Armiger Mattus Sera

Adapted from Amanda Hamon. (2019). Hellknight Hill. Hellknight Hill, p. 5. Paizo Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-1-64078-173-3

Armiger Mattus Sera

Physical Description

Special abilities

  • Attack of Oppourtunity
    Attack of Opportunity Class Feature 1
    REACTION

    Requirements Fighter or at least a 6th level Barbarian
    Description Trigger A creature within your reach uses a manipulate action or a move action, makes a ranged attack, or leaves a square during a move action it’s using.   You lash out at a foe that leaves an opening. Make a melee Strike against the triggering creature. If your attack is a critical hit and the trigger was a manipulate action, you disrupt that action. This Strike doesn’t count toward your multiple attack penalty, and your multiple attack penalty doesn’t apply to this Strike.
  • Intimidating Strike
    Intimidating Strike Class Feat 2
    DOUBLE ACTION

    Requirements Fighter
    Description Your blow not only wounds creatures but also shatters their confidence. 
    Applications Make a melee Strike. If you hit and deal damage, the target is frightened 1, or frightened 2 on a critical hit.
  • Pickpocket
    Pickpocket General Feat 1
    TRAIT

    Requirements Trained in Thievery
    Description
    Applications You can Steal or Palm an Object that’s closely guarded, such as in a pocket, without taking the –5 penalty. You can’t steal objects that would be extremely noticeable or time-consuming to remove (like worn shoes or armor or actively wielded objects). If you’re a master in Thievery, you can attempt to Steal from a creature in combat or otherwise on guard. When doing so, Stealing requires 2 manipulate actions instead of 1, and you take a –5 penalty.
  • Power Attack
    Power Attack Class Feat 1
    DOUBLE ACTION

    Requirements Fighter
    Description You unleash a particularly powerful attack that clobbers your foe but leaves you a bit unsteady.
    Applications Make a melee Strike. This counts as two attacks when calculating your multiple attack penalty. If this Strike hits, you deal an extra die of weapon damage. If you’re at least 10th level, increase this to two extra dice, and if you’re at least 18th level, increase it to three extra dice.
  • Shield Block
    Shield Block
    REACTION

    Description Trigger While you have your shield raised, you would take damage from a physical attack.   You snap your shield in place to ward off a blow. Your shield prevents you from taking an amount of damage up to the shield’s Hardness. You and the shield each take any remaining damage, possibly breaking or destroying the shield.

Athletics

  • Climb
    Climb
    SINGLE ACTION

    Requirements You have both hands free.
    Description You move up, down, or across an incline. 
    Applications Unless it’s particularly easy, you must attempt an Athletics check. The GM determines the DC based on the nature of the incline and environmental circumstances. You’re flat-footed unless you have a climb Speed.   Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success You move up, across, or safely down the incline for 5 feet plus 5 feet per 20 feet of your land Speed (a total of 10 feet for most PCs).
    • Success You move up, across, or safely down the incline for 5 feet per 20 feet of your land Speed (a total of 5 feet for most PCs, minimum 5 feet if your Speed is below 20 feet).
    • Critical Failure YYou fall. If you began the climb on stable ground, you fall and land prone.
  • Disarm
    Disarm
    SINGLE ACTION

    Requirements You have at least one hand free. Your target can’t be more than one size larger than you.
    Description You try to knock something out of an opponent’s grasp.
    Applications Attempt an Athletics check against the opponent’s Reflex DC.   Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success You knock the item out of the opponent’s grasp. It falls to the ground in the opponent’s space.
    • Success You weaken your opponent’s grasp on the item. Until the start of that creature’s turn, attempts to Disarm the opponent of that item gain a +2 circumstance bonus, and the target takes a –2 circumstance penalty to attacks with the item or other checks requiring a firm grasp on the item.
    • Critical Failure You lose your balance and become flat-footed until the start of your next turn.
  • Force Open
    Force Open
    SINGLE ACTION

