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Homebrew Rules

Homebrew Rules

 
  • Height Advantage - Elevation over you enemy is very important in combat. It should be something you actively scan for on the battlefield. Height Advantage now gives three distinct advantages to attacks, damage and defense.  
    • Attacks
    - Firstly, when making attack rolls while you have height advantage over someone, you gain a +2 untyped bonus to your attack roll.  
    • Damage
    - Additionally, when making melee attacks while having height advantage over someone, gain an untyped +2 bonus to damage rolls against that specific enemy you have height advantage over.  
    • Defense
    - Lastly, when an enemy whom you have height advantage over attacks you with melee attacks, you gain a +2 untyped bonus to your defenses against their attack against you.
 
  • Heavy Armor Fix - I say “fix” because the old system is kinda busted. People will actually opt for the last two tiers of light armor as opposed to getting the first two tiers of heavy armor, despite being proficient in it, because chain and scale armor, more or less, is not worth it in the eyes of many people. Since light armor allows you to add either your dexterity or intelligence modifier to your AC, that pretty much makes them more or less about equal to the first two tiers of heavy armor. That, plus the combined advantage of not having to deal with the negative penalties that heavy armor has, makes it a no brainier to most to just stick with the light armor. To fix this, people who are proficient in it, and wear heavy armor, also get to add their strength or constitution mod to their AC. I'm fairly certain that this is fair game since light armor does it, and this more accurately reflects reality.
 
  • Feints Fix - The old feinting system was kinda lame, in that it cost a standard action, lasts till end of your next turn, and can only be done once per encounter. But realistically, feinting takes up fractions of a second to perform, and can be done as much as you want in battle. So now, during a combat encounter, you can try to gain combat advantage against an adjacent enemy by feinting. As a minor action, make a Bluff check opposed by the enemy’s Insight check. If you succeed, you perform a Feint with your weapon, which gives you combat advantage over that enemy that lasts until the end of your turn. This can be repeated as many times as you wish in the same encounter, but you can’t keep getting away with it. That enemy starts to wise up against your antics, and thus each feint after the first will be harder and harder to pull off, meaning you take a -2 to each subsequent feint check after the first check. This -2 penalty is effective regardless of if the previous feint succeeded or failed.
 
  • Extra Feats - To accommodate for firearms and their special homebrew feats, and because I really want you guys to focus on your character builds, I'll be decreeing extra feats. Those who research their role well will be awarded by this decree, and those who ignore their role will be burdened by this decree. We shall now have 1 feat per level. Because of this new decree, I will allow anyone to retrain all of their feats this one time at the start of level 8.
 
  • Currency - We will be using pence (d), shillings (s) and gold (g) as currency. To obtain the value of an item in 4E in pence, shillings, or gold, simply divide non-magical items by 100, and magical items by 1000. That will be your item’s price in gold. Numbers in the ones, tens or hundreds place and greater are obviously equal to whole gold coins, while numbers in the decimal places must be rounded to a number between 1/240, and 240/240, since 1 gold = 240 pence, 1 gold = 20, shillings, 1 shilling =12 pence.
 
  • Arms and Armor Materials - There are three major types of materials for the usage of arms and armor in the world of Phoenix, natural precious metals, ceramic, and chitin. Each material has its own pros and cons, allowing for more variety and optimization. More details in the “homebrew armor” section of this article.
 
  • Critical - When determining initiative, and skill checks, rolling crits does not immediately and automatically succeed or fail like attack rolls do in combat. Instead, if you roll a nat 20, then add +5 to your check. If you roll a critical fail, subtract -5 to your check.
 
  • Role Playing Checks - Skill checks will have a difficulty class placed on top of them that is situational depending on the exact words you use, or actions you take in your particular situation. This way, we’re forced to think about our actions a bit more, and actually RP a bit when making decisions. This way, even with a high bluff skill, you can’t just make the most outrageous claims and essentially brainwash people into believing in what you say. Or, you can’t just lift a pinky finger and claim “I’m intimidating” without incurring severe DC penalties to your check. Another good example was portrayed in the last session of Bogus Booty, when Renko made an intimidation check by asking a question. He failed the intimidation check, but since he asked a question to intelligent beings, they responded, and thus acted accordingly, and resulted in things going in Renko's favor anyway.
 
  • Ammunition Limitations - You’ll still be able to carry as much as 4E allows you to carry, but your ammo pouch, (be it a quiver, an actual pouch, a bandolier or whatever) will only be able to hold a limited amount. See the “homebrew firearms” section of this document for more details.
 
  • Forced Movement -Normally in DnD 4E, when you get pushed off a ledge, you get to make a saving throw to see if you get to grab onto the ledge. Now, when you get pushed off from a ledge, you take a penalty to your saving throw equal to the amount of squares remaining forced movement you have left.
 

