Salty Desert

The Salty Desert is a large desert north of the Dry Reef. It gets its name from the salty lakes that dot the landscape.

Geography

The Salty Desert is primarily a very arid, dry, flat landscape. Towards the south it is more hilly, with several large sand dunes that have piled up over the years, and continue to get larger. In the centre, west and east are many lakes that have accumulated over many centuries, which contain an exceedingly high salt content, meaning many creatures cannot survive near them and drink for them.

Ecosystem

Very few species live in this environment, as the temperatures are way too hot and the salty lakes can't support much life. Those that do live here, all exist in close proximity to the several lakes, with specialised salt filters in their systems and incredibly durable taste buds, that allow them to extract the salt from the water and release it through their skin or other areas of their body.

Fauna & Flora

Tahi'i

Tahi'is are long legged, medium sized birds that spend their lives in and near the salty lakes. These birds are a bright yellow, with short necks, long legs, and a fat body. Tahi'is are the only bird species who can successfully drink the water from the salt lakes, they have special filters in their throats which catches the salt, and then they get released through their sweat.  

Salt Lake Fish

Salt lake fish are the only fish species to live in these lakes. They are a rare species, since they are only found in these lakes, but inside them they are relatively common. They are a bright blue, with red streaks on their sides, 3 fins on their backs, and a hooped tail fin. They provide food for the Tahi'i, and these fish actually survive on the salt.

History

The Salty desert was first discovered by the Ukari People, after several attempts to explore regions beyond their city. After several failed treks north through the Dry Reef, they made it to the salty desert. Attempting to drink the water from the lakes, they soon discovered this place was uninhabitable for them, despite the deceptive lakes there.
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Inhabiting Species

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