Lifestyles

Lifestyles

At the end of the night, every Crosser has to have a place to come home to. That place where they hang up their SMG, hackdeck, or drone. A character must select one of the lifestyles below to be their primary Lifestyle—this represents the general affluence of their day-to-day life. They may elect to pay other lifestyle costs as well to represent maintaining separate residences for alternate identity or “safehouse” purposes but must pay full cost on all lifestyles they maintain.
 

What's in a Lifestyle?

While I initially was forced into a discussion on safehouses and bolt holes a few years ago, I’ve found the subject interesting and have continued to think more about how we all live. Some of us have a house to go to, some are not so lucky, while others prefer hotels or living out of their car. Besides the physical aspect of a lifestyle, I asked myself, what else is there? As a community of crossers, are there common forms of entertainment? Security? Paranoid habits? So in a more philosophical approach, I present a discussion about what’s in a lifestyle. Fastjack, this one is for you.
— by DevGrrl
 
The first question is, what is a lifestyle? Simple—it’s how you live on a day-to-day basis, and is normally broken into socio/economic classes (Street, Low, Medium, Luxury, etc.). So the follow-up question is, what are the elements of a lifestyle? We can break a lifestyle down into a few elements. I count seven parts to a lifestyle: Comforts, Necessities, Security, Neighborhood, Entertainment, Services, and Assets. While a lifestyle should include work, we all know what we do for a living, so we’ll leave that out for now.
 

Comforts

A comfort is something that gets you out of the elements and protects you from the cold, extreme heat, rain, or snow that may be raging outside. Hypothermia, heat stroke, sepsis, poisoning, and infection are risks that can occur in if we’re outside too much, but these are mitigated by modern conveniences of housing. In our lovely world, urban temperatures tend to run two or three degrees warmer than those in nearby rural areas. Smog and acid rain are a constant reminder of how we screwed up the planets.   The world can be cruel; have you been denied a decent apartment, because you don’t have a Sin to validate your existence? So does what you do cause you to live with minimum comforts, or do you do what you do to gain more comforts? What I’ve seen is once you have some cash, a fake Sin is a necessity to get a dump of one’s own for almost everyone. How many of us support two different places of “comfort” (using the term loosely)? One for the comfortable Sinner, the other a hole-inthe-wall for the Crosser personality?   Everyone also needs a place to sleep. This can be difficult when you have to be wary of someone shanking you in the middle of the night for your shoes. With sleep deprivation, a Crosser can make mistakes or become slower to react. In this business, slow reaction equals death. So what do you do to achieve some semblance of adequate rest?
 

Necessities

Food and water—or in some people’s cases, whiskey and a smoke—are daily necessities, not only to survive, but to properly live. Potable water is scarce, even for urban dwellers. Contractual obligations of various water treatment and reclamation plants give preferential treatment to corporate premises first. In non-corporate areas, water quality, while within legal standards, leaves much to be desired.   Food most likely is greyscale soy paste and a bottle of the flavor of the day. An apple is out of the price range of most Crosser. So do you suffer the same cold meal every day, do you eat out to have some semblance of the real thing, or have you added assets to your lifestyle that help you get a little taste of something better?
 

Security

Security covers a broad sense of how much a deterrent your place is to unwanted guests and criminal activities (other than your own). Those living on the street can only protect what they can hold on to; others up the lifestyle chain have a physical location that can store and protect them rather than have it on their back all the time. Security can be further divided into Biotics, physical, and Matrix security, though mainly we’re talking physical security.
 

Neighborhood

Black Star has categorized the various neighborhoods based on security coverage. From AAA to Z, each rating represents the security investment in the area, with AAA being the most secure and Z being, well, “fend for yourself.” Their motivations for making those investments depend on the various premises and, if there are corporate assets, what the corporation is willing to pay outside their own territorial security. So where do you hang your hat? Are you a Barrens Brat or a Corporate one? Do you just find a place to park your car and sleep in it like a possessive rigger, or do you look for a motel vacancy?
 

Services

As part of your lifestyle, do you have your clothes drycleaned? Do you subscribe to a grid? There are many tasks that we can hire others to do for discreet purposes or to maintain a perception of “normalcy,” but which ones can you afford? Do they work under the table to provide their talents to the Sinless masses or do they conduct a shadow business?
 

Entertainment

When you are not sneaking through corporate halls or shooting people in the face for money, there are places you see and people you hang out with during downtime. Do you hang out a bar? Do you relax listening to a live orchestra? Do you have season tickets to watch a sports team? How do you relax? Some people are social and hang out with others, some are anti-social and play video games or some other RPG, and then there are some like Kane.
 
Now why am I being singled out here? I’m an ordinary guy. I prefer gambling, womanizing, driving fast cars, boats, jets, and blowing shit up. Explosions are more of a hobby. I’ve gotten pretty good in shaping a blast; kinda like fireworks, but with more kick.
— Kane
 

Assets

Your house is not just where you eat and sleep, it’s where you clean your gun, study magic, and maybe cook a little hooch. Assets are the tangible things that you can access. To everyone I’ve had to work with, access to showers are a must. It’s not your reputation that precedes you; it’s your three-day binge after the last paycheck. Another must is a nearby laundromat. Wearing dried blood to a meet-up can very easily send the wrong kind of message.
 
Not to crash DevGrrl’s work, but I’d like to throw in a few comments on fashion relating to lifestyle.
  • You will be treated as you appear. Try to blend in when you want to be invisible. Try to clash when you want attention. Try to be as ostentatious as possible when you want people to remember the clothing and not the person in them.
  • Never assume. That guy sleeping in the gutter in the beat-up lined coat drinking from a paper bag? Maybe he’s a street sam waiting for an excuse to show you his cyber enhancements and martial skills as he beats you into the ground.
— Plan9
 
Bolt holes and safehouses are common parts of a Crosser’s life. I’ve covered this before, but let’s sum up briefly:
Bolt holes are prearranged, cash-only paid spaces that you crawl into when the shit hits the fan. Bolt holes are usually set up in advance and then left to sit in whatever dark, unseen place they inhabit. A bolt hole isn’t some vacation home in the Bahamas—it’s more likely a cargo crate with food rations, a chemical toilet, and nothing but time on your hands to contemplate your sins and what to do next. A few people may share a bolt hole, but they might kill each other if they stay confined too long.
A safehouse is much like what you see in the vids. A little out-of-the way home used on a temporary basis to keep people safe as they are moved out of the city/planet or just until business is taken care of. Corporations and governments use them for witness protection or to offer them to Crossers to babysit assets. A safehouse is generally a step up from a bolt hole. In that they tend to be controlled by some House Master/ Madame who maintains whatever operating façade the safe house has constructed.
 