Homebrew Feats

  Oathkeeper's Weapon Training - PreReq - Attaining the rank of Assistant Executioner, or Executioner within the Oathkeeper's faith - Gain a weapon prof, and a +1/2/3 feat bonus to damage for attacks made with the weapon group of the weapon you chose to gain prof from this feat. Also gain training in religion, and you can now speak in supernal* (You may speak supernal, and all may understand what you say, but you still can only understand languages that you know.)   Puppy Guard - You aim your ranged weapon at a target, but don't attack right away. This simple mind game throws even the most skilled and experienced of combatants. You gain the ability to feint with ranged weapons against non adjacent targets. The target must be able to see you, and it still costs a minor action to perform this feint, and all rules as acording to my Feint Fix rule, applies here.   There were a few of you who had special feats, but I cannot remember them. Daro, Marzluf,  

Homebrew Weapons

  I’m willing to create weapons for you guys that aren’t already in 4E if your willing to discuss it with me.  

Homebrew Weapon Properties

 
  • Versatile Splenge - The difference between Versatile and Versatile Splenge is that Versatile Splenge is Versatile, and it gives a +1 untyped bonus to attack rolls when the weapon is being used two handed.
 
  • High Crit Splenge - The difference between High Crit, and High Crit Splenge, is that a weapon with High Crit Splenge only has the high crit property when it is used two handed.
 

Homebrew Melee Weapons

 
  • Estoc - The lovechild of a longsword and a rapier. The blade's cross-sections can be triangular, square, rhomboid or flat hexagonal. This geometry leaves hardly any cutting capability as a sharpened edge could simply not be ground, but allowed the weapon to become lengthy, stiff, and very acutely pointed, making it excellent for thrusting and piercing. Although this is a one-handed weapon, to make the most of it, you must two-hand it. One-handed superior, prof +3, 2d4, 35gp/0.35g. 4lbs, light blade, versatile splenge, high crit splenge.
 
  • Kriegmesser - Otherwise known as a war knife. This is the love child of a bastard sword, and a scimitar. Very popular in the late 14th, and 15th centuries. Although this is a one-handed weapon, to make the most of it, best use it two-handed. One-handed superior, prof +3, 2d4, 40gp/0.4g, 6lbs, heavy blade, versatile splenge, high crit splenge.
 
  • Executioner's Sword - A more refined and civilized tool for the Executioner, and the evolution of the executioner's axe. The executioner's sword is the love child of an executioner's axe and a fullblade. The executioner's sword is heavily weighted on the far end, giving it brutal cleaving power, just like an executioner's axe. It has a longer cutting edge than an axe, meaning it's more likely to hit, just like a fullblade. However, the it is clearly less powerful than an axe or a fullblade because of it’s awkwardly weighted construction, especially when used in combat. But it does offer the best of both weapons. The nature of the sword allows one's head to be chopped while kneeling, even standing, which is a more dignified way to go, as opposed to groveling, and prostrating on the floor. Two-handed, superior, prof +3, d10, 50gp/0.5g, 7lbs, heavy blade, high crit, brutal 2.
 
  • Lucerne - The Lucerne is a hammer with the reach of a polearm. It's a very popular weapon used against heavily armored opponents, especially when you want to keep them away from yourself. Military, Two-handed, prof +2, d10, 50gp/0.5g, 7lbs, hammer, polearm, reach.
  •  
  • Peasant's Flail - It's a flail with the reach of a polearm. Surprisingly, this is a relatively new type of flail. It features a long two-handed shaft, with a hinge or chain that attaches to the business end of a flail. The business end, like all flails, can be smooth, studded, or spiked. Because of the better leverage available to this weapon, it has the potential to hit harder than it's one handed cousin. Military, Two-handed, prof +2, d12, 25gp/.25g, 7.5 lbs, flail, polearm, reach.
 
  • Basket-hilted Sword - These basket-hilted swords are the most recent developments in warfare technology. Although, long have we known of the existence of these basket-hilted swords, only recently could blacksmiths reproduce them in a way that was both defensible for combat, and light enough as to not throw off the balance of the blade. Superior, One-handed, prof +3, d8, .45g, 2.5lbs, heavy blade, defensive.

Homebrew Firearms

  The 16th century was the transition century of warfare in real life history. About 50 years later we had the iconic Three Musketeers looking solider, and 50 years in the past we were in the pinnacle of plate armor technology. As firearms became more common place, they made armor and skilled professional mounted knights, and mounted men-at-arms obsolete. The classical knight as we knew it was in decline, because they cost more to deploy, and require a lifetime of training. The classical knight and man-at-arms could effectively be killed by peasants and serfs armed, trained, and equipped with significantly less.   Pistol ammo costs 4s for 20 shots, blunderbuss costs 4s for 8 shots, arquebus costs 5s for 20 shots.   Another thing I want firearms in my homebrew DnD 4E to represent is the advantage of ease of use firearms have over more conventional weapons have. To use a sword even semi competently, you must spend hundreds of hours practicing. Same with a bow, even the act of wearing certain armors require training and proficiency. However, firearms require almost little to no training to use with lethal results. Even a child could be trained to point and pull a trigger. A lowly baron could hire a line commander, then arm a dozen or two men with nothing but gunpowder and shot, and he could could be a legitimate threat to countrysides, and highways, maybe even small villages. That is, if they could find and afford a line commander, and a few dozen firearms. So, to represent the advantage of ease of use firearms have over conventional weapons, firearms can use either dex or strength mod to determine RBA's.   If you want to make a build out of firearms, you'd likely need to talk to me about it, and we can work it out. Firearms in my homebrew are more supposed to be like weapons of opportunity than a weapon you build around. Altho, as some party members have already shown, firearm builds can work, and work well they do.   Due to compatibility issues, any enchantment that has the "bow", "crossbow", "hand crossbow", requirement can also be appiled to firearms. Also, due to obvious game breaking bullshit, the enchantment "Swiftshot Weapon" cannot be applied to firearms.  

