skins, like real-world haggis.   Dwarven Cuisine   Among humans, dwarves are known to be hearty eaters—especially of roasts that a human would consider dry and overdone—and are legendary for their prodigious capacity for ale and strong drink. They avidly devour food so salty that a human would shudder, but seem little attracted to sweets.   Down in their mines, dwarves always keep rock salt handy, and they lick salt from the “living rock” around them as well. Food is whatever can be caught—or must be fought—in the caverns, eaten raw if need be but preferably cooked, with an always-going simmer-pot to render tendons, fat, and blood down into gravy.   Dwarves won’t eat ore flesh unless they are starving. Ore blood in gravy, however, is perfectly acceptable. Like humans, dwarves have depended on rothe to expand across the northern regions, and their tradition of axe-throwing was born from hunting rothe, deer, and other fleet-footed beasts in the mountains and rolling hills of the Realms.     These days, by preference, dwarves are hearty meat eaters. Vegetables (except for raw parsnips, which most dwarves carry and gnaw on as snacks) are mere garnish. Sausages are subsistence food for the trail, nothing more than “fillbelly” (the dwarves’ term for edibles eaten to sustain life rather than for pleasure). Cheese and milk fall into the same category, good only for fuel and not considered “real food.”   A guilty secret among dwarves is their love for certain small cave-worms and earthworms, munched raw. These are a prized and addictive candy to many dwarves and are the reason why a dwarf who butchers livestock always looks for tapeworms and other parasites of such beasts’ in¬nards. Dwarf-only dens (city cellar alehouses that lack signs and usually have several entrances from adjacent cellars belonging to other businesses or residences) always set out bowls of live worms on tables for drinkers to take freely. If they want pa¬trons to leave, collecting these bowls is a silent but firm—and except in rare instances, well heeded— signal to go. (Now, and quietly.)   FOOD FROM THE WILD   In most wilderland areas of the Realms, outside of an easy bowshot away from any caravan road, Faerun still teems with readily edible plants and game, unless recent forest fires or other scourges have taken their toll locally.   For instance, in the Skull Gorge along the River Reaching in the Heartlands, wayfarers can readily find wild food along the swift, icy-cold river. From the Misty Stair cascades to below the Gorge, the river is the spawning beds of dreel— short, fat, green-black river eels that live on algae and carrion, and keep the river waters clean and clear. They taste like mucus but are quite nour¬ishing, and if fried with the right herbs or spices, can actually taste nice. Due to their appearance, dreel are sometimes called trollfingers.   Also prevalent in this area are dartflash, which are small-human-palm-sized, bony silver fish that swim in short, very fast darting-straight-ahead rushes. Dartflash are usually netted or scooped out of the water in handheld nets. They are edi¬ble, often steamed until the bones are soft enough    to crunch and eat, though a human adult needs a helm-full pile of them to make a meal.   Lastly, mursk are quite common. Mursk are fat, slow-moving, green-brown fish that are un¬pleasantly oily in taste, but can be fried, allowing the cook to skim off the oil for use in lamps.   Across the Heartlands, traethe (trqy-thh), a kind of wild radish, grows abundantly and can be plucked and eaten freely (except, of course, in city garden plots or on a farm). Many adventurers, pilgrims, and other wayfarers fall into the habit of stooping, picking, cleaning off the worst of the earth, and eating as they walk throughout the day. Most traethe are mild, with a hot aftertaste, and are considered boring but functional fare.   Humans dwelling near swamps tend to use lots of marsh plants for cooking and alchemy, and eels and savory, clam-like swamp mollusks for eating. A large marsh is one of the richest places for foraging in all the Realms; the children of a household in such an area can expect to spend most of their days playing, since they can gather enough edibles for a large evening meal in a rela¬tively short time before sunset.   Finding fresh, clean drinkable water near a marsh isn’t always easy. However, if one doesn’t mind drinking brownish, muck-tasting water, there are herbs that can be dropped into contain¬ers of water to “kill the squigglies” and make the water safe to drink, and also some forest plants that can be boiled for a juice to added to marsh water to precipitate the floating brown sedi¬ment out of it and alter its taste to something less strong. Other tisanes (teas) of rose petals and other floral petals can then be added to the water to make it quite pleasant to taste. Selling “sweet” water in villages along trade routes is a wide¬spread, sustaining industry across the Realms.   Masters of the Marsh   Lizardfolk dwelling in most marshlands will trade warily with other races, if they are not threatened and if they can do such trading in ways that don’t require leaving the vicinity of the swamp, because they feel very vulnerable away from easy reach of the waters. Such bargaining must be done without a lot of speech or long bargaining, since lizard- folk will not put up with such. Lizardfolk are not unthinkingly, unobservantly stupid; within their   a.     home area, they know the land very well, and tend to be cunning.   Lizardfolk can set snares, flush out prey by working in well-organized hunting bands, are stealthy foragers, and often prepare hideouts in overgrown wilderness areas to keep themselves hidden from the eyes of humans and others who might offer them harm. They are particularly learned in what swamp plants can be crushed and smeared on themselves to entirely baffle anything trying to identify them by scent—as well as what undergrowth they must pass through to thwart those trying to track them. They turn hostile if they think they are being stealthily surrounded, or being distracted by one group of traders while another group readies an attack.   Some lizardfolk know what diets and marsh substances smeared on the skins of snakes will make those reptiles mate more often and produce more young, and the lizardfolk raise and tend such snakes to make sure the maximum num¬ber survive and grow to adult size to keep the breeding stock strong and to fill the curled-leaf “platters” that hold lizardfolk meals. There is no truth to the rumor that lizardfolk won’t eat the flesh of any reptile; snakes and small lizards are staples of their diet.   