CD10 Core: Characters

HARDHATS REQUIRED!
Work in progress ahead. Information in this article could change!

Life will give you whatever experience is most helpful for the evolution of your consciousness. How do you know this is the experience you need? Because this is the experience you are having at the moment.
— Eckhart Tolle
 

Why a character?

The character (or the role, the person, the PC etc) is the individual that represents you in the game world. In CD10 a character is called a character or PC (player character) for short. In order to play a role-playing game you must have a character so one of the first steps on your journey towards playing is to create your character.   If you're used to other role-playing games you may already have some idea on how to create a character. We'll assume, however, that you have no idea how to start or that you're used to more mechanics-heavy games such as Dungeons and Dragons or Pathfinder. Usually in such games, you'll be looking at numbers, tables and points to create your character.   In CD10 we take things from another perspective, but don't worry! We'll get to the numbers eventually. For CD10 the character's backstory is very important in establishing history, motivation and helping you pick skills and traits, and it is the point where we will start.  

What is a character?

A character in CD10 is built up of a backstory, species, a set of traits, a set of skills and optionally a set of abilities taken from a module. Abilities depends on the setting. A magical setting could see the character have magical abilities, while a modern or futuristic setting could see characters have mutations, cybernetics or psionic abilities. Each of these stats tell you something about how the character will perform in the game.  

Background

The character's background is among the most important parts of a character and even though it isn't displayed on the character sheet or provide any numbers for gameplay, the backstory is what helps the player guide which traits, skills and abilities to choose for the character. In addition, the background sets up a couple of important events and people for the GM to use in future stories. We'll go through how to create a background in just a minute.  

Species

Depending on the setting, the species of the character affects a few things including a set of starting traits and possibly abilities in addition to providing a social context for the story. Your choice of species doesn't have to be made early on in character creation. It can usually be left to until after you've created your backstory, but depending on settings, the choice of species may be more or less important. Ask your GM about the details of the setting.

Traits

Traits are descriptors of the character and can describe things like physical prowess, mental faculties, quirks, personality and even things like fate. Traits help define a character and thanks to their integration into the core of CD10, traits can play a large part mechanically, giving your choices real gameplay impact.  

Skills

The skills of a character define what they have learned in life and how good they are at performing them. Most anyone who has played roleplaying games are familiar with skills and how you perform "skill checks" to overcome challenges in the game.  

Abilities

Abilities is the umbrella term for things that a character can do or things they possess that aren't either skills, traits or equipment. For instance, if your character is capable of using magic, magic spells are refered to as abilities. Mutations, psionics and cybernetic equipment is also refered to as abilities and fall under the same category.

Background

The first step of character creation is to come up with a backstory. Where did your character come from? Who are they? Create a background story together with the GM. The background is important to allow the GM to tailor the story to your character and to establish some important people in your character's life.   It's usually a good idea to come up with a profession for your character during character creation, to help guide you in picking skills and traits.  

To keep in mind during character creation

  • Pick one person that has been influential in your life and that still mean a lot to you.
  • Pick one person that is your rival. Someone who has been a thorn in your side in your life.
  • Pick two members of the party and describe your relationship with them.

To come up with a backstory can sometimes be difficult and if you're not used to it and it might even feel like an almost unbeatable foe. Being used to free-form theater, writing or manuscripting helps but is not necessary. Our method will help you create a fleshed out and solid backstory for your character no matter your level of experience with backstories.

Backstories in TTRPGs have a bad reputation of either being too shallow (my parents were murdered by orcs) or far too verbose (30 pages of excruciating detail). The backstory should give us an insight into what has happened to the character and why he is the way he is. Who is he? Where'd he grow up? Who were his childhood friends? What shaped his motivations and morality? What's his favorite color?

Is writing a backstory hard?

It's as common with people having trouble with writing backstories as is the opposite. Some people can spit out fantastic backstories in a just an instant. Though people will find it at least somewhat difficult and considering how important your backstory is for playing in CD10, we'll give you a hand in creating one.

It doesn't have to be hard to make a backstory and if you have the right tools and guidance at hand it becomes almost second nature. With our method it doesn't have to be hard nor take a lot of time.

