Ma'ore

The Heart of the Family

Grammy Ma'ore, what can I do to help?
  While all members of a Rol'nara household are considered equal parts of the family, each family tends to rally around one or, for larger families, two individuals who are especially important to the emotional and physical well-being of the family. These are the Ma'ore, the Heart of the Family. In times of strife they sing the rally cry that carries the family through the changes, and in times of joy they cheer they loudest for other's accomplishments.  
We have tough times ahead, but Papa Ma'ore will guide us through. He always does.
  The title of Ma'ore is never claimed by the bearer, but rather earned over time through actions and the family's recognition of their importance to everyone within the household. Someone who campaigns for the role is unlikely to keep it, if they even gain it at all. The Ma'ore is not one to step in for the glory or the attention, but rather the individual who always steps in when nobody else will. They shoulder the humble tasks required to keep a family strong and functioning, simply because those are the things that need to be done.   In t ime, the family notices and begins to defer to that individual when decisions need to be made that will alter the family's way of life. Other members of the household will continue to assist and plan and perform their assigned and chosen chores to assist the family, but the Ma'ore's suggestions and requests begin to override everything because of the family's respect for them and trust in them. If Ma'ore says this is the path to take, the family adjusts to follow.

Qualifications

The Ma'ore must be a member of the household, by agreement of all other family members. There is no requirement that the Ma'ore is related to the family, merely that the rest of the household accepts them as one of their own.

Appointment

Selection of the Ma'ore is unanimous among all other members of the household, even if the individual selected objects to the assignment. There is no official voting process, it simply happens over time as the household recognizes those who prioritize and support the needs of the family.   The title itself is also fluid, and will transfer readily from one individual to another if someone else is better supporting the family. If the transfer of title is due to a temporary issue, such as an illness, the family may freely transfer the role back to the original holder upon their recovery if they once again resume their family-centric activities.   Most families only have one Ma'ore, although large households, blended families, or families dealing with extreme hardships may select two. In this case each Ma'ore would have a separate realm of influence in the household. A Ma'ore in these cases would defer to the other in issues outside of their own realm of responsibility.


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