I have scoured official D&D products to pull out useful stuff. Originally I thought I'd have to pore over every sourcebook and module, but it turns out that Dragon Magazine has had a couple of articles that really cover this quite well. This will be a compilation of those articles, and some other interesting stuff I found along the way. If you want just one article to cover all your bases (aside from the above tavern generator), go get Dragon Magazine #418. There's an article in there called "Inns in an Instant". It is utterly fantastic. It has everything: charts for making inns, names for innkeepers, lists of inn names, lists of NPCs, atmosphere charts... it's unreal. There's three pages of food and drink options. Here's an example of just one of the 9 charts of food and drink:   For 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons, food, drink and lodging are covered on page 158 of the player's handbook as well as on the free online basic rules site under "Equipment". I have tried to assemble the food under the guidelines of "Poor", "Modest", "Wealthy" and etc. I also found a few articles in old issues of dragon magazine on magic food and drink. I will include them as well, following the mundane listing.   Food   Listed from cheapest to most expensive, following the "Lifestyle" guidelines. Squalid 3 cp Humble pie (filled with tripe or cow heel) Acorn soup Rice and peas Green chili stew Grilled snake and macadamia Frogs on skewers Onion soup Lizard gruel with nutbread Crisped worm skewers and potatoes Poor 6 cp Porridge Mushroom stew with corn bread Leg of mutton and goose eggs Beef stew and sourdough Squash and fish soup Mutton meatloaf Rabbit and baked pumpkin Bread-bowl stew Hot beet soup and fresh bread Bog-beetle dumplings Wayfarers' cake Cooked wolf steak Wren pot pie and cattail soup Thistle salad with roasted grubs Barbecued gopher legs on a stick Modest 3 sp Grilled wild boar chops Broiled salmon and potatoes Roast chicken and potatoes Smoked sausage, goose eggs and dates Cheese pie and onion soup Baked boar and greens Minted pea soup Baked goat flank Rabbit stew and willow crackers Lemming and berry soup Comfortable 8 sp Honey braised boar ribs Venison and bean stew Buffaloaf and honeyed corn Rack of lamb platter Pork chop & curds Elven bread Baked loin of pork with gravy Roasted cod and mashed potatoes Beef steak and kidney pie Clams and garlic Toasted delfarnbread with spiced snail-butter Grayling prawns poached with plovers’ eggs in garlic butter Wealthy 2 gp Baked pheasant with leeks Smoked salmon and wild berries Chocolate covered ants and roast pelican Barbecued tiger fish and papaya Roast chicken with thyme Stuffed trout, cabbage, succotash and plum pudding Braised beef and pears with ginger Meerkat dumplings with sage Aristocratic 4 gp Roast stag in antler sauce Poached and peppered quail eggs Spiced monkey tail and cashews Roast heron and chopped sundew Lobster in tomato cream sauce Crab-stuffed lobster tail Roast pheasant in oyster sauce Poached duck with farro Fried ostrich and egg omelet Monster Food This is food you might see hobgoblins or orcs eating. Crunchy critters and grub pudding Smashed guts and cabbage Not-so-old rice in sour goat’s milk Fried chunks and lard bread Salted eyes and carrot ends Bone and blood mix stew Lettuce, liver, and lung pie Underdark Food This is stuff you might eat in a drow enclave, svirfneblin community or a dwarven hall. Fluorescent fungus salad with cave grubs Diced blind eel and deep salts Amber lichen and softrock bread Translucent crayfish stew Crimson moss cakes and cave jelly Crustacean broth with ironloaf Roasted deep beetles with algae dip Toasted salamander in mineral pepper Arachnidumplings and fried fungus (Drow would not eat arachnidumplings, as they revere spiders) Toadstool steak tainted with myconid essence Lobe of grell Deep rothe steak (A rothe is a special type of cattle bred in the underdark) Elven Food   Almost all of this is from the mind of Ed Greenwood, who is utterly amazing. I found this at Candlekeep. Vegetables (eaten raw, sometimes diced and fried with herbs and other vegetables): Cress Leek (also chives, hotwhips [spring onions], searshoots [wild Faerûnian vine onions]: These last are a staple of elven cuisine, and if left to dry until fall, can grow as hot as garlic, but never give elves "garlic breath") Parsley Coushoots (the green, growing "new" shoots of certain forest vines, such as Chokevine and Thaelthorn) Greenspear (asparagus, a staple with many elves, both raw and steamed with herbs) Various ferns, from fiddleheads to stewed broadleaves Brownbuds (brown Faerûnian wild forest radishes) Fruits: Many sorts of berries Rhubarb Roseapple (a mild-flavored apple-like fruit that grows at the thorny junctures of a particular sort of forest vine, the "rosethorn," that grows abundantly in the Heartlands) Aelfengrape Fruit (A handful of these provides the nourishment equivalent to an entire meal - see Dragon Magazine #357) Soups (usually served cold): Leek Turtle Blalatha (certain mushrooms, diced and then boiled) Darblalatha (certain mushrooms, diced, then fried with leeks, and then the mixed result is boiled) Haendur (simmered glow worms, seasoned with particular sharp-tasting leaves) Blackbark (literally, the stewed bark of four or five different sorts of forest bushes; tastes and looks a little like a thick beef stew) Snake (four sorts, beheaded and then boiled until skins separate from flesh; skins, like heads, are discarded) Meat and Fish Dishes (some elves eat flesh, some do not): Seared Rabbit Thaenwing (spiced-and-diced grouse, partridge, quail, and woodguth [wild turkey]; most elves are revolted at the thought of eating owls, whom they deem "intelligent souls," and believe dining on raptors brings misfortune on oneself and one's kin) Silvereyes (fish stew, of silverflash and other small forest stream fish) Sornstag (roasted hotspice [equivalent of curried] venison) Surkyl (beaver: belly-slashed to insert leek and herbs, then rolled in clay and fire-baked, to remove hide and quills with hardened mud shell) Hooroun (moose, always marinated with particular herbs to counteract the natural seasonal tastes of spruce in winter and spring [when moose have been eating evergreen tips] and swamp in summer and fall [when moose have been grazing on swamp vegetation]) Lulleth (muskrat and equivalents [from shrews and voles to "branchcats," which are a tree-climbing Faerûnian cross between a mink and a