Homebrew Firearm Properties

  • Load 2 Minor - Weapons with this property require two minor actions to reload.
  • Load Standard - Weapons with this property require a standard action to reload.
  • Load Full - Weapons with this property require all 3 actions to reload.
 

Homebrew Firearm Feats

  Blunderbuss Expertise - Gain +1/2/3 feat bonus to attacks made with a Blunderbuss. The range of your shots made with the blunderbuss change. Slug shots now deal 3d8 to targets within 6 squares and less, and 3d6 damage to targets between 7 and 12 squares. Buck shots still do 3d4, but it changes from close blast 3 to close blast 5. Also, you don't provoke OPAs from enemies if they are a target to your attacks made with a blunderbuss.   Blunderbuss Mastery - PreReq Epic - All attacks you make with a blunderbuss has the brutal 2 property.   Marksmen - Gain +1/2/3 feat bonus to attacks made with an Arquebus. An Arquebus can be reloaded with a load 2 minor instead of a load standard.   Arquebus Mastery - PreReq Epic - All attacks you make with a arquebus now has a brutal 3 property.   Flintlock Pistol Expertise - +1/2/3 feat bonus to attacks made with flintlock pistols, and be able to reload flintlock pistols as a minor action. Additionally, You can use a minor action to flip flintlock pistols your have wielded and use them as a melee weapon equivalent to a mace. They do not provoke OPAs while flipped and used as maces, but they also cannot be reloaded when they are used as maces. While being used as a mace, the feat bonus to attacks from this feat also applies to these pistols being used as maces.   Flintlock Mastery - PreReq Epic - All attacks you make with flintlock pistols have the brutal property.   Center Mass - Before rolling for you attack with a firearm, declare "center mass". Upon doing so, you forfeit the the ability to score a critical hit on a nat roll of 20. In return, Flintlock Pistols do an additional d6, Blunderbuss Buck deals an extra d4, Blunderbuss Slug deal an extra d8, and an Arquebus deals an extra d12. (This extra die also carries the brutal property if that weapon has it.)   Line Commander - Prerequisite; must be a leader class. Your experience as a leader, and with firearms have given you great insight to the inner workings of powder and shot warfare. You use either your wisdom mod to coordinate attacks, or your charisma mod to inspire your allies to boost moral and improve their aim with firearms. Allies proficient with a firearm may use your wisdom mod, or charisma mod as an untyped bonus to their attacks made with a firearm. Also, as a Line Commander, you also gain the Lacky Loader at-will power.   Lacky Loader- This at-will power allows you to exchange or give your firearm to an adjacent ally as a minor action. The ally who receives your weapon may reload the firearm as a free action, and return/exchange it back to the Line Commander at the end of their turn as an immediate reaction so long as they are still adjacent to you.   Marksman's Defense - On your turn, if you discharged a firearm, and no firearm you have wielded is loaded, then you gain a +2 bonus to AC until the start of your next turn.   Arquebusier's Defense - When wielding an arquebus with both hands, gain a +1 shield bonus to AC and reflex. When a bayonet is fixed upon your arquebus, the shield bonus to AC and reflex equals +2. Also, while a bayonet is fixed on your arquebus, the bonus to defenses from OPA's you gain increases from +2 to +4 when using it as a ranged weapon.  

Firearms

 
  • Flintlock Pistols - Flintlock pistols were a definitive wildcard. Sometimes it penetrated armor, sometimes it didn’t, it depended on tons of different situational factors. So, to combat this wildcard effect, people carried multiple flintlock pistols. Pirates were known to carry like seven or eight pistols on then, and used them accordingly one right after the other. One-handed, superior, 2d6, ranged 5/10, prof 2, .5g , 2lbs, firearm, offhand, load 2 minor.
 
  • Blunderbuss - Blunderbuss shoots two different types of ammo, either a buck, or a slug. Buck spreads, and hurts multiple enemies, while slug shot is focused at a single enemy, and hurts more.  
    • Blunderbuss (slug) - Two-handed, superior, 3d8 at ranges 1-3, 3d6 at ranges 4-6, prof 0, .75g 6lbs, firearm, brutal, load standard.
     