    Description Using your body, a lever, or some other tool, you attempt to forcefully open a door, window, container or heavy gate. With a high enough result, you can even smash through walls.    
    Applications Without a crowbar, prying something open takes a –2 item penalty to the Athletics check to Force Open.
    • Untrained fabric, flimsy glass
    • Trained ice, sturdy glass
    • Expert flimsy wooden door, wooden portcullis
    • Master sturdy wooden door, iron portcullis, metal bar
    • Legendary stone or iron door
      Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success You open the door, window, container, or gate and can avoid damaging it in the process.
    • Success You break the door, window, container, or gate open, and the door, window, container, or gate gains the broken condition. If it’s especially sturdy, the GM might have it take damage but not be broken.
    • Critical Failure Your attempt jams the door, window, container, or gate shut, imposing a –2 circumstance penalty on future attempts to Force it Open.
  • Grapple
    Grapple
    SINGLE ACTION

    Requirements You have at least one free hand. Your target cannot be more than one size larger than you.
    Description You attempt to grab an opponent with your free hand.
    Applications Attempt an Athletics check against their Fortitude DC. You can also Grapple to keep your hold on a creature you already grabbed. Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success Your opponent is restrained until the end of your next turn unless you move or your opponent Escapes.
    • Success Your opponent is grabbed until the end of your next turn unless you move or your opponent Escapes.
    • Failure You fail to grab your opponent. If you already had the opponent grabbed or restrained using a Grapple, those conditions on that creature end.
    • Critical Failure If you already had the opponent grabbed or restrained, it breaks free. Your target can either grab you, as if it succeeded at using the Grapple action against you, or force you to fall and land prone.
  • High Jump
    High Jump
    DOUBLE ACTION

    Requirements You have at least one free hand. Your target cannot be more than one size larger than you.
    Description You Stride, then make a vertical Leap and attempt a DC 30 Athletics check to increase the height of your jump. 
    Applications If you didn’t Stride at least 10 feet, you automatically fail your check. This DC might be increased or decreased due to the situation, as determined by the GM.   Leap The Leap basic action is used for High Jump and Long Jump. Leap lets you take a careful, short jump. You can Leap up to 10 feet horizontally if your Speed is at least 15 feet, or up to 15 feet horizontally if your Speed is at least 30 feet. You land in the space where your Leap ends (meaning you can typically clear a 5-foot gap if your Speed is between 15 feet and 30 feet, or a 10-foot gap if your Speed is 30 feet or more). If you make a vertical Leap, you can move up to 3 feet vertically and 5 feet horizontally onto an elevated surface. Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success Increase the maximum vertical distance to 8 feet, or increase the maximum vertical distance to 5 feet and maximum horizontal distance to 10 feet.
    • Success Increase the maximum vertical distance to 5 feet.
    • Failure You Leap normally.
    • Critical Failure You don’t Leap at all, and instead you fall prone in your space.
  • Long Jump
    Long Jump
    DOUBLE ACTION

    Requirements You have at least one free hand. Your target cannot be more than one size larger than you.
    Description You Stride, then make a horizontal Leap and attempt an Athletics check to increase the length of your jump. 
    Applications The DC of the Athletics check is equal to the total distance in feet you’re attempting to move during your Leap (so you’d need to succeed at a DC 20 check to Leap 20 feet). You can’t Leap farther than your Speed. If you didn’t Stride at least 10 feet, or if you attempt to jump in a different direction than your Stride, you automatically fail your check. This DC might be increased or decreased due to the situation, as determined by the GM.   Leap The Leap basic action is used for High Jump and Long Jump. Leap lets you take a careful, short jump. You can Leap up to 10 feet horizontally if your Speed is at least 15 feet, or up to 15 feet horizontally if your Speed is at least 30 feet. You land in the space where your Leap ends (meaning you can typically clear a 5-foot gap if your Speed is between 15 feet and 30 feet, or a 10-foot gap if your Speed is 30 feet or more). If you make a vertical Leap, you can move up to 3 feet vertically and 5 feet horizontally onto an elevated surface. Degrees of Performance
    • Success Increase the maximum horizontal distance you Leap to the desired distance.
    • Failure You Leap normally.
    • Critical Failure You Leap normally, but then fall and land prone.
  • Shove
    Shove
    SINGLE ACTION

    Requirements You have at least one free hand. Your target cannot be more than one size larger than you.
    Description You push an opponent away from you. 
    Applications Attempt an Athletics check against your opponent’s Fortitude DC.