raccoon], usually simmered into a thick stew; most elves dislike boar, but when they do eat it, treat it in this same way) Groundsnake (beheaded and roasted on skewers over a fire) Trail Food: Various nuts and dried berries Mintnut cheese Taece (fire-dried tiny forest-stream fish, that look a little like brown, finger-length sardines, contain a lot of fat, and are "crunched" [eaten whole, bones and all]) Marruth (sometimes disparagingly called "root pies" by dwarves and humans): pastries into which cooked spiced and herbed mashes of vegetables have been baked, and then let cool, and then rolled into rallow leaves (heavy, oily, waterproof broadleaves) to keep them from rotting, and carried for eating cold when on the move Desserts: Mint jelly Tarts made of various berries, sweetened with a mash of berry juices Quaffs/Slakes (non-alcoholic): Sprucebark quaff (cleanses palate/freshens breath before meals and after) Mintwater Various berry-juice drinks (unfermented) Planar Food   Feywine Raisins (15 gp) Fey grapes are so lush that even when they become raisins they retain their essence. If you put these in a goblet and stir, they instantly become wine. Carceri snails (7 sp) Poached stirge eggs (5 sp) Boiled shank of bebilith (5 gp) Blood Pudding Death Cheese (10 gp) Made from catoblepas milk. Bytopian Cheese: (1 gp/pound) Made from goat's milk. There's three types - blue, red and white. At night, the blue cheese glows in the dark and has a spicy flavor. Fire Fruit: (2 sp) A fruit that is deadly to all but fire-resistant beings. This fruit comes from the plane of fire and it burns with a soft flame. You blow out the flame and then eat it immediately. Once extinguished, this fruit goes bad in minutes. Venders serve them with tongs. Arborean Fireseeds: Snack foor from Arborea. Usually sold in sacks of a few dozen, when this seed comes into contact with water, including saliva, it erupts into a soft, harmless flame. Not enough to see by or burn, but it provides an interesting sensation in the mouth as it dissolves, having a vague smoky flavor to it. (Planescape: Torment) Gar-Bar Root: This small treat is a rubbery material usually sold in small cubes that, when chewed, produce a strong, almost overpowering sweetness that quickly dulls over time. Gar-bar root is slightly addictive, though controllably so in most people, and is not meant to be swallowed. (Planescape: Torment) Elysian Pears: The elysian pear is amongst the most flavorful breeds of pear in the planes, and treasured by epicures throughout the Outer Planes. (Planescape: Torment) Crimson Lotus Petals: (Planescape: Torment) Brownish0red flakes that melt on your tongu, leaving n odd aftertaste. Makes some people a bit disriented. (Planescape: Torment) Bytopian Shepherd's Bread: (Planescape: Torment) Aromatic, smells like carrots and almond. Sweet and light. (Planescape: Torment) Shiftspice from Limbo: (Planescape: Torment) If you focus, you can modify the taste of the spice. If you don't, it tastes different every time. Sea-Plums: (Planescape: Torment) Pitless, blue-green fruit. The rind is sour, meat is sweet combining for a pleasant meal. Fiendspice: Known fiendspices include devilwort, goryenne, and mephosweat. These spices in normal conditions can be quite hazardous to mortals, wreaking havoc on their digestive processes and even causing damage in great enough quantities. However, in areas of natural blandness, such as the Ethereal Plane, the effects of these spices are subdued enough that they can be safely consumed by mortal beings. (Guide to the Ethereal Plane, page 10) Magic Food Sweetheart's Confection (10 gp) A heart-shaped fey confection that is split into two halves and shared between lovers before they part company for a time. They gain an emotional bond until they see each other again, sensing the other's emotions. Feybread Biscuit: This is hard but nutritional, and gives you extra hit points when you heal for the next 12 hours. Droth: Also known as “demon’s blood,” droth is a black, sticky substance made from the blood of demons. When smeared on the eyes, it cures certain sorts of blindness in some individuals, and when ingested, it can help to cure diseases. It is also effective in battling green slime. Moonhoney: The dung of Abyssal groundworms, it is a smoky-tasting and delicious. Its name comes from its consistency and appearance , and it gains sweetness in direct moonlight. It can neutralize poisons and is an ideal trail food for wayfarers of all kinds, who can readily carve it into handy chunks. Blood Apricots: These grow in Hell or in places where a lot of blood has been spilled. The fruit is a rich orange-red and it grows darker if given a taste of blood. You can put your own blood in it (storing hit dice). Within 12 hours, whoever eats the fruit gains hit points. Fey Cherries: These grant protetion from evil to those who consume them. Once picked, it retains its property for a single day. The spell gentle repose can lengthen this. Fey cherry trees only create cherries once every decade, making these quite rare. A healthy sapling sells for 3,000 gold. Flame Clove: (20 gp) A garlic herb infused with energy from the Elemental Plane of Fire. When blended into food, it can keep a meal hot for d4 days. Stone Cheese: This appears to be a yellow disc 2 inches in diameter. When placed in boiling water for half a hour, the cheese swells to 14 inches in diameter and 5 inches thick. It tastes like sharp cheddar and is fresh for one week. Everloaf: An enchanted loaf of bread. It always remains fresh. If half of the loaf is intact and the other half is eaten, it regenerates the missing bread in one hour. If you pour a liquid through a slice, the bread will detect poison by turning black. Drinks   I am going to list these by type. The player's handbook doesn't give prices for all different types of booze, so use your own judgement. Cheap Stuff Grog (rum with water, maybe with lemon or lime) Dregs and water ("dregs" are defined as the sediment in a liquid, such as wine or coffee) Goblin spit ale Orc Kragg: Very powerful, nauseates non-goblinoids. Popular among orcs and goblinoids. (Arms & Equipment Guide page 31) Goblin Thudrud: Has the "taste and smell of a rotting cow that caught fire." Goblinoids and some barbarians like it. Turnip wine Miller’s moonshine Ale (4 sp for a mug) Dwarven ale Pulsch Brown Ale: Halflings make this. It has a pleasant, nutty flavor. (Arms & Equipment Guide page 31) Moon Mountain Ale: Very popular drink from the Moon Mountain Brewery in the Forgotten Realms. (Dragon Magazine #299) Spiced ale