    • Blunderbuss (buck) - Two-handed, superior, 3d4, close blast 3, target; creatures in blast, prof 0, 75g 6lbs,firearm, load standard.
  • Arquebus - An arquebus may be fixed with a bayonet as a minor action assuming you have one. While the bayonet is fixed you gain a +2 bonus to OPA's you provoke using the arquebus as a ranged weapon, but the the ranged attack of an arquebus suffers a -2 to attack rolls. Additionally, with the bayonet fixed on, this weapon gains a melee attack. With a bayonet fixed onto it, the Arquebus has the same properties as a pike. Two-handed, superior, 2d12, range 20/40, prof 3, .8g, 10lbs, firearm, load standard, brutal 2.
 

Mortars

The explosive rounds these mortars use are big, bulky awkward to carry, heavy, and dangerous to transport, and not to mention expensive and rare. Not many had the knowledge to mis gunpowder, nor the balls to experiment with it. At least for now. A total of of 2 hand mortar ammo may be carried per person, and a total of 1 stick mortar ammo may be carried per person. You’d need to spend actions to get more from your backpack if you want more mortar ammo for that encounter. Hand Mortar ammo costs 6s per round, stick mortar ammo costs 10s per round, and the alternate fire, the flamethrower ammo, costs 8s per round. Note that much like the blunderbuss buck and slug were the same weapon, that just used different ammo, the stick mortar is also the flamethrower that just uses different ammo.  
  • Hand Mortar - The hand mortar is the newer and more refined younger brother of the stick mortar. Hand mortars are still rare because they are still in it’s experimental phase at this point in time. Hand mortars were mostly made for shooting fireworks, but military grade hand mortars did exist and would fire a small explosive. One-handed, superior, 6d4, area burst 1 within 10 squares, target: all creatures in burst, prof 2, 3.5g, mortar, load full, offhand, brutal, high crit.
 
  • Stick Mortar - The hand mortar’s bigger tougher older brother. It’s pretty much just a bigger hand mortar fixed on a long shaft, requiring two hands to operate properly. Because of the greater stability the shaft offers, the bore of this mortar was often bigger, and could fire an even larger explosive than the hand mortar could. Plus, the stick mortar could be used to fire a special round that essentially engulfed your enemies in flames.
    • Two-handed, superior, 6d8, area burst 3 within 20 squares, target: all creatures in burst, prof 2, 2.5g, mortar, load full, Brutal 2, high crit.
 
  • Stick Mortar Flamethrower - The flamethrower round of the stick mortar is used more for when enemy ranks are a mere few feet before you. The flamethrower has a primary and secondary attack. The secondary procs if the primary hits. The primary attack deals 6d6 fire damage, and the secondary attack deals 10 ongoing fire damage, with a -2 penalties to saves. (save ends both). Two-handed, superior, 6d6, close blast 5, target; all creatures in burst, prof 2, 2.5g, mortar, load full, brutal.
 

Homebrew Armors

  For the sake of variety, optimization, and making my homebrew unique, in this world of Phoenix, there are three primary types of materials in which arms and armors are made of. Natural earth metals, chitin, and ceramic. Each has their own unique pros and cons.  

Natural Earth Metals

  Otherwise known as natural. This is traditionally what people used in time immemorial. Natural arms and armor have no penalties unlike chitin and ceramic, but it’s bonus is rather mild because of that. Enchantments made on natural weapons, shields, and armor are enhanced by 1 level. You basically treat your natural weapon/shield/armor as if it has the next level enchantment already. For example, say a natural weapon enchantment is currently at level 4, with a +1, and it’s next upgrade is at level 8 with a +2. You basically get to treat your lv4 +1, as if it were a lv8 +2, and when you do reach lv8 and upgrade it to a +2, you get to treat it as if it were the next level (probably a lv 12 with a +3), and so on, so forth.  

Chitin

  Chitin in general is made out of lightweight, yet sturdy materials. Chitin shields and armor provide no speed or skill check penalties, provide an extra untyped bonus defense other than AC, two resistances, 1 vulnerability, and is expensive to craft/buy.   Chitin Weapons - Because of their lightweight and sturdy construction, chitin weapons tend to be a lot more accurate, giving a +3/4/5 bonuses in attack rolls per hero’s tier. This is in addition to attack rolls and damage bonuses weapons get when enchanted.   Chitin Shields - Chitin shields, since they are lightweight yet sturdy, suffer no speed and skill check penalties. They also provide an extra untyped defense depending on what type of chitin is used. Chitin light shields provide a +1 to the additional defense the specific type of material offers, while heavy chitin provides a +2 to the additional defense that specific type of material offers.   Chitin Armor - Chitin has the same defenses as natural armor, but usually provides an additional defense other than AC, two resistances, but one vulnerability. The additional defense, resistance, and vulnerability it gives depends on the type of chitin being used.  

Hornetaur Chitin - Hornetaur is exceptionally lightweight, which gives defensive bonuses to reflex. Like the Hornetaurs who have made their homes in the fungal jungles in the Westerlands, their chitin resists acid and poison, but is very vulnerable to fire.