Game Information

A lifestyle is divided into four categories:
  • Comforts & Necessities (C&N)
  • Security (S)
  • Neighborhood (N)
  • Entertainment (E)
 
Each lifestyle has preset levels for these four categories, plus a set of points that can be spent to raise individual levels or buy entertainment options. Lifestyle categories cannot be lowered (unless, of course, you switch to a lower lifestyle level). Each lifestyle also has a category limit, listed in brackets next to the base level. The category cannot be raised higher than this limit. The Entertainment category does not have a level. Instead of being used to raise the level, points can be used to buy specific entertainment options.   Not all the points for each lifestyle need to be spent—each point can raise the monthly cost of the lifestyle, so players have to consider the benefits they get and the costs of gaining them. Each point spent on Comforts & Necessities, Security, or Neighborhood increases the Lifestyle cost by ten percent of the base lifestyle. Points spent in the Entertainment category vary in cost; depending on the associated lifestyle, they may not bring in additional costs (see Entertainment, as well as the information for each category).   Lifestyle options can be taken to get more points for the lifestyle or reduce one or more categories. The negative options cannot reduce the level of a category below 0; if an option would do that, it cannot be selected. A lifestyle can gain up to twice the starting lifestyle points when taking lifestyle options. Some positive options can increase the limit; this is noted with each option. Additionally, some lifestyles come with lifestyle options already included. These are noted in the lifestyle descriptions below.
 

Negligible Expenses

Your lifestyle does a whole lot of things for you. It covers rent, credit account fees, taxes (if you pay any at all), but also the costs of your daily Basic Expenses. This means, as long as you have an appropriate lifestyle, it is not necessary to tally all your minor expenses over the course of the campaign.   To make this somewhat easier, each lifestyle has a value in NuCred that represents the daily budget that you can spend without needing to take out your credstick or bank account. They are simply petty cash for you and have no impact on your actual finances. You and the gamemaster should keep an eye on this and determine if an expense goes over this limit or if you can just handwave it.   Expenses that go over your daily budget, need to be paid with your available funds as usual.  
Note that actual gear (such as weapons, armor, etc.) always needs to be paid for and can never be handwaved, as does everything that costs more than 100 NuCred, no matter your daily limit.
 

Lifestyle Types

Luxury

This lifestyle offers the best of everything: ritzy digs, lots of high-tech toys, the best food and drink, you name it. The character has a household staff, maid service, or sophisticated drones to do the chores. She gets by in her massive mansion, snazzy condo, or the penthouse suite in a top hotel. Home security is top-of-the line, with well-trained guards, and quick response times. Her home entertainment system is better than that in public theaters and accessible from anywhere in the home. She’s on the VIP list at several exclusive restaurants and clubs, both real and virtual.   This is the life for the high-stakes winners in the world of Swan Song: high-level executives, government big shots, Yarkuza bigwigs, and the few Crosser who pull off the big scores (and live to spend their pay).
 
DetailsValue
Monthly Cost100.000+ NC
Comforts & Necessities5 [7]
Security5 [8]
Neighborhood5 [7]
Points12
Daily Negligible Expenses250
 

High

A High lifestyle offers a roomy house or condo, good food, and the technology that makes life easy. The character may not have the same perks as the really big boys, but neither does she have as many people gunning for her. Her home is in a secure zone or protected by good, solid bribes to the local police contractor and gang boss. She has a housekeeping service or enough tech to take care of most chores. This is the life for the well-to-do on either side of the law: mid-level managers, senior Mob bosses, and the like.
 
DetailsValue
Monthly Cost10.000 NC
Comforts & Necessities4 [6]
Security4 [6]
Neighborhood5 [6]
Points6
Daily Negligible Expenses50
 

Middle

The Middle lifestyle offers a nice house or condo with lots of comforts. Characters with this lifestyle sometimes eat Nutrisoy as well as higher-priced natural food, but at least the autocook has a full suite of flavor faucets. This is the lifestyle of ordinary wage-earners or reasonably successful criminals.
 
DetailsValue
Monthly Cost5.000 NC
Comforts & Necessities3 [4]
Security3 [4]
Neighborhood4 [5]
Points4
Daily Negligible Expenses25
 

Low

With this lifestyle, the character has an apartment, and nobody is likely to bother her much as long as she keeps the door bolted. She can count on regular meals; the Nutrisoy may not taste great, but at least it’s hot. Power and water are available during assigned rationing periods. Security depends on how regular the payments to the local street gang are. Factory workers, petty crooks, and other folks stuck in a rut, just starting out, or down on their luck tend to have Low lifestyles.
 
DetailsValue
Monthly Cost2.000 NC
Comforts & Necessities2 [3]
Security2 [3]
Neighborhood2 [3]
Points3
Daily Negligible Expenses10
 

Squatter

Cost: 500 NuCred a month  
Life stinks for the squatter, and most of the time so does the character. She eats low-grade Nutrisoy and yeast, adding flavors with an eyedropper. Her  home is a squatted building, perhaps fixed up a bit, possibly even converted into barracks or divided into closet-sized rooms and shared with other squatters. Or maybe she just rents a coffin-sized sleep tank by the night. The only thing worse than the Squatter lifestyle is living on the streets.
 
DetailsValue
Monthly Cost500 NC
Comforts & Necessities1 [2]
Security1 [2]
Neighborhood1 [2]
Points2
Daily Negligible Expenses5
 

Streets

The character lives on the streets—or in the sewers, steam tunnels, condemned buildings, or whatever temporary flop she can get. Food is wherever the character finds it, bathing is a thing of the past, and the character’s only security is what she creates for herself. This lifestyle is the bottom of the ladder, inhabited by down-and-outers of all stripes. Hey pal, life ain’t all bad. It’s free.   In this category, increased levels in the Comforts & Necessities, Security, and Neighborhood categories result in a flat increase of 50 NC per level per month. Entertainments come with their normal listed costs, but any assets or services the player wants to purchase must be approved by the gamemaster, as they would have to be usable/accessible by the general public.
 