King’s ale Trollbane ale Wine (common, 2 sp for a pitcher) Desert star wine Wight wine (I imagine this has a goofy undead wight on the label) Rice wine Fine Wine (10 gp a bottle) Fey wine Wild orchid wine Lotus leaf wine Stonesulder wine: This yellow-hued, sharp-flavored liquid is made by the sap from demon plants from the Abyss, which is then fermented in wooden barrels. Aelfengrape wine: This elven drink is extraordinarily potent but doesn't have a refined taste. Champagne du le Stomp: (Curse of Strahd page 77) Wizard of Wines logo Red Dragon Crush: (Curse of Strahd page 77) Wizard of Wines logo Grapesmash No. 3: (Curse of Strahd page 77) Wizard of Wines logo Elven Aleeian Wine: Grapes plucked from wild vines deep in the forest. Takes several months to create one batch. (Arms & Equipment Guide page 31) Dwarven Garnet Wine: Made from grapes high in the mountains. (Arms & Equipment Guide page 31) Assorted Other Drinks Cactus spirits Dragonbite Bitter: Exceptionally dark beer. Recipe is centuries old, only the Dragonbite Brewery makes it. (Arms & Equipment Guide page 31) Dwarfhead Stout: A powerful, "day to day" brew favored by warriors. Mostly found in dwarven communities. (Arms & Equipment Guide page 31) Frenzywater: Extremely potent. Bottle may sometimes spontaneously burst into flame if left in sunlight. Might cause a berserker rage. (Arms & Equipment Guide page 31) Gnome Golden Light: A lightweight beer with flowery accents. Elven Mead: Elves use exotic honey in the forest to make this. Even dwarves like this drink. (Arms & Equipment Guide page 31) Elven Moondrop: Exquisite drink made by experts using fresh dew and moonlight. (Arms & Equipment Guide page 31) Moonslake: Minty halfling drink. Alcoholic apple cider that's been mixed with water in which crushed mint has been boiled, then strained out again. Cool taste, humans don't like the after-taste. (Dragon Magazine #299) Moon Mountain Dark: Full, nut-bitter beer beloved by halflings, gnomes and dwarves. Humans find it salty. (Dragon Magazine #299) Moon Rum: Fiery, raw, red-purple in hue and little loved on its own. (Dragon Magazine #299) Fharlanghn spirits Swamplight spirits Desert lily brandy Berry brandy Goat’s milk and brandy Herb and mint tea with brandy Peach wine Tangerine brandy Fireweed whiskey Wanderer whiskey Bacon beer Dwarven double draft Scorpionweed reserve Corellon reserve Moss mead Lemon mead Honeysuckle mead Moradin mead Silvermoon mead Sundew mead Sparkling Evermead Glitter mead Underdark Drinks Shadow stein Softrock spirits Lichen liqueur Mineral mead Moradin mead Algae ale Deeps ale Mushroom Wine: There are many different types made by Underdark dwellers. (Arms & Equipment Guide page 31) Drow Spiderblood: Mushroom wine with a dose of venom from poisonous spiders. To get acclimated to this drink and not get poisoned, you need to drink a little bit each day for several months. (Arms & Equipment Guide page 31) Mushroom moonshine Fungus wine Darklake Stout: This drink is a signature ale brewed by the Muzgardt clan of Duergar that live in the Underdark settlement of Gracklstugh in the Forgotten Realms (see Out of the Abyss page 56). Planar Drinks Viperwine: A drink that demons enjoy, but is lethal to other humanoids. Sometimes humanoids will take an antidote before drinking it to avoid the lethal effects. Fekk: A strong githzerai liquor. Razorvine Wine: Made from the sharp vines that grow in the city of Sigil . Malefic Mead: Made in an Abyssal brewery, lethal to non-demons. On a successful saving throw, the drinker will be violently ill or roaring drunk for extended periods of time. Deva's Bile: Made in an Abyssal brewery, lethal to non-demons. On a successful saving throw, the drinker will be violently ill or roaring drunk for extended periods of time. Baatezu Blood Wine: Lethal to non-humans. Greengage Cider: A potent brew from the orchard of the halfling goddess Sheela Peryroyl. It is extremely powerful. Starclear: A watered-down version of Sparkling Evermead (see "Assorted Other Drinks" list above) originally sold in The Infinite Staircase (see For Duty and Deity page 21). Arborean Wine: (130 gp/bottle) Made from giant grapes from Arborea. This intoxicates people twice as fast as normal wine (see Faction War page 22). Yellow Wurm Stout: Liquor made from soul larvae (worms with humanoid heads, they are what evil people become when they die). This is sold in The Grand Larva Emporium on Oinos, first layer of the Gray Waste of Hades (see Dragon Annual 1997 page 102). Avner's Abyssal Ale: A heavy porter made in the Abyssal plane of Azzagrat (For Duty & Deity page 47). Zelatar Zappf: A reddish lager made in the Abyssal plane of Azzagrat (For Duty & Deity page 47). Abyss Alive and Kicking: A wheat brew with a live yeast made in the Abyssal plane of Azzagrat (For Duty & Deity page 47). Firewine: (40 gold) Brewed from the Arborean fireseed, firewine is a strong, smoky-flavored wine. It is often consumed alongside fireseeds, as each enhances the flavors of the other when consumed together. (Planescape: Torment) Ethereal Ale: (Harbinger House, page 20) This drink literally evaporates on the tongue of the one partaking of it, quenching thirst and providing a delightful intoxicating effect. Ethereal ale can be found at most higher-class taverns in Sigil. (Planescape: Torment) Three-Ashes Tea: (Planescape: Torment) This beverage is a cold, bitter tea, said to aid in meditation. Popular with the Dustmen in Sigil. (Planescape: Torment) Non-Alcoholic Drinks Willow tea Black tupelo tea Plum leaf tea Crowberry cider Apricot cider Plum cider Berry cider Cranberry cider Spiced apple cider Magic Drinks   Burning Bronze Rye: This are made in the City of Brass (home to the fire genies/efreet). The bottles are sold at three different ages: aged 15 years, 50 years and 500 years. The drink waters your eyes, chases away cold feelings and imbues you with fire resistance for a short time Ghost Ale: This drink is popular in the Shadowfell. It is a dark ale that smells of musty soil but it is rich and inviting. When you drink it, you become slightly insubstantial (ignore difficult terrain and move through occupied spaces). If you drink 3 ghost ales in 5 minutes, you become unconscious for an hour. Your spirit leaves your body. It is invisible, has phasing and ignores damage (except radiant or fore). It can't attack. If your spirit takes damage, you take that damage when you wake up. Goodale: This gets its name from the fact that it is brewed in good-aligned monasteries. It reduces fatigue (on the exhaustion chart in 5e, perhaps). Astral Mead: A sweet sparkling beverage that restores the body. A flask has the nutritional value of full day's worth of food and water. For 12 hours you have a +2 to endurance checks and gain extra hit points when healing. Gorgondy Wine: A gnomish wine that offers glimpses of the past to those who drink it. Sonata Wine (fey): You cannot describe the scent or taste of this wine, which fills your head with beautiful music. For 1 hour you have a beautiful singing voice Sweet Water (20 gp) A small glob of white jelly that purifies toxic food and drink, removing any poison or disease after one minute. Firebelly (10 gp for a flagon) A harsh liquor distilled by the inhabitants of cold climates. It keeps you from suffering the effects of the cold. Burrfoot's Nut Brown Ale (20 gp for a flagon) A full-bodied ale originally created by a halfling named Nedelmeir Burrfoot. It produces a mild euphoria in drinkers that will mellow even the most taciturn dwarf.   