Cloth +0 AC, +4 Reflex, r3 acid, poison, v3 fire

Leather +2 AC, +3 Reflex ,r4 acid poison, v4 fire

Hide +3 AC, +2 Reflex, r5 acid, poison, v5 fire

 

Chain +6 AC, +4 Reflex, r6 acid, poison, v6 fire

Scale +7 AC, +3Reflex, , r7 acid, poison, v7 fire

Plate +8 AC, +2 Reflex, r8 acid, poison, v8 fire

Hercudrome Chitin - Hercudrome Chitin is exceptionally sturdy, providing defensive bonuses towards fortitude. Like the Hercudrome, it’s chitin resists fire and radiant damages, but is vulnerable to lightning. Hercudrome is found in the jungles of province of Mindanao, in the lands of Maharlika.  

Cloth +0 AC, +4 Fortitude, r3 fire, radiant, v3 lightning

Leather +2 AC, +3 Fortitude, r4 fire, radiant, v4 lightning

Hide +3 AC, +2 Fortitude, r5 fire, radiant, v5 lightning

Chain +6 AC, + 4 Fortitude, r6 fire, radiant, v6 lightning

Scale +7 AC, +3 Fortitude r7 fire, radiant, v7 Lightning

Plate +8 AC, = +2 Fortitude, r8 fire, radiant, v8 lightning

Ohmu Chitin - The Ohmu is an odd insect. It can communicate, and even influence others to do it’s bidding, and it is believed that their chitin is a huge reason why. Their chitin emits strong telepathic energy, which provides bonus will defenses, and resists psychic and necrotic damage, but is very sensitive to the cold. Cold damage, and cold weather negates the psychic resistance of the armor until the end of your next turn.  

Cloth +0 AC, +4 Will, r3 psychic, fire, v3 cold, cold damage/exposure negates this armor's resistances until the end of your next turn.

Leather +2 AC, +3 Will, r4 psychic, fire, v4 cold, cold damage/exposure negates this armor's resistances until the end of your next turn.

Hide +3 AC, +2 Will, r5 psychic, fire, v5 cold cold damage/exposure negates this armor's resistances until the end of your next turn.

Chain +6 AC, +4 Will, r6 psychic, fire, v6 cold, cold damage/exposure negates this armor's resistances until the end of your next turn.

Scale +7 AC, +3 Will, r7 psychic, fire v7 cold, cold damage/exposure negates this armor's resistances until the end of your next turn.

Plate +8 AC +2 Will, r8 psychic, fire v8 cold, cold damage/exposure negates this armor's resistances until the end of your next turn.

 

