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Kalamar

Kalamar, as it has come to be called, refers to the many popular squid dishes of the coastal lands. Different cultures and regions have their own particular cuisine. The mildly sweet taste and hint of salt and seafood, has led it to become a highly desired food of many seaside towns.

Common Dishes

Each unique coastal region offers slightly different versions of the dish with their own local flair and custom ingredients. Various sauces, spices, and cooking styles lend to a diverse assortment of flavors and plating options. While it is impossible to list all possible combinations, the three most commonly marketed types, one from the East, the South, and the West, follow below.  

Deep Fried Beer Battered Kalamar With White Sheepradish Sauce And Verdant Kelp

 
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by from pixabay

Ingredients

 
  • Gladius Squid, 2 fresh. Makes about 10 rings per squid.
  • Verdant Kelp, 1 cup fresh and finely chopped.
  • White Sheepradish Sauce, serves 12. Made from:
  • Sheepradish Root, 2 tbsp fresh, finely grated.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar, 1 tsp.
  • Sugar, 1 tsp.
  • Salt, 1/4 tsp.
  • Black Pepper, 1/8 tsp.
  • Sour Cream, 1/2 cup.
  • Mayonnaise, 2 tbsp.
  • Chives, 1 tbsp.
  • Beer Batter, Made from:
  • Local Beer (lager is best), 1 1/2 cup (drink the rest).
  • Sea Turtle Egg, 1 large, lightly beaten.
  • Flour, 1 cup.
  • Sea Salt, 1 tbsp.
  • Black Pepper, 1/2 tsp ground.
  • Garlic Powder, 1 tsp.
  • Paprika, 1 tbsp.
 

Preparation

 
  • Slice the squid into even bite sized rings (arms and tentacles can be cooked whole).
  • Soak in lemon juice and sea salt for 30 minutes.
  • Prepare sheepradish sauce by finely grating white sheepradish root and mixing with apple cider vinegar, sugar, salt, black pepper, sour cream, mayonnaise, and chives. Chill at least 24 hours until served.
  • Prepare beer batter by whisking in all of the dry ingredients, then stir in the egg, and finally whisk in the beer until the batter forms.
  • Coat the squid rings in batter and lightly drop into hot oil. Cook until a golden brown color and place on a rack to dry and serve hot.
  • Plate the hot rings, dribble on the cold sheepradish sauce, and add the chopped kelp on top.

Grilled Kalamar With Local Vegetables

 
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by from pixabay

Ingredients

 
  • Gladius Squid, 2 fresh. Makes about 10 rings per squid.
  • Ruby Tomatoes, halved.
  • Banana Peppers, whole.
  • Black Night Olives, pitted.
  • Sea Salt, a pinch.
  • Black Pepper, a pinch of ground.
  • Oregano, a pinch.
  • Parsley, 1 tsp.
  • Sunbeam Lemon Juice
  • or
  • White Raspberry Balsamic Vinaigrette Reduction, servers 4. Made from:
  • Balsamic Vinegar, 6 tbsp.
  • Sparkling Olive Oil, 6 tbsp.
  • Garlic, 2 minced cloves.
  • Wine Mustard, 2 tsp.
  • Raspberry Jam, 2 tbsp.
  • Salt & Pepper, to taste.
 

Preparation

 
  • Slice the squid into even bite sized rings (arms and tentacles can be cooked whole).
  • Soak in lemon juice and sea salt for 30 minutes.
  • Precook the squid by low boiling the squid for 30 to 45 minutes.
  • Prepare the raspberry reduction by placing all of it's ingredients in a bowl and mix until very well combined. Then add it to a small pot and simmer over low heat for about 15 minutes, until it is reduced by half.
  • Allow the squid to cool to room temperature and quickly grill it
  • Coat in olive oil and season with salt and pepper before adding it to a high-temperature grill.
  • Add in the tomatoes, peppers, and olives, and grill all together until the tentacles curl, flipping once.
  • Plate and add lemon juice topping or white raspberry vinaigrette reduction sauce.

Sautéed Kalamar In Sunbeam Lemon Pesto Sauce

 
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by from pixabay

Ingredients

 
  • Gladius Squid, 2 fresh. Makes about 10 rings per squid.
  • Red Pepper Flakes, 1/2 tsp crushed.
  • Parsley, 1 tsp chopped.
  • Snow Pepper, fresh cracked.
  • Sunbeam Lemon, 2 quarters.
  • Capers, 1/4 cup.
  • Artichoke Hearts, 1/4 cup.
  • Pesto Sauce. Made from:
  • Pine Nuts, 1/3 cup cooked.
  • Basil Leaves, 2 cups packed, fresh.
  • Hard Cheese, 1/4 cup grated
  • Sunbeam Lemon Juice, 2 tbsp.
  • Garlic, 2 cloves, roughly chopped.
  • Emerald Tomatoes, 1 cup.
  • Sea Salt, 1/2 tsp fine.
  • Sparkling Olive Oil, 1/2 cup.
 

Preparation

 
  • Slice the squid into even bite sized rings (arms and tentacles can be cooked whole).
  • Soak in lemon juice and sea salt for 30 minutes.
  • Precook the squid by low boiling the squid for 30 to 45 minutes.
  • Prepare the pesto sauce by toasting the nuts in a medium skillet for a few minutes to bring out more flavor. Grind the basil, cooled nuts, hard cheese, and salt in a mortar and pestle. Add the lemon juice, garlic, and emerald tomatoes. Drizzle in the olive oil and add more cheese, and grind until a thin paste with some texture.
  • Heat pan and add oil once hot.
  • Once smoking, add the garlic, capers, artichoke hearts, parsley, and red pepper flakes to the hot oil and for about 10 seconds.
  • Add the squid, salt, and snow pepper. Shake pan constantly for a few minutes to keep the squid moving and not burning.
  • Toss the squid and pesto in a bowl and then plate with lemon quarters.
"Never did I think that such an ugly and slimy sea creature could taste so good. I wish that we could get these in the heartland."
— Gula Grimsmoke, Head Chef at the Wooden Dog Inn
 
calamari-2186531_1280.jpg
by from pixabay
Item type
Consumable, Food / Drink
Rarity
This dish is commonly found among the coastal settlements, but is much harder to come by the farther inland one travels.
Base Price
1 silver piece.
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by from pixabay

Harvesting

  Living hundreds of feed deep in the ocean, the elusive Gladius Squid was an extremely difficult creature to catch. They would only approach the surface on nights lit by the full moon. As the moon rises, the curious squid are attracted to the light and swim to the top to look for prey, and in the warm summer months to mate. The fisherman in turn would flock to the seas during these short stretches of time to catch as many as they could before the rising of the sun. Only a few days per year were these creatures able to be caught and the chefs and cooks would pay handsomely for them.    However, with new inventions and magical items used to light the nighttime waters, more and more squid are able to be harvested. With a larger and more readily available supply, the prices lowered, allowing more dining establishments and more people to enjoy the delicious dishes. 
   
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by from pixabay

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Cover image: by from pixabay

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