Dwarven Grave Ale (50 gp for a flagon) When a great dwarven hero dies, skilled brewmasters are commissioned to create a signature ale to commemorate his passing. It is stored in barrels that have carvings of scenes of the dwarf's great deeds. Mage's Brew (80 gp) A thick nutty liquor that increases one's concentration and has little to no aftereffect. Evermead (200 gp for a glass) This pale golden liquor is favored by elves. Those who drink it are imbued with youthful vigor. It negates old age stat penalties for 12 hours. Drowned Man Stout (300 gp) A full-bodied ale enjoyed by orcs and evil humanoids. The living enemies of the orcs would be sealed into a barrel . The orcs find that the resulting beer acquires a heady quality. This drink provides temporary hit points for 3 hours or until lost. Beer of Eternity (750 gp) This beer is infused with radiant energy that actually would damage undead if they drank it. Living creatures who drink it become invisible to undead for 1 hour. It can also help with drained stats (in 3e terms it removes a negative level). Oathbeer (3,000 gp) Dwarves drink this as part of a ceremony to seal a pact, or as a sign of friendship and devotion. All involved swear an oath before a priest, shed blood into the beer, and the cup passed around. Oathbeer binds the drinkers to the oath, as long as they partake of their own free will. Violating the pact brings a curse upon the oathbreaker. Other Items     Mug of Clear-Headedness: This magic mug is made from bronze and gemstone. The handle is carved to depict a dwarf chopping the rim with an axe. The mug has a number of powers: All liquids poured into the cup are effected with a purify food and drink spell. Once per day, drinking from the mug cures the drinker of poisons. 3 times per day, the drinker can be affected by the spell owl's wisdom, which gives a +4 to wisdom for 1 minute per level.   Moonwater Gourd Moonwater Gourd: The gourd is intricately carved. Inside it are three stones with runes on them. Each night, the gourd refills itself with water to capacity. Properties are lost if any of the stones are removed or some other liquid is poured into it. Water Seeds: Seeds the size of a grape, runes carved into them. Dig a hole, place the seeds in a circle around it. Water magically fills it and a natural spring is born. Sometimes a nereid, water weird or water elemental appear there as well. Sweet Bladder: It looks like a normal wineskin. When water is put in it, 12 hours later the water becomes a heavy, rich cream that can feed one creature for an entire day. Your healing rate is increased as well. Satchel of Nourishment: Each day, the satchel provides enough food for one human-sized creature. The food: A fresh roll, a big piece of dried meat, and three pieces of fruit. Centurybloom Tree Seeds: These seeds grow into trees in a few months. It generates 90 pieces of fruit per month.   Bartender's Friend: This is a cup, mug or keg that can magically heat or cool its contents. It can also be commanded to stir or mix a drink. If a few drops of non-magical liquid is is in it, it can be commanded to fill itself to the brim with that drink. It can only generate one gallon of liquid per day in this manner.     Goblet of the Emporer Goblet of the Emporer: These rare goblets are crafted from gold and studded with diamonds. Everything put in the goblet i subject to purify food and drink and neutralize poison spells. Three sapphires on the cup indicate when the threat has been neutralized, by turning black and fading back to green. Once a day, the cup can be used in a toast to cast bless or enthrall. Once a year, the cup can be used in a toast to cast limited wish! Water Purifier: This pitcher made of crystal can purify food and drink on a liquid placed in it for ten minutes. It also cools a drink and makes it sweeter. The big drawback is that it turns everything into water, even expensive wine. Martyr Glass: When shattered, this crystal wineglass casts bless on all within 25 feet. It can be used in a ceremony where a solemn oath is sworn. The person who speaks the oath is blessed for as long as the oath is upheld. Courtier's Bane: When the command word is spoken, this crystal wine glass turns the wine it contains into poison. Another command word changes the wine into a potion of healing. It can only transform wine once per day. Джерело: Dragon Magazine #414: "Inns in an Instant" Dragon Magazine #334: "Drunkards & Flagons" Dragon 299, 323, 357, 414, 429, 430 Dragon Magazine Annual 1997: "Bazaar of the Bizarre" Dragon Magazine Annual 1999: "The Bare Necessities" Dragon Plus Issue 6: "Travel Talk: Volo's Visit to Barovia" Dungeon 60, 164 Temple of Elemental Evil, For Duty and Deity, Adventurers Vault, Heroes of the Feywild, Mordenkainen's Magnificent Emporium, Planescape: Faction War, Arms & Equipment Guide. http://www.dandwiki.com/wiki/3.5e_Mundane_Food_and_Drink More likely than not, common dishes will be from farm animals, & not necesarily game animals (since you'd have to hunt every day, in order to have any sort of supply). Any sort of meat dish will probably be a bit more expensive overall compared to a vegetarian one (with some exceptions). If near a sizeable body of water, then fish & other "seafood" (or lakefood/riverfood/etc.) could be an option. Grains and vegetables will probably be common fare, though I'd say whatever sorts of grains and veggies you want available, have available (you'd be limited to certain ones if you were going for a pseudo-medieval European style setting, like no corn, tomatos, or potatos, but who says that you have to?) Fruits & nuts would most