Ceramic

Ceramic - Ceramic is widely available thanks to the Ceramic Revolution, and can be cheaply purchased, at around half the price natural armors come. Nobles like to arm their less experienced underlings with ceramic armor, and the more experienced and richer knights and men-at-arms use ceramic as their first set of armor, then just switch to a 2nd set when it breaks. Ceramic armor provides exceptional defense, but they come with a critical drawback. Ceramic arms and armor can break, potentially shattering in the middle of combat. Ceramic arms and armor can be repaired at any blacksmith cheaply, even once completely shattered, provided you picked the pieces up. Repairs are priced at 1/16th the total cost of your weapon, shield, or armor. The word “total” meaning that you have to add 1/16th the price of whatever kind of enchantment you have on the armor, + the 1/16th the price of the armor itself. For example, if you had broken ceramic plate armor, with a lvl 4 enchantment, then the cost is equal to (1/16th of plate armor ) + (1/16th of a level 4 enchantment). Or, in this case, (.5g + .84g)/16, which is .08375g, or 20 pennies to repair. One other thing to note for ceramic arms and armor. Critical hits from attacks that also deal fire do not break down the ceramic.   Ceramic Weapons - Ceramic weapons provide fantastic amounts of additional damage, +4/6/8 untyped damage per hero’s tier. However, unlike ceramic shields and armor, ceramic weapons act a little differently when it comes to breaking down.   On the 1st, and 2nd natural 1 roll, Ceramic weapons don’t suffer any penalties. Ceramic weapons up to this point can be repaired to full on a short or extended rest, but if you roll a 3rd natural 1 roll before having the chance to repair it back to full, then the weapon wil have broken beyond your expertise to repair on your own. They will require a smith, proper tools, and a station to repair after the 3rd natural 1 roll you make with ceramic weapons. On the 3rd natural 1 roll, ceramic weapons only have a chance of breaking. On the 3rd natural 1 roll, you can accept the result, automatically "missing" the attack like normal, which guarantees your weapon stays intact, or you can reroll. If your reroll is a natural 5 or lower, your weapon shatters after your attack. However, on the 4th nat 1 roll, the weapon shatters on the square you are occupying. Once shattered, the ceramic weapon breaks and cannot be used as intended until you repair it. Unfortunately, there are no such things as ceramic bows, and crossbows (and anything else I can think of that makes no sense.)   Ceramic Armor - Unique to ceramic armor, all ceramic armor have a special homebrew property known as Critical Durability (which is pretty much 4E's Durable armor property, but it only loses the property when you receive critical attacks, as opposed to any old regular attack). Ceramic armors give added protection by absorbing some of the force from certain incoming attacks, however, critical attacks damage the armor. You essentially resist untyped damage equal to the armor’s CD rating.   Treat ceramic armor and shields as having three "strikes" before they shatter and become unuseable. The first strike / critical hit they receive, the armor looses it's CD rating. At this point, the armor or shield can still be repaired to full during a short or extended rest. The second strike / critical hit that ceramic shield or armor takes without first being repaired to full, that armor or shield is broken to a point beyond your expertise can repair on your own. It will require a smith, with a proper tools, and a stations to repair, or straight up magic. On strike 3, the ceramic armor straight up shatters on the spot you are standing. Once shattered, ceramic armor and shields provide nothing until they are repaired at a smith, or through magic. Ceramic armor provides greater damage absorption when it is enchanted. Add enhancement bonus of the armor to the fire resistance, and CD rating of the light ceramic armor, and twice the enhancement bonus to the fire resistance, and CD rating of heavy ceramic armor.   Ceramic armor and shields still have the same AC, speed, and skill check penalties as natural armor.  
  • Ceramic Fiber Cloth (cloth) A high purity alumino-silicate based ceramic fiber, reinforced with fiberglass filament and optional alloy steel wires. Ceramic Fiber Cloth is very durable, yet able to bend and conform to the dynamic shapes of all races. +0 AC r3 fire, cd2.
  • Padded Ceramic Fiber Cloth (leather) Same principle as CFC, but uses thicker woven threads. +2 AC, r5 fire, cd3.
  • Ceramic Scale (hide) Scale and Lamellar are similar in ideology, but lamellar pieces are connected in every direction, whereas scale pieces are only connected with the piece above them. This makes scale less defensible, but cheaper, whereas lamellar is more expensive to assemble, and more defensible. +3 AC, r6 fire, cd4
  • Ceramic Lamellar (chain) +6 AC, r4 fire, cd2.
  • Ceramic Brigandine (scale) Ceramic Brigandine armor takes the principles of padded ceramic, and scale/lamellar armor. Ceramic Brigandine armor has rivets on the outside, going through thick PCF, and has dozens and dozens of small ceramic plates on the inside. Properly tailored Ceramic Brigandine is very agile to move in, and provides excellent defenses. In addition, brigandine, although repetitive to craft, is very easy to make, making it a favorite compromise from ceramic plate armor. +7 AC, r5 fire, cd3.
  • Ceramic Plates - Nothing beats the defense of 100% tailored plate armor. The fact that it is ceramic means that all sorts of weird shapes can be forged, leading to very customizable and unique armor sets. However, making large odd pieces of ceramic battle ready is a a difficult task for any blacksmith. Only the best of the best smiths will be commissioned to craft such armor. +8 AC, r6 fire, cd4.
  Ceramic Shields - Ceramic shields provide similar defenses as ceramic armor does. Ceramic light shields provide an untyped fire bonus resistance of 1, CD rating of 1. Ceramic heavy shields provide an untyped fire resistance bonus of 2, CD rating of 2.   Ceramic shields break down the same way ceramic armor does.  

Homebrew Magic Items

  Ironwood Greatbow - This greatbow is made of the tough and sturdy Ironwoods of the North. It has a very sturdy frame, enabling the user to perform a longer draw than usual which increases their accuracy.  

Lv 2 +1, +2 to attack rolls from long draw power, d6 critical

Lv 6 +2, +3 to attack rolls from long draw power, 2d6 critical

Lv 10 +3 +4 to attack rolls from long draw power, 3d6 critical

Lv 12 +4, +5 to attack rolls from long draw power,4d6 critical

Lv 16 +5 +6 to attack rolls from long draw power, 5d6 critical

Lv 22 +6 +7 to attack rolls from long draw power, 6d6 critical

 

Weapon: Greatbow

Enhancement: Attack and Damage Rolls.

Power: Once per encounter you may perform a long draw right at the start of your attack, enabling you to gain an attack roll bonus depending on the level of this bow. +d6 per plus on critical hits.

  Eye of the Tiger - There was once a legend of a large white tiger with the heart of a lion. This tiger of legend was a ferocious beast unlike other tigers, who were ambush predators. This tiger struck first, and struck hard. The tiger fended off against many of his own during mating season and became very skilled against fighting ambush predators. In doing so, this tiger fathered many children. It is believed that this tiger of legend is the ancestor of the breed of large white tigers that roam the jungles just north of the Marshlands. It is rumored that the white tiger would give the dire wolf a run for their money. If you look hard enough, you can still see the glint of the predator’s eye within this fossil. When you see it, and keep the eye worn on your person, you too gain the abilities of this tiger of legend, getting an item bonus to initiative. Ferdinand gifted this to Santiago along with the Absolute Vanguard’s Ring. Little did he know that this necklace would lead Santiago to his death. A secondary effect this necklace had was to prevent the wearer from being surprised, and because of this, Santiago was able to intercept an assassination attempt against Ferdinand XIV.  