    Forced Movement

    The Shove action can force a creature to move. When an effect forces you to move, or if you start falling, the distance you move is defined by the effect that moved you, not by your Speed. Because you’re not acting to move, this doesn’t trigger reactions triggered by movement. Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success You push your opponent up to 10 feet away from you. You can Stride after it, but you must move the same distance and in the same direction.
    • Success You push your opponent back 5 feet. You can Stride after it, but you must move the same distance and in the same direction.
    • Failure You Leap normally.
    • Critical Failure You lose your balance, fall, and land prone.
  • Swim
    Swim
    SINGLE ACTION

    Description You propel yourself through water.
    Applications In most calm water, you succeed at the action without needing to attempt a check. If you must breathe air and you’re submerged in water, you must hold your breath each round. If you fail to hold your breath, you begin to drown. If the water you are swimming in is turbulent or otherwise dangerous, you might have to attempt an Athletics check to Swim. If you end your turn in water and haven’t succeeded at a Swim action that turn, you sink 10 feet or get moved by the current, as determined by the GM. However, if your last action on your turn was to enter the water, you don’t sink or move with the current that turn.  
    • Untrained- lake or other still water
    • Trained- flowing water, like a river
    • Expert- swiftly flowing river
    • Master- stormy sea
    • Legendary- maelstrom, waterfall
    Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success You move through the water 10 feet, plus 5 feet per 20 feet of your land Speed (a total of 15 feet for most PCs).
    • Success You move through the water 5 feet, plus 5 feet per 20 feet of your land Speed (a total of 10 feet for most PCs).
    • Critical Failure You make no progress, and if you’re holding your breath, you lose 1 round of air.
  • Trip
    Trip
    SINGLE ACTION

    Requirements You have at least one hand free. Your target can’t be more than one size larger than you.
    Description You try to knock an opponent to the ground.
    Applications Attempt an Athletics check against the target’s Reflex DC.  

    Falling

    When you fall more than 5 feet, you take falling damage when you land, which is bludgeoning damage equal to half the distance you fell. If you take any damage from a fall, you’re knocked prone when you land. If you fall into water, snow, or another soft substance, calculate the damage from the fall as though your fall were 20 feet shorter. The reduction can’t be greater than the depth of the water (so when falling into water that is only 10 feet deep, you treat the fall as 10 feet shorter). You can Grab an Edge as a reaction to reduce or eliminate the damage from some falls. Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success The target falls and lands prone and takes bludgeoning damage .
    • Success The target falls and lands prone.
    • Critical Failure You lose your balance and fall and land prone.

Thievery

  • Disable a Device
    Disable a Device
    DOUBLE ACTION

    Requirements Some devices require you to use thieves’ tools when disabling them.
    Description This action allows you to disarm a trap or another complex device. 
    Applications Often, a device requires numerous successes before becoming disabled, depending on its construction and complexity. Thieves’ tools are helpful and sometimes even required to Disable a Device, as determined by the GM, and sometimes a device requires a higher proficiency rank in Thievery to disable it. Your Thievery check result determines how much progress you make. Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success You disable the device, or you achieve two successes toward disabling a complex device. You leave no trace of your tampering, and you can rearm the device later if that type of device can be rearmed.
    • Success You disable the device, or you achieve one success toward disabling a complex device.
    • Critical Failure You trigger the device.
  • Palm an Object
    Palm an Object
    SINGLE ACTION


    Applications Palming a small, unattended object without being noticed requires you to roll a single Thievery check against the Perception DCs of all creatures who are currently observing you. You take the object whether or not you successfully conceal that you did so. You can typically only Palm Objects of negligible Bulk, though the GM might determine otherwise depending on the situation.   Degrees of Performance
    • Success The creature does not notice you Palming the Object..
    • Failure The creature notices you Palming the Object, and the GM determines the creature’s response.
  • Pick a Lock
    Pick a Lock
    DOUBLE ACTION

    Requirements Requirements You have thieves’ tools.
    Description Opening a lock without a key is very similar to Disabling a Device, but the DC of the check is determined by the complexity and construction of the lock you are attempting to pick. 
    Applications Locks of higher qualities might require multiple successes to unlock, since otherwise even an unskilled burglar could easily crack the lock by attempting the check until they rolled a natural 20. If you lack the proper tools, the GM might let you used improvised picks, which are treated as shoddy tools, depending 0n the specifics of the lock. Critical Success  Success  Critical Failure  Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success You unlock the lock, or you achieve two successes toward opening a complex lock. You leave no trace of your tampering.
    • Success You open the lock, or you achieve one success toward opening a complex lock.
    • Critical Failure You break your tools. Fixing them requires using Crafting to Repair them or else swapping in replacement picks (costing 3 sp, or 3 gp for infiltrator thieves’ tools).
  • Steal
    Steal
    SINGLE ACTION