likely be used in dessert dishes, if not some sort of flavoring for a meat dish. As for drinks: it'll most likely be alcohol, unless there was some regular way to pasturize milk and ensure the safety/cleanliness of water. Stuff like beers (ale, lager, bock, stout, etc.) and wines (grape or any other fruits) would be common, though mead may be if there's any sort of bee farms/honey production in the area. Harder liquors may be a bit more expensive (or maybe on par, if the crops needed were common enough), and may be reserved for more expensive places (barring of course, if a certain drink is common enough). Also, one thing that may or may not be applicable for you, but it's a little fact of the times: other than spoons (for stews & soups), no eating utensils were supplied. People brought their own knives to eat with (& forks as part of silverware didn't exist until much later). Though there would be cups/mugs for drinks, stews & soups were either in bowls or in hollowed-out round loaves of bread (sometimes the hollowed-out loaf was used to line a bowl). Instead of plates, food was served on large, flat trenchers of bread. Though the feasters could eat the bread, more oftne than not, the bread was given to the poor after meals. Of course, this may not be applicable IYC, but then again, a general lack of silverware is that much less stuff to have to recollect & wash with every diner/patron. Bowls and cups/mugs would be made of wood, ceramics, pewter, or even leather (sealed to be leak-proof). Spoons would probably be made of wood, pewter, iron, bronze, or some other tough material. One thing you may want to consider for sizeable cities/towns (though it depends on what's available IYC) is what would essentially be "fast-food shops"--they did exist in Rome. It'd be more like a place in a food court (a counter facing the walk/street, with kitchens/prep place behind) than a "restaurant." The dishes would be limited, but constantly made, and rather quick and easy to eat (i.e., no need for utensils): sandwiches, wraps, & other easily hand-held foods/entrees. Any sort of city living may limit/prohibit its dwellers from preparing food in their homes/apartments/flats (too many chances for fire), so it'd be necessary to dine at one of these shops, if not a tavern/pub/inn/etc. Джерело: Food One of the most important parts of any culture is its food, which is as important to the survival of a cultural as it is to the survival of its members. The cultures of Faerûn are no exception, and have developed in a manner similar to or apart from their real-world counterparts, resulting in a fun mix of real-world eating traditions and exotic or fantastic cuisine. The baseline diet of the Forgotten Realms is based on that of medieval Europe, particularly England, but probably just through American and Canadian ethnocentrism. The social impact of "foreign" foods (by English reckoning), such as those from France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the Middle East represent the same diversity they did in medieval Europe. Likewise, the absence of "exotic" Japanese, Chinese, and Indian cuisine serves the same purpose as medieval Europe.
The typical meal of a farmer in the heartlands consists of bread, cheese, and beer, but which bread, cheese, and beer varies greatly by region. Meats Humans domesticated all of their favorite foods centuries ago. Today, cows, pigs, chickens, goats, and sheep are a common sight in towns and cities across Faerûn. Schnitzel - Schnitzel is a general term for any cutlet of meat; the most famous is Moonsea Schnitzel, which is a fried pork cutlet. Stroganoff - Originally from Rashemen, this dish is popular across Faerûn but its ingredients vary greatly by region. The most common is made from sauteed beef, sour cream, onion powder, and pasta. Many variations include mushrooms, and some use diced potatoes instead of pasta. Wings - Deep fried chicken wings are a common site in taverns across Faerûn. They are usually coated in a sauce made from butter and a variety of peppers. Sausages Sausage is made from ground animal flesh stuffed inside a casing made from its entrails. They are often spiced, and are usually smoked for preservation and flavor. Almost every human culture in Faerûn has sausage, but they are most popular in the Silver Marches, Cormyr, and the Sword Coast. Sembian spiced sausage - A spicy pork sausage from Sembia made with garlic and fennel. Smoked rothé sausage - Smoked sausage made from the rothé, a Faerûnian buffalo. Fish and Seafood Fish is the most common meat wherever land is scarce and water is plentiful. Sushi - A Kozakuran dish, typically made from raw fish, rice, and seaweed. Hundreds of varieties exist, but only a handful are known in eastern Faerûn, and sushi is altogether unknown in the west. Grains Bread Bread is a baked dough made from flour and water, and is the most common and most varied food in all of Faerûn, and probably Abeir-Toril. The soft inside of a bread is called the crumb, while the hard outside is called the crust. Babka - A twisted loaf of sweet dough flavored with chocolate or cinnamon and topped with streusel. You can never go wrong with a babka. Chocolate babka is the best; the cinnamon babka is a lesser babka. Baguette - A long, thin loaf that is popular throughout the heartlands of Faerûn. Blackbread - Made from the sweetest, strongest molasses in Amn. Brioche - A buttery bread with a crisp crust that is popular throughout the heartlands of Faerûn. Croissant - A flaky, crescent-shaped roll that is popular throughout the heartlands of Faerûn. Elven bread - Light and sweet, one small bite can fill a man's stomach for days. Fruitcake - Flavored with rum or brandy from the Pirate Isles and studded with dried fruit and nuts. Gingerbread - A cake-like bread made with ginger from Shou Lung. Hard-Tack - A dry, bland biscuit made of unseasoned flour and water. This is eaten mainly by poorly-supplied soldiers and sailors, or adventurers who have fallen on hard times. Onion loaves - These foot-long, grub-shaped bread loaves are liberally spiced with groundroot, leeks, and onion. They're best eaten with drippings, while hot. Pretzel - A lightly-salted, twisted loaf of dough baked until it develops a brown crust. "Soft" pretzels are served warm with a side of piping-hot beer cheese or stone ground mustard. "Hard" pretzels keep well and are typically eaten as a tavern food or by travelers. Sourdough - Made with a bit of dough from the previous batch, left to "go sour" to leaven the next. It has a heavy consistency and a hard, flaky