Atlága Vekja

The language of the Fay is the one thing that unifies all different species of Fay. While they cannot agree or unite over anything else, the language is as natural to them as breathing.

It's remarkably similar to Ósleiðr, leading several linguists to believe that Atlága Vekja is the origin language of modern Ósleiðr. It insinuates that the vindral were, or worse, are Fay and brought the language with them when they crossed the Crimson Straits, seeking refuge among the Illim of the Blood Coast. Living among the Illim and later also the Kuna made the language evolve to modern Ósleiðr.

While this is the most likely theory of the events, it's generally not an appreciated viewpoint to have. The Kykr and the Fay are blood enemies. Pointing out the Fay ancestry of the vindral is not something that is done in civilised company. It's usually considered a grave insult, even though it's true.

Music credit goes to Christopher Larkin

Phonology

Atlága Vekja's phonology is almost identical to Ósleiðr, with a few notable differences.

Consonants

b

The b sound is pronounced exactly as in english. In some cases (when doubled inside a word, for instance) it shifts to be an aspirated p sound. "Kabbúr" -> "Kahpur"

d

The d sound is pronounced like the common western "d". It's a voiced alveolar stop. However, when inside a word and doubled ("dd") it becomes a regular english t sound. "dóddír" -> "dotir"

f

The letter "f" is a voiceless labiodental fricative precisely like the english f sound in "fish" and "feather".

g

A voiced velar stop, like in english "go" or "get". Never as in english "gem" or "geode".

h

The h sound largely depends on the following letter. On its own it's nothing more than an unrestricted release of air (voiceless glottal fricative), but depending on the following letter, it shifts. If nothing else is written below, it's just a voiceless aspiration (like in "helga"). It is however always pronounced if written.

ho, hu

In these cases, the h sound shifts more towards an hj sound, like in english "Houston".

hf

If what follows after the h sound is an f or a v, the "h" turns into a k. An unvoiced velar stop.

hl

If this combination appears at the beginning of a word, it's pronounced like a very aspirated L, but if it's found inside a word, it instead becomes a voiceless alveolar lateral affricate. A soft sound found in Icelandic and Welsh in modern day. It's IPA is ɬ.

j

The j sound is a palatal approximant, similar to how english would pronounce "y" in "yes". Never as "j" in "judge".

k

A voiceless velar stop, similar to how "k" and "c" are generally used interchangeably in english. "Cat", "case", "keen", "key" etc. When the letter is doubled inside a word, it's pronounced with a clear aspiration just before the letter. So "kk" would be pronounced "hk". "Ekk" -> "Ehk".

l

Alveolar lateral approximant. That's a mouthful. What it means is that the l sound is pronounced with the tounge tip touching the back of your front teeth and the hard alveola behind the teeth. However, if doubled it changes. So "ll" would be pronounced like a voiceless alveolar lateral affricate instead. This means that you make a sound similar to an l sound but you try to say "t" at the exact same time, expelling air over the sides of your tounge. This is the same sound as the "tlh" of qaj, or the double "ll" of modern icelandic.

ld

Whenever L and D stand close together, preceeded by a vowel, like in the word "eld" (to glow), the consonant cluster is pronounced lɬd, with a clear L followed by the lateral fricative ɬ and finally the D is de-voiced to a T.

m

Pronounced like in english.

n

Pronounced like in english. When combined with "g" it forms the uvular nasal "ng" sound. This sound may never start a word.

r

The r sound in Atlága Vekja is always an alveolar trill. It's never garbled like in french or as in american english.

s

Always pronounced like a voiceless alveolar fricative, never a voiced sound. So it's always "sit" or "say", not a z-like sound like in "zebra".

t

Pronounced the same as english does it except when doubled inside a word, in which case it, like "k", receives a clear exhale in front of it. "Attur" -> "Ahtur".

þ

This letter, thorn, represents the "th" sound in "thing", "think" and "theory". It's a voiceless dental fricative.

ð

Eth is the companion of the above letter, being the voiced dental fricative as in "this", "that" and "them".

v

The "v" is a labiodental fricative. For an english speaker, this sound is identical to the "v" in "vertical".

Vowels

Vowels in are somewhat complex, as they have short and long forms, denoted by an apostrophe (é). Think of it as the difference between the u sound in "root" (u) and "rude" (ú). The first being short, the second the long one.

a

The a sound is an open back unrounded vowel, pronounced like "a" in "father". When lengthened to "á" the sound is an "au" diphthong like in "hour".

æ

The ash is pronounced just like the "a" in the word "ash". It's a sound somewhere inbetween "a" and "e", called a near-open front unrounded vowel. Nordic speakers may recognize this sound as "ä".

e

The e sound is like english "pet". This is called an open-mid front unrounded vowel. When lengthened to "é" the letter becomes more similar to "ee" in "eerie".

i

The i sound is like in "heat", a close front unrounded vowel.

o

In linguistics you would call this a close back rounded vowel. It's difficult to describe in an English word, as the sound does not exist in English. When lengthened to "ó", the sound becomes similar to the "ou" in "dough". An ou-diphthong.

u

This is a close central unrounded vowel. Similar to how english might pronounce "root". When lengtened to "ú" the vowel sound becomes more pronounced and just a bit longer.

y

This sound is familiar to nordic speakers, but it's somewhat difficult to explain to an english speaker. It's similar to how a surfer would pronounced "dude". It's a sound you get when saying the "i" above, but rounding your lips. In linguistics it's called a close front rounded vowel.

ö

Close-mid front rounded vowel, very familiar to nordic speakers. Sometimes written as ø or œ in modern languages. The closest you'd get as an english speaker imagining this sound would be Arnold Schwarznegger trying to say "bird".

Dictionary

249 Words.
Successor Languages
Common Female Names
Afri
Álfeiðr
Ámóða
Arinfí
Baugheiðr
Bótfé
Bylgja
Dana
Eðna
Eir
Eistla
Gefjun
Gíslaug
Heigi
Helga
Hlín
Sága
Sjófn
Syn
Vár
Common Male Names
Báfur
Barki
Barkr
Dólgþrasi
Dfalar
Eiðr
Fjolnir
Gassi
Gaukr
Sigdan
Seigr
Vágur
Valar

Related reading

Fay
Species | Dec 14, 2020

The fay are creatures who live in the wild and are opposed to the kykr races. Magically adept, cunning and very dangerous.

 
Ósleiðr
Language | Dec 8, 2020

Language of Gimroen


Comments

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3 Oct, 2020 14:16

Hi! Not meaning to be rude, but in the 'O' section you spelt diphthong as diphthing xD

4 Oct, 2020 07:17

Whoops! Well, all my conlang articles could use an overhaul. They're old. :)

Author of prize-winning RPG settings Dark Shadows and Cinders of the Cataclysm. Designer of the narratively focused Celenia D10 RPG System.
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