    Description You try to take a small object from another creature without being noticed. Typically, you can Steal only an object of negligible Bulk, and you automatically fail if the creature who has the object is in combat or on guard.
    Applications Attempt a Thievery check to determine if you successfully Steal the object. The DC to Steal is usually the Perception DC of the creature wearing the object. This assumes the object is worn but not closely guarded (like a loosely carried pouch filled with coins, or an object within such a pouch). If the object is in a pocket or similarly protected, you take a –5 penalty to your Thievery check. The GM might increase the DC of your check if the nature of the object makes it harder to steal (such as a very small item in a large pack, or a sheet of parchment mixed in with other documents). You might also need to compare your Thievery check result against the Perception DCs of observers other than the person wearing the object. The GM may increase the Perception DCs of these observers if they’re distracted. Degrees of Performance
    • Success You steal the item without the bearer noticing, or an observer doesn’t see you take or attempt to take the item.
    • Failure The item’s bearer notices your attempt before you can take the object, or an observer sees you take or attempt to take the item. The GM determines the response of any creature that notices your theft.

Mental characteristics

Employment

Fighter

Fighter
Fighter
class

Pathfinder 2e, Class, Fighter


Hit Points

10

Key Ability

Strength or Dexterity

Advancement

Level Benefits
1st Ancestry and background initial proficiencies attack of opportunity fighter feat
2nd Fighter feat skill feat
3rd Bravery general feat skill increase
4th Fighter feat skill feat
5th Ability boosts ancestry feat fighter weapon mastery skill increase
6th Fighter feat skill feat
7th Battlefield surveyor general feat skill increase weapon specialization
8th Fighter feat skill feat
9th Ancestry feat combat flexibility juggernaut skill increase
10th Ability boosts fighter feat skill feat
11th Armor expertise fighter expertise general feat skill increase
12th Fighter feat skill feat
13th Ancestry feat skill increase weapon legend
14th Fighter feat skill feat
15th Ability boosts evasion general feat greater weapon specialization
16th Fighter feat skill feat
17th Ancestry feat armor mastery skill increase
18th Fighter feat skill feat
19th General feat skill increase versatile legend
20th Ability boosts fighter feat skill feat

 

Armiger

Armiger Dedication
Hellknight Armiger Dedication Dedication Feat 2
TRAIT

Requirements member of a Hellknight order, trained in heavy armor as well as your order’s favored weapon; Access You are from Old Cheliax.
Description Your Hellknight training teaches you to terrorize others into compliance, but you also study the structure and hierarchy of Hell. You must survive painful tests of your body and mind called reckonings, which steady your mind against all sorts of trauma. You gain resistance to mental damage equal to 1 + your number of class feats from the Hellknight Armiger archetype and other Hellknight archetypes. You become trained in Intimidation and Hell Lore; if you were already trained, you become an expert instead.
Applications Special You can’t select another dedication feat except for dedication feats for higher positions within the Hellknights until you have gained two other feats from the Hellknight armiger archetype.