crust. Tortilla - A flatbread from Maztica made from corn. Though Maztica disappeared in the Spellplague, the secret to making tortillas remains. Pasta Pasta is a Sembian food made from unleavened dough that is cooked in boiling water. They come in a variety of shapes and sizes, but the most common outside of Sembia is commonly called the noodle, a Chondathan word with Illuskan or Damaran roots. Bean curd noodles – Chewy, semi-transparent noodles from Shou Lung made from tofu. Egg noodle - A thick, savory noodle made with eggs. When shaped, these are often called Spätzle. Filled pasta - Similar to the more common dumpling but smaller, filled pasta is made with cheese, or less commonly meat, or rarely potato. Ravioli and tortellini are examples of filled pasta. Ramen – Curly, thin noodles found all across Kara-Tur. Soba - Fine, thin, vermicelli-like buckwheat noodles from Wa. Udon - Fat, white, and long noodles from Kozakura. Pastries Cookies - Also known as biscuits or biscotti, these are thin slices of sweet dough baked until they are crisp. They are often topped or filled with other delicious things, such as chocolate chips or sweet frosting. Because they travel well and take very little effort or ingredients, cookies are a staple of adventurer's rations and children's lunches throughout the heartlands. Éclair - A long pastry filled with a coffee- or chocolate-flavored crème pâtissière, custard or whipped cream, and topped with fondant icing. Other (less common) fillings include pistachio- and rum-flavoured custard, fruit-flavored fillings, or chestnut purée. Vegetables Vegetables are unfit for transporting, but some sort of vegetable can be grown pretty much anywhere. Because of this, there is a lot of vegetable variation by region. Elves and eladrin are known for their consumption of leafy vegetable, and dwarves almost exclusively eat root vegetables. Every other race falls somewhere in between. Parsnips - Parsnips are a mystery. They look like a carrot, and are cooked like a potato. No one has ever eaten one knowingly. Soup Borsch or Borscht - A cold beetroot soup originally made by the orcs of the Hordelands, it was handed down to the berserkers of Rashemen and is commonly served with a dollop of extra-fatty sour cream and a boiled potato. Salad A salad is a simple dish that is typically unfit to be served as a meal, instead served as an appetizer or digestive aid. Not all salads are made from vegetables, but rare is the salad that isn't. The most common type of salad is made from leaf lettuce, and is popular with humans and elves. Orcs, who are omnivores in name only, call the salad tree ejaculate. Caprese salad - An appetizer salad made from slices of mozzarella and tomato, basil leaves, and olive oil. Sauerkraut - This pickled cabbage salad is a mainstay for shield dwarves and übermenschen throughout the North. It is typically served hot, and flavored with animal fats or dark beer, and eaten more often as a condiment than a solitary dish. Sauces Usually made from ground vegetables, sauces are used to enhance the flavor of meats or cheeses. Dwarven mustard - A lightly-spiced, sweet stone ground mustard used to compliment smoked sausages. In some regions of Cormyr, it's widely believe to be a cure-all, aphrodisiac, and occasionally a personal lubricant. Hummus - A Calishite dish made from mashed chickpeas. Other herbs and spices are often added to enhance its natural flavor. Mustard - The king of sauces. Made from the seeds of the mustard plant and vinegar, this yellow or brown sauce has a pungent aroma and a sharp flavor and a varying level of sweetness and hotness. Fruits Because many fruits are enjoyed without any sort of preparation, they are a convenient food to find in the wilderness, though their short shelf life makes them difficult to transport without drying, which is detrimental to their nutritional value and flavor. Apples - Apple orchards are common throughout Cormyr, as one of the few fruits that can withstand the warm summers and cold winters of the Forest Kingdom. Most other fruits are imported through Sembia, from wherever they're grown. Desserts Because of their natural sweetness, prepared fruits typically serve as desserts rather than meals. Apple crisp - Also known as apple crumble, this apple and brown sugar dish is served in nearly every household and tavern throughout the heartlands. Strudel - Another dish made from apples and brown sugar, but baked into a flaky crust. Sorbet - A frozen dessert made with sweetened water and fruit. Dairy Cheese Cheese is a common table food made from milk fat. Many cultures produce cheese, varying wildly in flavor and consistency. Cheese is valued because it is more portable and preservable than milk. Arabellan Cheddar - The most popular cheddar cheese of the Sea of Fallen Stars. It is a sturdy, orange cheese that travels very well. Chessentan Lotus Cheese - Popular in Chessenta and in the empires on the southeastern side of the Sea of Fallen Stars. It is mixed with lotus flower petals, although there are other Chessentan cheeses that are mixed with rose or honeysuckle petals. Damarite Red - Also known as Bloodcheese, it comes from the lands of the Bloodstone. Made from goat's milk, it has a sharp, hearty, pungent tang. It travels well, owing to its heavy, black rind. Elturian Grey - Reminiscent of Blue Cheese, but has black veins. It is also known as stonework or dwarfcheese. It has a pungent flavor. Unfortunately, many knock-offs of Elturian Grey have come into being, sometimes using cow's milk instead of goat's milk. They try to sell them under similar names, such as Elturel Grey, Elturel Gray, etcetera, to trick the unwary. Farmer's Cheese - Also known as pot cheese or cottage cheese. It does not travel well, so is mostly consumed locally. It is usually wrapped in muslin. Green Calishite - Made by the Calishites, who mix curry into their cheeses to enhance the flavor. It has an aquamarine hue due to the curry. It is an extremely spicy cheese that can lay low the uninitiated. Mist Cheese - Produced in Loudwater Vale, it is a rich, soft white cheese that becomes translucent when sliced thinly. It is also called Ethereal Cheese by the elves. Nut Cheeses - Prevalent in Silverymoon, Mirabar, Sundabar, and the other cities of the savage frontier. They are a way to preserve un-shelled nuts (such as hickory nuts, walnuts, and chestnuts), which is done by grinding the nuts up and mixing them with cheese during the production of the cheese. Nut cheeses are typically rich and hard. Pepper Cheese - A tangy, supple cheese created