When it comes to the physical description of the character, these are often the complete opposite. Instead of being shallow they are outlandish, over the top and far too long, delving deeply into his "fiery gaze" and "intimidating posture". We're trying to create a believable character in CD10, so we'll try to be just a bit more mundane and subtle without being bland.  

Creating backstory

Start by getting yourself a notebook, an empty document or use a worksheet if you own the physical copy of the game. You will find the worksheets at the very back of the book, among the other sheets.  
Creating a character in CD10 is done in several major steps of which the first is the backstory, the next step is general information and finally traits, skills and other numbered stats. The method we use to create a backstory was popularised by Guy Sclanders of "How To Be A Great Game Master" fame. It involves six questions that help you focus on the task and organically grows the backstory.   If you're coming from other RPGs you might feel it awkward to begin with backstory instead of getting your class, species and attributes in place first and then coming up with a backstory. But trust us, this will make things much easier for later. If you're used to that method of character creation you might already know what gender, profession and species you want your character to be. That's good! Write that down, but don't let it stop you from continuing on.

The Great Questions

  • Where were they born?
  • Who are/were their parents?
  • What were they doing before the adventure?
  • Why did the character leave that life behind to go adventuring?
  • What did they leave behind?
  • What is the character's goal?

With these six questions we'll come up with your character's background. We'll go through each question in detail and explain how you can use them to flesh out your character and stir your imagination. If you are very comfortable with coming up with character backstory, you may safely skip this part. If not, we're here to help, so let's start from the very start!

Where was the character born?

Deciding on where your character is from is a great way to start off the creation. Find a map and work with the GM to find a place that sounds cool and decide that this is the spot. Depending on the setting you are playing in, your origins may have significant impact.   The GM may already have an idea already of where she wants the party to be from. That can help you, give you some constraints on what to pick from.
Adi is creating a character in Cinders of the Cataclysm, which is a postapocalyptic cyberpunk universe. With only one city surviving the end of the world, she has the option of either growing up in the surviving city, or be a wastelander. Adi decides that her character is a low ranking citizen in Fusion City, growing up in Skaska Waterfront.
 

Species and ethnicity

Species can have a significant impact and social context, depending on setting. It is not necessary for you to pick a species already at this point, even though you probably have an idea already. You have chosen the location where your character was born, which at least gives you an ethnicity and cultural origin.
Adi decides that her character, Kavor, is a Kuna.
 

Environment

So, now that we have a general area that our character is from, where exactly are they from? We can ask questions such as in what environment they were born and grew up in. A city? The plains? The mountains? The environment where they grew up is important. It impacts a lot about the character's childhood and the general security of the environment impacts whether or not they grew up in a dangerous or safe space.   These questions stir your mind, makes you think. What if the character grew up in the city? They would've undoubtedly been familiar with traders, markets, bazaars and craftsmen peddling their wares, if we were in a medieval/fantasy setting. They would have learned know how to keep their purse safe from guttersnipes. But would they know of animals? Farming? The struggle to put food on the table? The ordeal of a bad harvest and how that would affect the entire year? Possibly not.   If the character lived in the city, did they ever long for the freedom of the open green fields or the mysteries of the forests? If they lived on the farm did they ever dream about the wonders of the city, about walking through the great bazaar? All of these choices affect our character in significant ways. There's so many questions that can get born out of that first simple question. You don't need to keep asking questions forever, but let that initial question guide you through the very early life of your character.
Adi describes that Kavor grew up in the slums of Skaska Waterfront and became an orphan at an early age. Kavor was a mechanical genius and spent most of his time tinkering with people's motorcycles and cars. He learned his way around the street-gangs and criminals in the area.
 

Who were their parents?

After you've decided on where you character was born and where they grew up, it's time to look at the parents and by extension: family.   We've already touched a bit on the social status question and it's time now to finalize that decision. What was their social status and how wealthy were they? This should, but doesn't have to, be in line with what traits you have in mind for your character. If you want a wealthy character of status, the family should be of status as well. It could be that the character has gained fame and fortune on their own, obviously, but the simplest solution is to make the family wealthy.   Are the parents still alive? What do they do for a living? What is the character's relationship with their parents? Does our character have any siblings? What is their relation? What about other relatives?
Kavor was orphaned at a young age, with his parents being killed in a police raid. He has a sister who is still alive. His parents being killed by the police has left him suspicious of authority. While being orphaned is a cliché story, Adi feels it fits for her character and sticks to the story.
 