Intellectual Characteristics

Hell and Engineering Lore

  • Earn Income
    Earn Income
    DOWNTIME

    Description You can use a skill—typically Crafting, Lore, or Performance—to earn money during downtime. You must be trained in the skill to do so. This takes time to set up, and your income depends on your proficiency rank and how lucrative a task you can find. Because this process requires a significant amount of time and involves tracking things outside the progress of adventures, it won’t come up in every campaign.   In some cases, the GM might let you use a different skill to Earn Income through specialized work. Usually, this is scholarly work, such as using Religion in a monastery to study old texts—but giving sermons at a church would still fall under Performance instead of Religion. You also might be able to use physical skills to make money, such as using Acrobatics to perform feats in a circus or Thievery to pickpockets. If you’re using skill other than Crafting, Lore, or Performance, the DC tends to be significantly higher.   You use one of your skills to make money during downtime. The GM assigns a task level representing the most lucrative job available. You can search for lower-level tasks, with the GM determining whether you find any. Sometimes you can attempt to find better work than the initial offerings, though this takes time and requires using the Diplomacy skill to Gather Information, doing some research, or socializing.   When you take on a job, the GM secretly sets the DC of your skill check. After your first day of work, you roll to determine your earnings. You gain an amount of income based on your result, the task’s level, and your proficiency rank. You can continue working at the task on subsequent days without needing to roll again. For each day you spend after the first, you earn the same amount as the first day, up until the task’s completion. The GM determines how long you can work at the task. Most tasks last a week or two, though some can take months or even years.
    Applications Crafting Goods for the Market (Crafting)- Using Crafting, you can work at producing common items for the market. It’s usually easy to find work making basic items whose level is 1 or 2 below your settlement’s level. Higher-level tasks represent special commissions, which might require you to Craft a specific item using the Craft downtime activity and sell it to a buyer at full price. These opportunities don’t occur as often and might have special requirements—or serious consequences if you disappoint a prominent client.   Practicing a Trade (Lore)- You apply the practical benefits of one of your Lore specialties during downtime by practicing your trade. This is most effective for Lore specialties such as business, law, or sailing, where there’s high demand for workers. The GM might increase the DC or determine only low-level tasks are available if you’re attempting to use an obscure Lore skill to Earn Income. You might also need specialized tools to accept a job, like mining tools to work in a mine or a merchant’s scale to buy and sell valuables in a market.   Staging a Performance (Performance)- You perform for an audience to make money. The available audiences determine the level of your task since more discerning audiences are harder to impress but provide a bigger payout. The GM determines the task level based on the audiences available. Performing for a typical audience of commoners on the street is a level 0 task, but a performance for a group of artisans with more refined tastes might be a 2nd- or 3rd-level task, and ones for merchants, nobility, and royalty are increasingly higher level. Your degree of success determines whether you moved your audience and whether you were rewarded with applause or rotten fruit. Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success You do outstanding work. Gain the amount of currency listed for the task level + 1 and your proficiency rank.
    • Success You do competent work. Gain the amount of currency listed for the task level and your proficiency rank.
    • Failure You do shoddy work and get paid the bare minimum for your time. Gain the amount of currency listed in the failure column for the task level. The GM will likely reduce how long you can continue at the task.
    • Critical Failure You earn nothing for your work and are fired immediately. You can’t continue at the task. Your reputation suffers, potentially making it difficult for you to find rewarding jobs in that community in the future.
  • Recall Knowledge
    Recall Knowledge
    SINGLE ACTION

    Description To remember useful information on a topic, you can attempt to Recall Knowledge. You might know basic information about something without needing to attempt a check, but Recall Knowledge requires you to stop and think for a moment so you can recollect more specific facts and apply them. You might even need to spend time investigating first. For instance, to use Medicine to learn the cause of death, you might need to conduct a forensic examination before attempting to Recall Knowledge.
    Applications The following skills can be used to Recall Knowledge, getting information about the listed topics. In some cases, you can get the GM’s permission to use a different but related skill, usually against a higher DC than normal. Some topics might appear on multiple lists, but the skills could give different information. For example, Arcana might tell you about the magical defenses of a golem, whereas Crafting could tell you about its sturdy resistance to physical attacks.
    • Arcana: Arcane theories, magical traditions, creatures of arcane significance, and arcane planes.
    • Crafting: Alchemical reactions and creatures, item value, engineering, unusual materials, and constructs.
    • Lore: The subject of the Lore skill’s subcategory.
    • Medicine: Diseases, poisons, wounds, and forensics.
    • Nature: The environment, flora, geography, weather, creatures of natural origin, and natural planes.
    • Occultism: Ancient mysteries, obscure philosophy, creatures of occult significance, and esoteric planes.
    • Religion: Divine agents, divine planes, theology, obscure myths, and creatures of religious significance.
    • Society: Local history, key personalities, legal institutions, societal structure, and humanoid culture.
    The GM might allow checks to Recall Knowledge using other skills. For example, you might assess the skill of an acrobat using Acrobatics. If you’re using a physical skill (like in this example), the GM will most likely have you use a mental ability score—typically Intelligence— instead of the skill’s normal physical ability score. Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success You recall the knowledge accurately and gain additional information or context.
    • Success You recall the knowledge accurately or gain a useful clue about your current situation.
    • Critical Failure You recall incorrect information or gain an erroneous or misleading clue.

