Bobber

Bobber is a placid herbivore that likes to spend time hiding in tide pools at low tide, emerging at high tide to feed. Here it is descending down away from shore during high tide, startling a longacrura in the process. [Creature design by Xord]

Basic Information

Anatomy

The bobber has feeding tendril feelers which are retractable. The bober's head has sloped down with its mouth now pointing directly to the ground. Its eyes have evolved into retractable eye-stalks and can barely make out objects, which helps guide it towards food or see incoming threats. It places its limbs laterally making it seem like a small disc when threatened. Hardened plates on its skin that serve as armor cover most of the exposed skin when it assumes this position. Its eyes, feelers, and tail retract while in this position as well.If for some reason the tide pool were to dry out the Bobber can survive for up to a few hours in its defensive pose, as the plates help it retain a bit of moisture. Plates similar to the ones in its skin have developed on the sides of its mouth to help break plant matter.

Genetics and Reproduction

They no longer wrestle to reproduce, now they broadcast spawn if they have enough nutrients at times when the tide is high. They have two sexes, but little sexual dimorphism, males being only marginally smaller than females.

Dietary Needs and Habits

Bobbers are herbivores and are some of the largest such animals in their habitat. While they prefer small sproutlings of boseo magno when they can find them, this is rare, instead they mostly subsist on tough leaves from wort melons.

Additional Information

Perception and Sensory Capabilities

Bobbers have decent eyesight and can detect predators a reasonable distance away, although by keeping to tide pools when they can and being bigger than most things in said tide pools they keep the risk of predation to a minimum.
EXTINCT
Genetic Ancestor(s)
Genetic Descendants
Scientific Name
Porcus armis
Origin/Ancestry
Pseudotetrapoda
Average Height
10 cm
Average Length
15 cm
Geographic Distribution

Comments

Please Login in order to comment!