DetailsValue
Monthly Cost0 NC
Comforts & Necessities0 [1]
Security0 [1]
Neighborhood0 [1]
Points2
Daily Negligible Expenses0
 

Special Lifestyle Types

Not all Lifestyle Types represent standard apartment homes. Some also serve a special purpose or follow different rules. These Lifestyles usually require you to also have a standard Lifestyle in addition to them.
 

Bolt Hole

Living the Bolt Hole lifestyle is not pretty. A bolt hole s a space away from everything (people, grid, entertainment), and most often you’re stuck in it for a while because you need to stay out of sight. Add 4 to the threshold of any test involving someone trying to track a character who is living la vida Bolt Hole. In the Entertainment category, assets can be bought for a Bolt Hole, but not services or outings. Bolt holes only have a monthly cost when used. The character pays for the whole month, even if he used it for a day, or even just a few hours (though if you only need to hide for a few hours, use a no-tell motel already).
 
DetailsValue
Monthly Cost1.000 NC
Comforts & Necessities1 [2]
Security1 [4]
Neighborhood1 [4]
Points4
Built in OptionsNot a home
 

Traveller

This Lifestyle does not require an additional standard lifestyle.  
The traveler keeps mobile and packs light. Every month the traveler stays someplace new, often settling by chance. He may end up at a discounted honeymoon suite one month then a coffin motel the next. The player rolls 1D6 to determine the number of points allocated to the lifestyle for that month. The player can spend points to Comforts, Security, or Necessities. The rest of the premise is designed by gamemaster, including what Entertainment is or is not available. In the Entertainment category, only assets and services are added by the gamemaster, and they do not add to the cost of the lifestyle as they are provided by the establishment.
 
DetailsValue
Monthly Cost3.000 NC
Comforts & Necessities2 [4]
Security2 [4]
Neighborhood2 [4]
Points1d6 + 2
Daily Negligible Expenses25

Commercial

This lifestyle is a storefront, not a proper residence to live in. The lifestyle includes a location where the character can manufacture, fence, or repair goods. The location associated with this lifestyle includes permits to sell specific legal items. Because it’s a business that can make money, the monthly cost can vary. When renting an establishment, the character should make a Charisma + Negotiations [Social] test at the start of each month. Each net hit reduces the monthly cost by 1,000 for that month, representing the savvy business sense the character has while running the establishment.
 
DetailsValue
Monthly Cost8.000 NC
Comforts & Necessities3 [4]
Security3 [7]
Neighborhood4 [6]
Points4
 

Hospitalized

This special lifestyle applies only when a character is sick or injured. The character is confined to a hospital: a real one, a clinic equipped as a hospital, or a private location with the necessary equipment. Characters cannot own this lifestyle. They only pay for it until they get well or go broke, whichever comes first.
 
DetailsValue
Cost (Basic Care)500 NC / Day
Cost (Intensive Care)1.000 NC / Day
PointsCan't be owned
 

Paying the Bills

Obviously, a character has to pay the cost of their lifestyle(s) each month. Prepayments can be made for any number of months, but landlords are highly unlikely to refund the money later.   If a payment is missed there is a chance that the character will end up losing the lifestyle. Each time a payment is missed, roll 1d6. If the result is greater than the number of consecutive months of payments missed, then the landlord has let them slide, for now. Payments must still be made up later, however. If the die result is less than or equal to the number of months missed, the character is out the door. If this is not the primary lifestyle, then the unit is lost. If the character missed payments on their primary lifestyle, downgrade the lifestyle one level. This represents the character having some items repossessed, seized, and/or sold in order to forcibly pay debts, and they are evicted from wherever they are living. At the gamemaster’s discretion, the character may also still owe some of the back rent to some kind of creditor. This may be a legit bank or loan company, or someone more unscrupulous such as a loan shark or criminal syndicate.   Overall, dealing with the character’s lifestyle is more of a roleplaying opportunity than anything else. Gamemasters and players are encouraged to make an interesting and dramatic story out of the situation.
 

Buying a Lifestyle

A character can permanently buy a given lifestyle by making a payment equal to 100 months’ upkeep. For example, ten million NuCred buys a permanent life of luxury. This sum represents investments, trust funds, and so on that take care of payments.   Nothing in life is certain, however. A character can lose a permanent lifestyle through an enemy’s action or through sheer bad luck. A hacker can rip investments to shreds, or enemies can blow real estate holdings into scrap. These things depend on how the character’s story unfolds, not on how much is her bank account at the time. If a player wishes, her character can sell a permanent lifestyle of Middle or better. If the character has a couple of months to broker a legitimate deal, roll 2D6. Multiply the result by 10 percent to determine what percent of the purchase price the character gets paid for her various holdings. If the character doesn’t have the SINner quality, roll only 1D6. Also roll 1D6 if the character must dump her home and possessions fast or through an agent because she is on the run.
 

Team Lifestyles

If a team is particularly tight-knit and lives together (or if a few members of a team want to shack up), they can buy a joint team lifestyle. The cost is an extra ten percent per additional person. If the team is purchasing a Low Lifestyle or higher, one member of the team has to be the tenant of record. This is the one stuck with the debt if the team doesn’t keep up payments.
 

Lifestyle Categories

Comforts & Necessities

Comforts & Necessities are an integral part of any lifestyle. If a Crosser doesn’t get a good night’s rest and a belly full of nutrient-added soy, he’ll eventually end up at the morgue. This is because of the possibility of fatigue damage (Damage Types).   At the beginning of most game sessions, characters roll to resist fatigue damage, simulating how much rest they have been able to get in their quarters. Characters do not, however, have to make this roll if the new session directly continues an adventure from the previous one and they have not had a chance to rest in whatever domicile is part of their lifestyle. Base Fatigue damage that characters must resist is 6 Strain. For each level in the Comforts & Necessities category, reduce the DV by 2.   Additional factors may affect the damage the character must resist. For example, having allergies can be a hassle, especially food allergies where choices are limited. Allergies to things found in the environment (such as pollution, ultraviolet rays, plastic, etc.) increase the Fatigue damage characters must resist by 1 per level above mild for common allergies and 1 per level above moderate for uncommon allergies if the Comforts & Necessities category of the lifestyle is level three or lower. Allergies to foods can be problematic, as some special dietary requirements may not be available in all lifestyles. Allergies to common foodstuffs (soy, mycoprotein, etc.) also increase the fatigue damage value by 1 per level above mild if the Comforts & Necessities category of the lifestyle is level 3 or lower. For uncommon allergies, the damage value increases by 1 if the allergy is Severe, 2 if it is Extreme.
 