by mixing southern spices with a mixture of goat and cow cheese. The rind is leathery and dotted with peppercorns. Tethyr is well-known for its excellent pepper cheese. Turmish Brick - A cheese mixed with the heavy red wine that is common among the Turmish. It is a sweet, crumbly, burgundy cheese, wrapped in red wax, and has a distinctive rectangular shape. It is popular as far north as Neverwinter. A 1-pound loaf costs about 4 silver pieces. Vilhon Blanc - A lighter cheese than Turmish Brick, since it is made with a lighter wine. It has a sweet, delicate flavor. The cheese is typically consumed locally, and is rarely found beyond the Sea of Stars or Sembia. Waterdhavian - Popular and common in Waterdeep. It is also called eyed cheese, holed cheese, or arrow-shot. This pale cheese has a sharp, tangy flavor. Yak Butter - This mild and delicate cream cheese is made from yak milk. It can be found from the Spine of the World to the Hordelands. Desserts Gelato - A frozen dessert that contains less butter cream than standard ice cream because it is meant to be eaten in warmer climates, such as Sembia or Calimshan. Ice cream - A frozen dessert commonly available in spring, when it's still cold enough to make but warm enough to want to eat. Unlike ubiquitous ice cream in the modern era, it is a rarity typically shared between young lovers. Beverages Beer Beer is an alcoholic beverage made from fermented grains and flavored with hops. They come in two main varieties: ales and lagers. Ales are made from top-fermenting yeast at room temperature and have a fuller flavor, while lagers are made from bottom-fermenting yeast at cold temperatures and have a crisper flavor. Bitter Black - A heavy stout from Arabel. Served at cellar temperature, it is jet black with a dark brown head of foam. Dragon's Breath - A Sembian brew of harsh temperament. It is often served with a platter of dark rye bread and strong cheese. Elminster's Choice - A dark, cloudy beer from Immersea with a heavy head and a smoky aftertaste. The name is likely a marketing ploy—Elminster will drink anything short of ram's piss. Golden Sands - This Calashite beer, like most southern brews, is a golden lager. It comes in several varieties: Basic, unadulterated; Gold, fortified with cacti and nettles, giving it a sharp aftertaste; Limon, piss and lemons, mixed; Orange, braced with orange and currant, it’s sweet with an acidic aftertaste. Iriaeboran North Brew - Widely regarded as an acquired taste, it has a dark amber color and a bitter aftertaste called "the bite of the north winds." Luiren's Best - Brewed by the halflings of Luiren, this hefty stout is as black as ink and nearly as thick as the snows of the Spine of the World. It has a sweet flavor and frothy head. Old One Eye - A fire-red lager stamped with the brand of a cyclops head. Shadowdark - A frothy ale from Shadowdale. It has a pale yellow foam atop a cloudy brown bubbly liquid and a light bitter taste. Suzale - Officially called Purple Dragon ale, is a top-shelf nutty brown ale first brewed for King Azoun IV of Cormyr but now sold across Faerûn. Its name is a pun on Suzail, the capital of Cormyr. Tanagyr's Stout - A heavy, pitch-black stout with a low, rich malt flavor. It is brewed in Zhentil Keep, but often ships in unmarked casks to avoid the stigma. Cider Kneecracker - A robust drink cloudy with heavy sediment. Purple Hill cider - A strong, clarified cider made from apples and accent fruits such as cherries, plums, quinces, and gooseberries from the Purple Hills orchards of Tethyr. Strongbeard cider - This is a strong dwarven cider common in the Silver Marches. Vilhon Cider - A sweet cider with apples, cherries, blueberries, and pears from the Vilhon Reach, it is best served piping hot with cinnamon or cloves. Wine Wine is an alcoholic beverage made from fermented fruits, usually grapes. They are flavored with a variety of herbs and a good vintage will fetch a high price in any market across Faerûn. Arabellan Dry - A dry red wine with woodsy undertones and a berrylike taste. Berduskan Dark - A heavy, sweet wine. It is so dark that it’s nearly black and has a high alcohol content. Blood Wine - A product of Aglarond, blood wine has a heavy body and deep-red tone. Its taste is lush and full with a slight after bite, made from shriveled grapes said to be possessed by the dead. Clarry - A pink blend of table wines sweetened with honey and spices. Evermead - The eladrin mead, against which all other drinks are compared. Made according to closely guarded traditions in Evermeet and aged for hundreds of years, rare is the bottle that touches human hands. Fire Wine - A thick, almost black wine made in the Old Empires. It is very strong and spicy, and is said to have medicinal qualities. Mead - Mead is a delicate, sweet wine made from honey. It is rarer and more difficult to produce than wines made from grapes or other fruits. The best common mead comes from Neverwinter bees. Saerloonian Special Vat - A pale red wine made from raspberry and strawberry. Saerloonian Glowfire - A pale chartreuse wine renowned for its faint luminescence, with hints of pears. Saerloonian Topaz - A yellow-amber wine with dry, nutty undertones and bold fruit overtones. Spiced wine - Common in Calimshan and Tethyr, spiced wine is a sovereign remedy for nausea, cough, and other common ailments. Flavors include raisin, cinnamon, fennel, anise, nutmeg, and clove. Table wine - Common table wine is a staple of taverns across Faerûn. Undermountain Alurlyath - A sweet white wine with a slightly nutty aftertaste. Its wonderful taste and full body are further enhanced for romantic evenings by its prominent silver and green luminescence. Few would guess this wine was brewed by the church of Lolth, and fewer still would be willing to drink it if they knew how it was made. Westgate Ruby - A bold crimson wine with a slightly acidic inclination. Winter Wine - A purplish-blue dessert wine made from frozen grapes in the North. Джерело: Meals Breakfast, plain 5 cp Breakfast, elaborate 2 s Dinner, plain 5sp Dinner, elaborate 1 ep Dinner, 7 course 2gp Supper, plain 3 sp Supper, elaborate 7 sp Common Drink(per pint) Ale 2 sp Ale, special 1 ep Beer, small 5 cp Beer, heavy 1 sp Mead 1 ep Mead, special brew 15 sp Wines(per pint) Table, local 1 ep Keoish golden 15 sp Sundish lilac 5 ep Umst white 1 gP Celene ruby 2gp Furyondian emerald pale 4gp Velunan fireamber 1 pp Brandies(per gill) Local lep Keoish 1 gP UmsKspecial aged) 3gp Liqueur Ulek Elixir, 1/2 gill 5gp


 
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