Item Slot: neck

Enchantment; NADs

Property; Item bonus to initiative depending on the level of this item's enchantment

Power (Daily) Immediate interrupt. Prevents the wearer from being surprised, by allowing one to take certain actions during an enemy's surprise round.

 

Lv 2; +2 initiative item bonus, as a daily power, you may take a move action during an enemy's surprise round.

Lv 6; +3 initiative item bonus, as a daily power, you may take a move action during an enemy's surprise round.

Lv 10; +4 initiative item bonus, as a daily power, you may take a move action during an enemy's surprise round.

Lv 12; +5 initiative item bonus, as a daily power, you may take a minor action during an enemy's surprise round.

Lv16; +6 initiative item bonus, as a daily power, you may take a minor action during an enemy's surprise round.

Lv 20; +7 initiative item bonus, as a daily power, you may take a minor action during an enemy's surprise round.

Lv22; +8 initiative item bonus, as a daily power, you may take a standard action during an enemy's surprise round.

  Thiever’s Bane - In the 5th century NCE, the mint of Omnis Crepusculum, the economic capital of the world, created a great number of these 3 coin sets. They then sent a select few out to kings, nobles and prominent bankers and merchants, then eventually began circulating these coins as a gift to the whole world, with the intent to deter theft.   Because of a subtle, yet powerful enchantment, these coins will always appear no different than any other gold coin of it's time. In reality, these coins have a special magical enchantment that's hard to detect. In any given three coin set, the majority holder of the coins will always intuitively know where the single lone coin is.  

Dayman’s Medallion - An enchanted 22 karat gold medallion that has a sun with eight thin, wavy, and tapering rays surrounding it. The sun has a comical looking judgemental face molded into the center of the sun. It’s rather charming… in it’s own way. The wearer of this medallion feels the effects within a minute, getting a +2 to charisma during the daytime, but a -1 charisma and -1 dexterity during the nighttime. The wearer of this medallion will feel this effects of this medallion for a full 24 hours, regardless of taking the medallion off afterwards. The medallion only enchants one person at a time. The charming nature of this magical medallion also grants the wearer a bonus to diplomacy.

 

Item Slot: Neck

Enchantment: NADs

Property: +2 charisma during the day, -1 charisma and dexterity during the night. Also gain an item bonus to diplomacy. The property changes depending on what level enchantment this item has.

 

Lv 2; +2 charisma during the day, -1 charisma and dexterity during the night. +2 item bonus to diplomacy.

 

Lv 6; +2 charisma during the day, -1 charisma and dexterity during the night. +3 item bonus to diplomacy.

 

Lv 10; +3 charisma during the day, -1 charisma and dexterity during the night. +3 item bonus to diplomacy.

 

Lv 12; +3 charisma during the day, -1 charisma and dexterity during the night.+4 item bonus to diplomacy.

 

Lv16; +3 charisma during the day. +4 item bonus to diplomacy.

 

Lv20; +4 charisma during the day. +4 item bonus to diplomacy.

 

Lv 22; +4 charisma during the day. +5 item bonus to diplomacy.

 

Nightman’s Locket - An enchanted sterling silver locket with the symbol some masked man with a tattered tricorn hat and a long coat standing with one arm fully extended, raised above their head, and the other arm, fully extended, reaching out laterally. The back of the locket says “make contact”. The wearer of this locket who stares into any moon and mimics the gesture within the locket will feel it’s magical effects within a minute, granting a +2 to dexterity during the nighttime, but a -1 charisma and -1 dexterity during the daytime. The wearer of this locket will feel this effects of this locket for a full 24 hours, even if they take the locket off. The locket only enchants one person at a time. The inside of this locket is molded to look like an eyeball, and on the other side etched into the silver says “eyes on the inside”, although, nobody recalls what this means. Ironically, this locket's magical properties gives the wearer an item bonus to insight.

 

Item Slot: Neck

Enchantment: NADs

Property: Bonus to dexterity during the night, penalty to charisma during the day, and gain item bonus to insight. This property changes depending on the level of this magical item's enchantment.

 

Lv 2; +2 dex during the night, and -1 cha during the day. +2 item bonus to insight

 

Lv 6; +2 dex during the night, and -1 cha during the day. +3 item bonus to insight

 

Lv 10; +3 dex during night, but -1 cha during the day. +3 item bonus to insight

 

Lv 12; +3 dex during the night, and -1 cha during the day.+4 item bonus to insight

 

Lv16; +3 dex during the night, +4 item bonus to insight.

 

Lv20; +4 dex during the night, +4 item bonus to insight.

 

Lv 22; +4 dex during the night, +5 item bonus to insight.