Security

Security covers a broad sense of how much a deterrent your place is to unwanted guests and criminal activities other than your own. Those living on the street can only protect what they can hold on to, while people higher up the lifestyle food chain have a physical location that can store and protect their stuff, rather than having to carry it all around with them all the time. Each point into security reduces the risk of theft of the character’s stuff at home.   The exact details of when this comes into play are left up to the gamemaster, but one example is a Security Test representing how well the place is watched by security officers, alarms, and other security measures. If anyone attempts a burglary at the character’s domicile while the character is away, roll a dice pool of (Security level x 2) against the Sneaking + Agility of the burglars. If the Security wins the test, security officers have noticed the attempt, or a home alarm has been triggered, or some other event has occurred to indicate that the burglars ran afoul of the security measures without the player having to do a thing.   The gamemaster should also look at the rare items the character owns compared to the security of the lifestyle. If the item’s Availability is more than twice the Security level, chances are someone/thing will notice the item and want to steal it. The greater the discrepancy, the more likely the item will be targeted. The gamemaster is encouraged to decide and roleplay out such events, especially if it helps with the adventure/campaign. Alternatively, the gamemaster can abstract the potential for attempted theft with a test using a dice pool equal to the difference between the minimum Security level of a lifestyle required and the actual Security level purchased by the player. For each hit, the player must pay one percent of the monthly cost of the lifestyle to replace stolen goods or repair damaged properly (or pay insurance premiums that help them deal with such things). Nothing exceedingly valuable should go missing in this test. Burglary of a truly valuable item requires the Security Test detailed above.
 

Neighborhood

Neighborhood is an abstract category covering what is acceptable behavior, safety, and general atmosphere. In the World of Swan Song, Neighborhood Zone classifications have been developed to give a quick snapshot of an area and the typical lifestyles in it. The Neighborhood Zone table lists those classifications. Between Neighborhood and Security, the gamemaster and player should be able to develop a clear picture of what a neighborhood feels and looks like, and the gamemaster can then flesh it out.   For example, a character might find that the D Zone he’s living in has been taken over by gangers or the Mafia when a made man knocks on the character’s door asking for a cup of sugar substitute. The gamemaster should consider how well the character’s activities and profession fit into the neighborhood. Guns and drugs in any zone below C may not make the neighbors blink an eye, but zone A or above, someone will probably say something. To avoid problems, the gamemaster could impose a higher lifestyle cost to account for the bribes the character has to pay to get people to look the other way.
 
Neighborhood Zone Response Time* Description
0 Z 2d6 Hours This is a lawless area deep in the heart of many barrens. Criminal organizations and gangs can sometimes feel uneasy here. Savage beast from the wild lands might run wild here. Unless it’s a big incident, most security providers will find routes to avoid going through Z zones. Any type of residence can be found, though it will be in serious disrepair.
1 E 1d6 Hours These are low-rent/industrial districts mostly filled with SINless squatters and the homeless. Heavy or toxic industrial facilities are included in E Zones. Security providers consider SINless “nonpeople” for the purposes of their work, which means if it’s easier to solve a problem by shooting them, they will.
2 D 1d6 x 12 Minutes You can find these zones in the area between industrial and residential districts where the exposure to pollution is a little better than those who live right next to the smoke-churning factories. Or at least, that’s what the residents will tell you. Patrols come through this area, only because it’s inconvenient to go around. D zones can include run-down business district, abandoned warehouses, forgotten tenements, landfills, freeway junctions, old cemeteries, and large parking lots.
3 C 1d6 x 10 Minutes The district has seen better days and could use more than just a paint job to bring it up to snuff. You can find low- rent residences, storage facilities, small bodegas, and other similar sites in these zones.
4 B 1d6 x 5 Minutes This is where the middle class lives, along with the commercial places they use and the occasional light industrial facility.
5 A 2d6 +3 Minutes This features high-class residences and corporate buildings.
6 AA 1d6 +4 Minutes Here you’ll find luxury-class residences and posh commercial places. If you ask the price, you can’t afford to live here.
7 AAA 1d6 Minutes Corporate headquarters. Skyraker condos. And the occasional private islands. This is where the world’s wealthiest pay to make sure they’re kept safe.
  [container:note-box] * This represents the amount of time it takes law enforcement, fire, and medical services to respond to emergency calls (note that medical response times might vary based on the services an individual is paying for).
 

Entertainment

This category covers things that entertain, make life easier, and in general give the character things to do and people to see. Each of these perks has a monthly monetary cost and a point cost, as well as a minimum “no cost” lifestyle. If the player purchases a lifestyle that meets or is greater (in base expense) than the no cost lifestyle, then the element can be added without extra NuCred costs, though points must still be spent (the financial costs are assumed to be covered in the overall lifestyle expense).   A minimum lifestyle of “None” means that no lifestyle can cover the cost of this item; if the player wants it, they need to pony up. Some entertainment choices bring advantages, listed in each description. Note that generally each item can only be purchased once per domicile, unless the description says otherwise. These advantages also cannot be used unless the character is actively using the domicile. If, for example, they are paying for an apartment on Prometheon but is out on Athenea on a job, the items and advantages tied to the Prometheon location do not apply.   There are three types of Entertainments: Assets, which are either physical characteristics of the domicile or facilities that are available nearby; Services, which are, well, services that the character can receive at home or in the neighborhood; and Outings, which represent opportunities in the neighborhood to go out and do things.
  Show Entertainment Options

Armory

Quite popular among Crossers is a room dedicated to guns. Ammo and one stock firearm duplicating one that the character purchased at the character creation are on hand in this room. If the character has purchased a toolkit that can work on the particular weapon, 1 point of Accuracy or ARP can be repaired per week without additional cost. A point of Reach can also be repaired in two weeks.
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost2
Monthly Cost1.000 NC
Minimum LifestyleHigh
 

Cleaning Service

Cleaning services (100 NC) include tidying up the home and cleaning/mending clothes sent to them with some semblance of privacy guarantee. This service can be purchased several times for similar services such as landscape care, beauty salon/barber, and basic car cleaning/maintenance. These services provide a reasonable amount of privacy. These services can also include some specific enhancements. Biotic-sensitive services (200 NC) destroy biomaterials of the individual that may be left behind on clothing or in a car/premise. Pollution-sensitive services (400 NC) use less harsh chemicals and natural materials taking care of the character’s clothes or cleaning the home. This reduces Fatigue damage from environmental allergies the C&I by 1.
 