Intimidate

  • Coerce
    Coerce
    EXPLORATION

    Description With threats either veiled or overt, you attempt to bully a creature into doing what you want.
    Applications You must spend at least 1 minute of conversation with a creature you can see and that can either see or sense you. At the end of the conversation, attempt an Intimidation check against the target’s Will DC, modified by any circumstances the GM determines. Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success The target gives you the information you seek or agrees to follow your directives so long as they aren’t likely to harm the target in any way. The target continues to comply for an amount of time determined by the GM but not exceeding 1 day, at which point the target becomes unfriendly (if they weren’t already unfriendly or hostile). However, the target is too scared of you to retaliate—at least in the short term.
    • Success As critical success, but once the target becomes unfriendly, they might decide to act against you—for example, by reporting you to the authorities or assisting your enemies.
    • Failure The target doesn’t do what you say, and if they were not already unfriendly or hostile, they become unfriendly. Critical Failure The target refuses to comply becomes hostile if they weren’t already, and can’t be Coerced by you for at least 1 week.

    Changing Attitudes

    Your influence on NPCs is measured with a set of attitudes that reflect how they view your character.
    • Helpful Willing to help you and responds favorably to your requests.
    • Friendly Has a good attitude toward you, but won’t necessarily stick their neck out to help you.
    • Indifferent Doesn’t care about you either way. (Most NPCs start out indifferent.)
    • Unfriendly Dislikes you and doesn’t want to help you.
    • Hostile- Actively works against you—and might attack you just because of their dislike.
    No one can ever change the attitude of a player character with these skills. You can roleplay interactions with player characters, and even use Diplomacy results if the player wants a mechanical sense of how convincing or charming a character is, but players make the ultimate decisions about how their characters respond.
  • Demoralize
    Demoralize
    SINGLE ACTION

    Description With a sudden shout, a well-timed taunt, or a cutting put-down, you can shake an enemy’s resolve.
    Applications Choose a creature within 30 feet of you who you’re aware of. Attempt an Intimidation check against that target’s Will DC. If the target does not understand the language you are speaking, you’re not speaking a language, or they can’t hear you, you take a –4 circumstance penalty to the check. Regardless of your result, the target is temporarily immune to your attempts to Demoralize it for 10 minutes. Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success The target becomes frightened 2.
    • Success The target becomes frightened 1.

Religion

  • Decipher Writing
    Decipher Writing
    EXPLORATION

    Description You attempt to decipher complicated writing or literature on an obscure topic.
    Applications This usually takes 1 minute per page of text, but might take longer (typically an hour per page for decrypting ciphers or the like). The text must be in a language you can read, though the GM might allow you to attempt to decipher text written in an unfamiliar language using Society instead.   The DC is determined by the GM based on the state or complexity of the document. The GM might have you roll one check for a short text or a check for each section of a larger text. Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success You understand the true meaning of the text.
    • Success You understand the true meaning of the text. If it was a coded document, you know the general meaning but might not have a word-for-word translation.
    • Failure You can’t understand the text and take a –2 circumstance penalty to further checks to decipher it.
    • Critical Failure You believe you understand the text on that page, but you have in fact misconstrued its message.
  • Identify Magic
    Identify Magic
    EXPLORATION

    Description Once you discover that an item, location, or ongoing effect is magical, you can spend 10 minutes to try to identify the particulars of its magic.
    Applications If your attempt is interrupted, you must start over. The GM sets the DC for your check. Cursed or esoteric subjects usually have higher DCs or might even be impossible to identify using this activity alone. Heightening a spell doesn’t increase the DC to identify it. Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success You learn all the attributes of the magic, including its name (for an effect), what it does, any means of activating it (for an item or location), and whether it is cursed.
    • Success For an item or location, you get a sense of what it does and learn any means of activating it. For an ongoing effect (such as a spell with a duration), you learn the effect’s name and what it does. You can’t try again in hopes of getting a critical success.
    • FailureYou fail to identify the magic and can’t try again for 1 day.
    • Critical Failure You misidentify the magic as something else of the GM’s choice.
  • Learn a Spell
    Learn a Spell
    EXPLORATION