 

Champion’s Chains - A large enchanted chain made out of galvanized iron. The chain links have uniquely molded skulls on them. The skulls all vary, and are obviously the skulls from all races. The Champion’s Chains rattle, and can send the fear of death down anyone’s spine. This chain grants a bonus to any ability score, but only when they are in combat. Outside of combat, they subtract from the original score they choose, and dexterity. The Reaper’s chains enchants only one person at a time, and the effects will last a full day regardless of taking the chains off.

 

Item Slot: Neck

Enchantment: NADs

Property: Gain +2 to any ability score of your choosing, but only during combat. Once chosen, forever keep that ability score in mind when your PC deals with this item. Outside of combat, -1 of the ability score you chose, and -1 to dexterity. Also, gain a +3 item bonus to intimidate. The property changes depending on what level of enchantment is on these chains.

 

Lv 2; +2 to ability score during combat. -1 to your ability score, and dex outside of combat. +3 item bonus to intimidate.

 

Lv 6; +2 to ability score during combat. -1 to your ability score, and dex outside of combat. +4 item bonus to intimidate.

 

Lv10; +3 to ability score during combat. -1 to your ability score, and dex outside of combat. +4 item bonus to intimidate.

 

Lv12; +3 to ability score during combat. -1 to your ability score, and dex outside of combat. +5 item bonus to intimidate.

 

Lv16; +3 to ability score during combat. +5 item bonus to intimidate.

 

Lv 20; +4 to ability score during combat. +5 item bonus to intimidate.

 

Lv 22; +4 to ability score during combat. +6 item bonus to intimidate.

 

Night Stalker’s Mantle - An enchanted mantle made out of the rare large feathers from a large owl. The feathers of an owl is the result of eons of evolution that eventually spawned feathers designed for stealth. These giant stealth feathers actually helps mask the sound of the wearer. This enchanted mantle also increases your dex and charisma of the wearer by 1, but only during the night.

 

Item Slot: Neck

Enchantment: NADs

Property: Gain dexterity and charisma according to the level of this item, but only during the night. In addition, you gain an item bonus to stealth. This property changes depending on the level of this item's magical enchantment.

Lv 8; +4 item bonus to stealth, and +1 bonus to dex and wisdom, but only during the night

 

Lv 14; 4 item bonus to stealth, and +2 bonus to dexterity and charisma, but only during the night

 

Lv 16; +6 item bonus to stealth, and +2 bonus to dexterity and charisma, but only during the night

 

Lv 22; +6 item bonus to stealth, and +4 bonus to dexterity and charisma.

 

Lv 24; +8 item bonus to stealth and +4 bonus to dexterity and charisma.

 

Sir Stuffington Von Cotton Level 4+

Special Soldier/Minion

Small Natural Humanoid (living construct)

Initiative +6 (Will delay to match current owner)

Senses Perception +10, Darkvision

HP 1; a missed attack never damages a minion.

AC 24 Fortitude 17 Reflex 18 Will 18

Speed 5

Alarming Bash (Standard; at-will) *Weapon This special steel mace is hollowed out and has 6 ball bells inside the hollowed out portion that produces a jingling sound when swung.

Rejuvenation (encounter): At the cost of a potion of healing, Sir Stuffington can be revived. Otherwise, Sir Stuffington comes back to life during a short or extended rest.

Automated Sentry (already factored in)+2 con and +2 str,+1 will, +8/12/16 endurance, +7/11/15 to Perception

Unsleeping Watcher: Sir Stuffington does not sleep, and so long as he is attuned to you, he will keep watch over you when you sleep, and sound the alarm when perceived danger approaches.

 

Str 20 (+5) Con 18 (+4) Dex 14 (+2) Int 10 (+0) Wis 12 (+1) Cha 18 (+4)

Alignment - Languages none

Equipment Steel Plates (Plate armor+ 8 AC already factored in), Ironwood Heater Shield (Light shield+1 AC, already factored in), Alarm Mace (d8)

 

AC=22+ 1/2/3 + ½ level

NADs=17+ 1/2/3 + ½ level

Attack vs AC= 9+/11+/13 +½ level

Damage = d8+6/9/12

 

Levels up between 1-30 like player characters do, but he doesn't use XP to level up. He "levels up" by disenchanting him, and re-enchanting him with a stronger enchantment. Because of his special construction, Sir Stuffington may only be enchanted by the arcane blacksmiths of Puerto de la Madera Hierro. Refer to PHB pg 223 to determine how much it's going to cost to enchant Sir Stuffington.

 

Sir Stuffington is a living construct created by Ferdinand XIV. Originally designed to keep watch over his future children, and to fight and die for them if need be. This was an experimental piece, and he claims to have since mastered the art of animation, making this model obsolete. But not useless. Sir Stuffington is considered discarded, and enters a state of inactivity if he hasn’t been hugged for more than a week. Once discarded, he can be attuned to a new master by being hugged. Alternatively, the master of Sir Stuffington can discard him at will as a free action, or designate a new master at will as a free action.

 

Once attuned, Sir Stuffington will automatically follow his master around, and take his orders, on his own turn. He will defend his master at all costs.


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