TypeService
Point Cost1
Monthly CostSpecial
Minimum LifestyleHigh

Discreet Cleaning Service

You know of an organization that can go to a premise and patch bullet holes, wash out blood stains, and cleanse the Element Zero in under twenty-four hours (as long as it’s not a public or corporate place). At the listed cost, they will handle only one body disposal a month. If this limit is exceeded, the company may drop the character as a client. This service is tied to the character, so it does not end when they change lifestyles, as long as they keep paying the cost.
 
TypeService
Point Cost4
Monthly Cost10.000 NC
Minimum LifestyleNone
 

Discreet Deliveryman / Candyman

You know a guy who can pick up and deliver any legal item (within reason) without being noticed to your domicile. It may be one of many bicycle couriers dashing over streets or a street urchin who can avoid many observers—either way, the delivery service is subtle enough to not be noticed by observers. The Discreet Deliveryman/Candyman has a dice pool of 14 for Sneaking Tests and a Karma Rating of 4. They only cover delivering an item—the purchase of the item must be accomplished through normal means. Time to deliver is based on original price of the item. While the deliveryman can handle takeout food service and legal items with an Availability of 8 or less, the candyman can handle items up to Availability of 16, as well as restricted and illegal items.
 
TypeService
Point Cost3
Monthly Cost100 / 1.000 NC
Minimum LifestyleNone

Garage

A garage is a large covered area with enough space to park and maintain a single vehicle. With the purchase of a Shop related to the vehicle, 1 damage to the vehicle can be repaired per week without additional financial cost, as the cost is absorbed by the lifestyle. Purchasing a Facility increases the repair rate to 2 damage. Use the Build and Repair rules for quicker repairs. This asset can be purchased more than once so that multiple vehicles can be serviced at the same time. The points cost, monthly NuCred cost, and minimum lifestyle depend on the nature of the vehicle, as listed in the table.
 
Vehicle Points Monthly Cost Minimum Lifestyle
Spacecraft 5 50.000 NC None
Aircraft 4 10.000 NC Luxury
Watercraft 3 5.000 NC High
Car (Body 5 or greater) 2 100 NC Medium
Car (Body 4 or less) 1 50 NC Medium

Greenhouse

Your home has a small plot of land or a couple of pots of dirt to grow carrots, tomatoes, herbs, wheatgrass, etc. to accentuate daily meals. Reduce the environmental damage due to food allergies by 1.
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost2
Monthly Cost500 NC
Minimum LifestyleHigh
 

Grid Subscription

Nobody “downloads” or “records” their favorite song or movie any more. It’s all based on subscriptions and purchases within the Matrix and stored virtually on a grid. Commlinks and home entertainment systems connect you wirelessly to everything from photos you’ve taken to corporate-sponsored lines of entertainment that you can watch whenever you want. Without a grid subscription, you might as well have a throwback commlink with an antique external storage device, as the public grid only has vid shows from like two seasons ago.
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost1
Monthly Cost50 NC
Minimum LifestyleMedium
 

Gym

Weights, treadmill, elliptical quadrilateral, gradient tricycle, or whatever device is trending. These devices help the character get physically fit, and they reduce the training time to improve physical stats by twenty percent.
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost2
Monthly Cost300 NC
Minimum LifestyleMedium
 

Indoor Arboretum

An increasing number of domiciles have a room dedicated to living vegetation. For the mundane, it’s a room free of pollutants as the plants absorb them from the air. Having this asset reduces the Comforts & Necessities environmental damage due to pollution allergies by 1 point.
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost2
Monthly Cost500 NC
Minimum LifestyleHigh
 

Local Bar Patron

You have a bar that you frequent where everybody knows you. Your lifestyle covers the food and drinks from this spot. You may get an occasional free drink there from your buddies. Similar habitual locations include restaurants and fast-food joints. One specific location is chosen when this entertainment option is selected, and the feature can be purchased more than once to add different locations.  
TypeOuting
Point Cost1
Monthly Cost25 NC
Minimum LifestyleLow

Merchandise: Goods (Specific Item)

This location will provide some sort of legal goods for sale. The item to be sold must be selected when this option is purchased. The base Availability for the selected item is 3 for gear and low quality for miscellaneous items. For better quality or higher availability, more points must be spent to buy this service, with the maximum being 4 points to sell a luxury-quality item. Each point also adds 2 to the Availability of the item that can be sold on the premises. The character may pick up said item at a ten percent discount and reduce the interval on the Extended Test to locate the item by 1 category (days to hours, and hours to “it’s on the shelf over there”).
 
TypeService
Point Cost1+
Monthly Cost10.000 NC
Minimum LifestyleCommercial
 

Merchandise: Pawn Shop / Thrift Store

Any used legal goods can be fenced at this location. Items can be sold within a week provided that the player sells the item at fifteen percent of the normal purchase price.
 
TypeService
Point Cost2
Monthly Cost10.000 NC
Minimum LifestyleCommercial
 

Merchandise: Used Goods (Specific Item)

This location can be used to fence one specific item, which must be selected when this option is purchased. When attempting to fence an item, reduce the threshold to find a buyer by half. Instead of negotiating a price, you can immediately sell items at twenty-five percent of the purchase price.
 