    Requirements You have a spellcasting class feature, and the spell you want to learn is on your magical tradition’s spell list.
    Description If you’re a spellcaster, you can use the skill corresponding to your magical tradition to learn a new spell of that tradition.
    Applications You can gain access to a new spell of your tradition from someone who knows that spell or from magical writing like a spellbook or scroll. If you can cast spells of multiple traditions, you can Learn a Spell of any of those traditions, but you must use the corresponding skill to do so. For example, if you were a cleric with the bard multiclass archetype, you couldn’t use Religion to add an occult spell to your bardic spell repertoire.   To learn the spell, you must do the following:
    • Spend 1 hour per level of the spell, during which you must remain in conversation with a person who knows the spell or have the magical writing in your possession.
    • Have materials with the Price indicated.
    • Attempt a skill check for the skill corresponding to your tradition (DC determined by the GM). Uncommon or rare spells have higher DCs. If you have a spellbook, Learning a Spell lets you add the spell to your spellbook; if you prepare spells from a list, it’s added to your list; if you have a spell repertoire, you can select it when you add or swap spells.
    Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success You expend half the materials and learn the spell.
    • Success You expend the materials and learn the spell.
    • FailureYou fail to learn the spell but can try again after you gain a level. The materials aren’t expended.
    • Critical Failure As failure, plus you expend half the materials.
  • Recall Knowledge

Society

  • Create Forgery
    Create Forgery
    DOWNTIME

    Requirements You must have the proper writing material to create a forgery.
    Description You create a forged document, usually over the course of a day or a week.
    Applications When you Create a Forgery, the GM rolls a secret DC 20 Society check. If you succeed, the forgery is of good enough quality that passive observers can’t notice the fake. Only those who carefully examine the document and attempt a Perception or Society check against your Society DC can do so.   If the document’s handwriting doesn’t need to be specific to a person, you need only to have seen a similar document before, and you gain up to a +4 circumstance bonus to your check, as well as to your DC (the GM determines the bonus).   To forge a specific person’s handwriting, you need a sample of that person’s handwriting.   If your check result was below 20, the forgery has some obvious signs of being fake, so the GM compares your result to each passive observer’s Perception DC or Society DC, whichever is higher. Once the GM rolls your check for a document, that same result is used against all passive observers’ DCs no matter how many creatures passively observe that document. An observer who was fooled on a passive glance can still choose to closely scrutinize the documents on the lookout for a forgery, using different techniques and analysis methods beyond the surface elements you successfully forged with your original check. In that case, the observer can attempt a Perception or Society check against your Society DC (if they succeed, they know your document is a forgery). Degrees of Performance
    • Success The observer does not detect the forgery..
    • FailureThe observer knows your document is a forgery.
  • Decipher Writing
  • Recall Knowledge
  • Subsist
    Subsist
    DOWNTIME

    Description You try to provide food and shelter for yourself, and possibly others as well.
    Applications The GM determines the DC based on the nature of the place where you’re trying to Subsist. You might need a minimum proficiency rank to Subsist in particularly strange environments.   Unlike most downtime activities, you can Subsist after 8 hours or less of exploration, but if you do, you take a –5 penalty. Critical Success Success Failure Critical Failure Degrees of Performance
    • Critical Success You either provide a subsistence living for yourself and one additional creature, or you improve your own food and shelter, granting yourself a comfortable living.
    • Success You find enough food and shelter with basic protection from the elements to provide you a subsistence living.
    • FailureYou’re exposed to the elements and don’t get enough food, becoming fatigued until you attain sufficient food and shelter.
    • Critical Failure You attract trouble, eat something you shouldn’t, or otherwise worsen your situation. You take a –2 circumstance penalty to checks to Subsist for 1 week. You don’t find any food at all; if you don’t have any stored up, you’re in danger of starving or dying of thirst if you continue failing.

an Order of the Nail Hellknight on leave from Citadel Vraid in Varisia.

Current Location
Hellknight Hill
Alignment
White Black
Current Location
Ethnicity
Currently Held Titles
Year of Birth
2 SC 50 Years old
Children
Gender
Male
Aligned Organization

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