TypeService
Point Cost2
Monthly Cost10.000 NC
Minimum LifestyleCommercial
 

Panic Room

This location has a reinforced room that goes beyond average material standards. It has a three-meter by three-meter room constructed with structural material with a Rating 5 locking mechanism
.  
TypeAsset
Point Cost2
Monthly Cost1.000 NC
Minimum LifestyleHigh

Patron of the Arts

Surprising as it seems, you can walk through the front door of some exclusive places, avoiding the line while other suckers have to stand there and buy tickets. Your membership privileges don’t allow you to bring in weapons, but you receive preferred member treatment for perks like front-row seats, or “members only” specials, or and limited suite or luxury box access. This entertainment option covers places such as the zoo, Dante’s Inferno, sports events, museum memberships, and more. The whole expense of the outing, including food and drink, is covered by the lifestyle. One specific entertainment venue is chosen each time this perk is purchased. The cost and nature of this perk varies based on the lifestyle to which it is attached. Virtual Funland and more upscale theme parks cost more monthly, as do private club memberships, and they tend to be bought by people with higher lifestyles. This choice can be purchased more than once for different locations, artists, sports teams, or what-have-you.
 
Type Points Monthly Cost Minimum Lifestyle
Rock Concerts / Sport Events 1 100 NC Medium
Private Club Membership (Dante's, 77, ...) 1 200 NC High
Public Entertainment (Zoo, Museum, ...) 1 75 NC Low
Theme Parks (Virtual Funland) 1 100 NC Medium

Private Room

This is a simple empty, two-meter-by-two-meter space that has been built out of the view of passers by. It provides concealability (–4 dice pool penalty for Perception Tests to notice a person in the room from the outside) and full cover. A barricaded alley or abandoned cars are examples things that could serve as a private room for people who do not live in an actual building. For people in a building, this is simply a room cleverly placed to be difficult to see.
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost1
Monthly Cost20 NC
Minimum LifestyleSquatter
 

Public Transportation

You have a monthly pass to access public transportation in your region. This can involve taking a bus, trolley, subway, ferry, or any combination of them. This means from most places within the city you have transportation access to your destination, with the caveat that it’s not as fast as you may like it. This is purchased once per city, provided it has public transportation.
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost1
Monthly Cost50 NC
Minimum LifestyleLow
 

Railway Pass

You have a monthly pass to use the light rail or mag-train to travel between two relatively close sprawls. This includes border-crossing fees when relevant. This is purchased for two city locations, provided there is a railway connecting them.
 
TypeService
Point Cost1
Monthly Cost75 NC
Minimum LifestyleMedium
 

Shooting Range

There’s a place you can go where you can shoot guns and not bother the neighbors. Reduce training time with a firearm skill by ten percent.
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost2
Monthly Cost500 NC
Minimum LifestyleHigh
 

Soy Processing Unit

You have a SOTA set of kitchen devices. Soy, krill, and mycoprotein are architecturally “printed” into something that looks and tastes like close to the real thing. Reduce the potential environmental damage tied to Comforts & Necessities due to food allergies by 1.
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost1
Monthly Cost20 NC
Minimum LifestyleMedium
 

Sports Court (Small) [Sport]

This gives the domicile a tennis court, basketball court, driving range, bowling alley, or something like that. The character has a physical place to play at home, saving the need to go out. This reduces training time with the acrobatics, athletics or running skill by ten percent.
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost2
Monthly Cost300 NC
Minimum LifestyleHigh

Swimming Pool

You have every child’s dream—a swimming pool in your home. It may not be a huge pool, but it’s bigger than a bathtub, clean, and deep enough to use for relaxation and exercise.
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost1
Monthly Cost100 NC
Minimum LifestyleMedium
 

Walk-In Freezer

While this chilled room is mainly used for food storage, it can also store "things" that need to stay cold while six-foot holes are dug as more permanent resting places.
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost1
Monthly Cost1.000 NC
Minimum LifestyleCommercial
 

Workshop / Facility

This is space dedicated to the character’s gear-related work. Power, ventilation, shelving, etc. are there to perform any tasks related to working with an appropriate build and repair skill. Combined with a Shop or Facility, gear/weapons associated with the workshop can be repaired at 1 damage per week without additional cost (2 with a Facility).
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost2
Monthly Cost2.500 NC
Minimum LifestyleMedium; must include Commercial
 

Yard

You have a piece of outdoor ground that you can consider your own. The lot is roughly fifty to two hundred square meters of empty space, depending on the lifestyle. This could be a backyard to a home, an empty lot, or abandoned parking lot. It’s large enough to park a car, or put up a small kiddy pool. This asset can be purchased more than once to increase the size of the yard.
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost2
Monthly Cost50 NC
Minimum LifestyleLow
 

Zen Den / Bat Cave

Everyone has to have a place to show off their cool stuff, a place where they are surrounded by things that are fun and comfortable. The zen den is a room dedicated to the hobbies of the character. It could be a physical collection of vintage bottles, a video set linked to megapulses worth of vid movies, an immersive sports-viewing room, or what-have-you. The zen den provides a +1 dice pool bonus on tests involving relevant Interest Knowledge Skills when the character is at home.   The bat cave is similar, though geared more toward legwork. Tools, agent-driven computer simulations, and/or inspirational music provide a helpful atmosphere for the character in solving puzzles. With the purchase of a Kit related to a selected Academic Skill, the bat cave provides a +1 dice pool bonus to tests involving relevant Academic Knowledge Skills made while the character is at home. Separate Kits can be purchased for each Academic Skill, and the bat cave can hold up to three Kits.
 
TypeAsset
Point Cost2
Monthly Cost100 NC
Minimum LifestyleMedium

 
 

Lifestyle Options

Not every location is exactly the same. One may have a distinct advantage or disadvantage over another; it’s all about the location. The following options can be selected for any of the lifestyles except Streets or Hospitalized. The gamemaster may disallow any of these options if they wouldn’t be plausible for the character’s described residence, or if there is no chance of the bonus or penalty listed ever coming into play.
  Show Lifestyle Options

Angry Drunk Reputation (Negative)

Add 1 point to the base lifestyle associated with this quality.  
You have a bad reputation for causing or being in fights. This has caused many bars to put your picture in their system or ban you completely. The character cannot have any Bar Patron or Patron of the Arts (Private Club) entertainment options attached to any lifestyle, This option may cause issues for the character when meeting Mr. Johnson. Once the character gets away from the neighborhood where they live, though, they leave the bad reputation behind.
 

Corporate Owned (Positive)

Reduce the available points of the lifestyle by 3.  
This domicile is within the jurisdiction of a corporation, such as a wageslave housing complex or arcology. Increase both the Comforts & Necessities value and limit of the location by 1. The Security level and limit are also increased by 1 from the base lifestyle. If the base lifestyle doesn’t have 3 points to start with, then it can’t be corporate owned. To use this quality, characters must have a corporate or limited corporate Sin.
 

Cramped (Negative)

Cost: -10% of the lifestyle cost  
It’s not small, it’s just cozy—or at least that’s what the landlord said. There is just enough space in your place to live, and not do a whole lot else. Forget doing any hobbies or work, or even stretching your legs when you sit down—there just isn’t the room. Any Skill tests tied to Logic have their Limit reduced by 2 (to a minimum of 1) when performed in this space.
 

Dangerous Area (Negative)

Cost: +-20% of the lifestyle cost  
Isn’t that where a guy got shot yesterday? The area you live in is particularly dangerous and prone to crime, including violence. Security and law enforcement are overwhelmed in the area, so will only respond to the most desperate need and will often be slower to respond. People in the area generally look out for themselves. Hey, at least your rent is cheaper, just don’t keep any fancy stuff in your place. Any High Threat Response or other similar security response rolls are made as if this area were one level lower than it actually is.
 

Extra Secure (Positive)

Cost: +20% of the lifestyle cost  
Security where you live is particularly tight. The neighborhood may be surrounded by a wall, guarded by vigilant security contractors, patrolled by an altruistic gang, or near some particularly powerful individual that no one wants to mess with. Whatever the case, the security of the living space is above average for the area. All High Threat Response and other security response rolls are made at one level better than the area would normally be. It covers security for all assets purchased for a lifestyle without additional cost.
 

Hotel California (Negative)

Add 1 point to the base lifestyle.  
There’s a limited window when someone can enter or leave the premises. The rest of the time, the character is stuck and can only use the resources the place has. The time period of lockdown should be agreed upon between the gamemaster and player and should not be too long lest the character become MIA while the rest of the team continue missions.
 

Maid is Out (Negative)

Add 1 point to the base lifestyle.  
This location has not been cleaned recently. Or ever. Layers of trash and mold cover most surfaces. Reduce the limit of Comforts &Necessities by 1. The Cleaning Service option cannot be purchased for this location. Increase the DV of environmental fatigue by 1 for environmental allergies.
 

Not a Home (Negative)

Add 1 point to the base lifestyle.  
This location was not designed for habitation. There’s no plumbing and possibly no privacy, lacking standard features such as interior walls. This can be as simple as a cargo container or rented space at a strip mall. Reduce the limit of Comforts &Necessities by 1.

Obscure / Difficult to Find (Negative)

Cost: +10% of the lifestyle cost. Add 1 point to the base lifestyle.  
You live where? The corner of what and what? Your place is particularly difficult to find or in an obscure, not-well-known area of the city. Everyone needs directions, or a good map, to find your place and even then they often get lost. You’ve given up on the pizza delivery guy, you just meet him at the nearest intersection. Any Sneaking Skill tests (owner of the property excluded) made in the vicinity of the residence are made with a –2 penalty. Cannot have a Discreet Deliveryman or Candyman entertainment options attached to this lifestyle.
 

One Good Thing about this Place (Positive)

No matter where the character ends up, he always has one entertainment choice guaranteed while he’s there. With the selection of this option, the player chooses one entertainment asset worth either one or two points. This choice is always available at the domicile as long as the monthly cost is paid. This quality can only be tied to the Traveler lifestyle.
 

Safehouse (Positive)

Cost: +500 NuCred a month  
This premise is designated as a safehouse. As such, the character has no control over what Entertainment options are factored into the place, meaning they cannot purchase Entertainment assets for a safehouse, though other assets can be added. Subtract 4 from the dice pool of anyone trying to track the subject while they reside in a safehouse. The character can freely use the place, but the owner/director has rules that guests must obey while there. The gamemaster decides the house rules (curfew, weapons allowed, clothing restrictions, etc.).
 

Safety Third (Negative)

Add 1 point to the base lifestyle.  
While there is space for a workshop or facility on the premises, it’s not the best of places to work in. In fact, there’s always a risk to your health (for example, no ventilation, wet floor, critters). Reduce the number of 1s needed for a glitch by one (so that if the character would normally need four 1s to glitch, he now only needs three). Characters must have purchased a Shop or Facility along with the Garage or Workshop Asset. Applies to a single asset (Garage or Workshop). This quality can be taken more than once per asset.
 

Special Work Area (Positive)

Cost: +1.000 NuCred a month  
The place has a workshop, garage, office, studio, or other kind of large area that can hold a specialized work space of some kind. Specialized equipment can be set up “just the way you like it” so tasks can be accomplished quickly and easily. Skill checks relevant to the setting have their Limit increased by 2 when  performed in this space.   Applies to a single asset (Garage or Workshop). Can be purchased more than once per lifestyle. The per month additional cost applies each time this is purchased, as does the +2 bonus to the Limit for relevant skill tests performed in the area.
 

Thrifty (Negative)

Reduce the points available by 2 and the monthly cost by 1.000 NuCred.  
So what if the shower is lukewarm and the walls are paper thin? You got a great deal on this place. Only available for the traveler lifestyle.
 

W Zone (Negative)

Add 1 point to the base lifestyle.  
W Zone is sort of like a Z zone, but the W stands for wilderness. This location is way outside any urban area, so the grid is spotty, power is not publicly provided, and unless you have a car, you’re walkin’, as the nearest public transportation is two hours away. Reduce the Neighborhood level by 1 and increase the security response by 1d6 hours.

 
 

Fashion by Lifestyle

There are certain styles of clothes that come with each lifestyle; for each month of lifestyle purchased, characters get one set of clothes. If they want more, they have to buy them separately.   If the character wants to make an impression or go slumming, they should purchase clothing that matches that lifestyle. There is also a social stigma of not dressing the part. When you are going to an interview with Mr. Johnson, you should be wearing clothes at the same social level as Mr. Johnson or at least the same level as the locale where you are meeting him. Most often, Mr. Johnson meets at some highclass restaurant while he is dressed for success. The gamemaster may opt to impose a dice-pool penalty depending on how far the team’s dress is from where it should be.   For additional information on clothing see Armor & Clothing.
 
Robin and her merry gang have just gotten their first meet with Mr. Johnson at a posh restaurant. Robin puts on her special little black dress made with real silk (Luxury class). As she arrives, she finds that her gang must have come from a combat biker rally, as they are wearing faux-black leather and smelling of cheap smokes and sweat. So as to not cause embarrassment (her little gang would have penalized her negotiations, leaving her to explain to Mr. Johnson that they really are professionals and/or apologize), she threatens them all with bodily harm if they don’t go home and come back clean and properly attired.

Street and Squatter

Vendingwear is a cheap option for people looking for modest covering, and if you have a Street or Squatter lifestyle, that’s what you get. Vendingwear is recycled plastic that is shredded and woven into fabric (with an elastic band for pants, socks, and underwear). It has no options except for color (avocado green or dirt brown) and size (small, medium, large, and extra-large). Many people who live on the street turn in bottles or old vendingwear to get new clothes.   Prices range from 5 to 25 NuCred.
 

Low

Besides thrift stores selling cast-off clothes of the middle class, Beaux Retail (Mitsukaya) has simple casual (50 NC) to business (100 NC) clothing made from industrial polymers and put together by the cheapest labor available.   Prices range from 50 to 200 NuCred.

Medium

For business, you can go as high as Wellington Bros (ShinWare Fashion for casual wear, Vashon Island (ShinWare Fashion) and Victory (Ares) won’t break the bank. Prices range from 200 to 500 NuCred.
 

High

A High lifestyle can always default to the original Très Chic Clothing for business or casual wear.   Prices range from 500 to 1.500 NuCred.
 

Luxury

Designer clothes are a must for people living the Luxury lifestyle. This includes designs from artists such as Berwick (Mortimer of London), Armanté (Zoë), and Jean-Paul.   Prices range from 2.000 to 5.000 NuCred (or more).
 

Sample Lifestyle Locations

The Cube, Coffin Hotel

Sure, the only space you can really call your own is a tube only slightly longer and wider than you are, but it’s padded, warm, and dry, and you can lock it against intruders. Plus, food and bathroom facilities are available nearby. It’s not luxurious, but it has the basic amenities you need to live, and sometimes they’re even clean.
 
Cost70 NC a night
Comforts & Necessities2
Security2
Neighborhood2
Entertainment0
 

The Millenium, Standard Hotel

For those times when you absolutely need to spend more in a night than many people pay for rent in a month, the Millennium Hotel is there for you. The mattress is pillow-topped, the furniture is real wood, and the staff is capable of acting like they are genuinely happy to see you. Everything you could possibly want is a phone call away. The worst part of your stay will be having to go back to reality at the end of it.
 
Cost450 NC a night
Comforts & Necessities5
Security5
Neighborhood6
Entertainment3
Entertainment AssetsGym, Indoor Arboretum, Swimming Pool
 

Red Light District Safehouse

This isn’t the showiest brothel in the red-light district - that would only draw attention. This is an out-of-theway shack, where a weary madam holds court in a dingy front room. A dim hallway leads to three rooms where the working girls ply their trade. The secret, though, is the broom closet at the end of the hall—there’s a trap door in the ceiling and a rope ladder that drops down, providing access to a small attic space above the brothel. A small group of people can rest there, away from the prying eyes of civilization—and most of the accompanying amenities.
 
Cost3.100 NC a month
Comforts & Necessities3
Security2
Neighborhood3
Entertainment0
Entertainment AssetsArmory
OptionsObscure / Difficult to find, Safehouse
 

Robyn's

Books—the actual, for-real, hold-in-your-hand things— fill this shop. The soft thud of cloth covers closing, the crinkle of paper, the odor of aged pages interleaved with dust make this shop a delight for the senses. And you can even buy books if you want. It’s a great business to use as a cover, since you meet a range of knowledgeable (though often eccentric) people. Just don’t’ get so caught up in it that you forget you’re a Crosser.
 
Cost9.600 NC a month
Comforts & Necessities3
Security5
Neighborhood4
Entertainment2
Entertainment AssetsMerchandise: Goods (hard-copy books)
 

Stuffer Store

You can’t live at these ubiquitous convenience stores, but some people give it their best shot. Full of sugary snacks, soy-based burgers, and of course loads of soykaf, Stuffer Stores have food, public restrooms, and a staff that keeps them relatively clean, there often doesn’t seem to be a compelling reason to leave. Just remember to buy something before the employee behind the counter gets edgy. Or you can take over management of the whole shop, and the glamorous life of a convenience store operator can be yours for as long as you can make the payments.
 
Cost8.000 NC a month
Comforts & Necessities3
Security3
Neighborhood4
Entertainment3
Entertainment AssetsMerchandise: Goods (Food, 1 point), Soy Processing Unit, Walk-in Freezer
 

Typical Middle Class Suburban Home

White picket fence. Two-car-garage. All the electronic conveniences of modern life. This was many people’s definition of the American Dream in the twentieth century, and though the United States has fragmented, the dream remains for many people. And it is attainable, as long as you sell yourself, body and soul, to a megacorp. If you are a Crosser, of course, you just have to assume that guise for as long as you can afford it. Or until you need a change.
 
Cost5.000 NC a month
Comforts & Necessities3
Security3
Neighborhood4
Entertainment4
Entertainment AssetsGrid Subscription, Patron of the Arts (Art Museum), Public Transportation, Zen Den

corporatocracy.jpg
 

Table of Contents

  1. Lifestyles
  2. Game Information
  3. Paying the Bills
  4. Team Lifestyles
  5. Lifestyle Categories
  6. Fashion by Lifestyle
  7. Sample Lifestyle Locations

Lifestyle Costs

Lifestyle Cost
Street Free
Squatter 500 NC
Low 2.000 NC
Middle 5.000 NC
High 10.000 NC
Luxus 100.000 NC
 
Each point spent on Comforts & Necessities, Security, or Neighborhood increases the Lifestyle cost by ten percent of the base lifestyle. Points spent in the Entertainment category vary in cost; depending on the associated lifestyle, they may not bring in additional costs.
 

Fashion by Lifestyle

The cost of Lifestyle appropriate clothing. One set per month is included in the Lifestyle cost.
 
Lifestyle Clothing Cost
Street and Squatter 5 - 25 NC
Low 50 - 200 NC
Medium 200 - 500 NC
High 500 - 1.500 NC
Luxury 2.000 - 5.000 NC

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