What was the character doing before the adventure?

Now we've moved out of childhood, adolescence and the early life. What we are looking for right now is what your character was doing just before they started out on the coming adventure. Were they working? Were they unemployed? Studying? This gives us a springboard off of which we will launch our character into the adventure and ground them in the world.   This is a good place to fill out some blanks, such as what did you character do for a living, what did they study and where do their primary skills lie? What have they been doing up until the start of the adventure? This will lay the groundwork for picking skills later.
Kavor has been honing his mechanical skills and understanding and runs a mechanical shop in the slums of Skaska Waterfront. He is well liked among the locals and treats everyone equally. It doesn't matter if you're a corporate snob or a common street-thug; everyone is welcome at Kavor's! So Kavor is, just before this adventure begins, working a mechanical shop in his home district.
 

Why did the character leave their life behind to go adventuring?

An important question to ask. What made your character leave their life behind to go out and become an "adventurer"? While "being an adventurer" certainly isn't a job description, something caused your character to venture out into the world and do something beyond just having a job. Perhaps they are a mercenary for hire, or an investigative journalist on the hunt for the next scoop or they're a gang member with great ambitions. Something must have driven them out from a cushy comfort of a desk job.
In the case of Kavor, he dreams of becoming a farmer with his own farm, which would require significant funding in Fusion City. He is not getting enough from the mechanical shop, so he also works as a private chauffeur for a high-status woman.
 

What did they leave behind?

This question touches on what the character had to or left behind when they went off on adventure. Did they leave any family or friends behind? Did they leave a job behind? What unresolved conflicts remain behind from their previous life?   The GM can use these unresolved conflicts and things that the character leaves behind to make interesting and engaging side-quests later on in the campaign.
Kavor has left his mechanical shop and all his contacts in Skaska Water front behind, but he has the option of returning, should he need to.
 

What is the their goal?

Final question for the day touches upon what the character is planning. What are their dreams? What are they trying to achieve with their life? This gives you a nice hook to start off your character.
We previously mentioned that Kavor dreams of settling down with a farm, growing his own crops. That is what he strives for, and to him it doesn't matter if that farm is in the city or the wastelands as long as he can work it himself.
 

Personality Archetype

This is an optional feature of the game. It's a guide for you as a new player to help ground your character's personality in something. We know what has happened to our character through the backstory and we know some of her thoughts and motivations, but we don't really have any great idea on how he thinks and acts. Giving him a personality archetype helps give you a springboard from which to portray your character.   The archetype is nothing you really write down anywhere as a stat or class. It's simply something that you keep to yourself as a guideline. Your character is also not aware of the fact that he is a particular archetype. He just is. Also remember that the archetype is not a prison for your character. Just because you happen to be an empathetic character doesn't mean they have to be a pacifist.  

The Dependable

This archetype is stable, faithful and responsible. They are the kind of person you can depend on through thick and thin. They'll be there to do what they were entrusted to do to the utmost of their ability, and they'll back their friends for as long as it's possible.   The Dependable is self-controlled and doesn't lose their footing and cool just because things get tough. The Dependable will be with you all the way to the bitter end, and will not abandon their friends or those that they care for.   The Dependable is also someone who is somewhat reserved and will not take a lot of room in the group, but will instead let the more vocal and dominant people do the talking. It does not, however, mean that they'll accept just anything. If push comes to shove and the group starts getting into things that the Dependable will not agree with, they will speak their mind, often emphatically.  

The Empathetic

The Empathetic is someone who has a lot of understanding and care for others. They are the one to ask if what you're doing is the right thing to do. They're something of a moral compass for the party.   The Empathetic doesn't necessarily have to be a pacifist or even against violence. Instead, they might be the one to say "A lot of people are going to get hurt in this battle. Perhaps we should make sure our soldiers are well equipped and armored to ensure they survive."   It's quite possible for someone to be quite violent and still be empathetic. They might well suggest a swift attack and the murder of several people, if the purpose is to save those that the empathetic cares about.  

The Leader

This is an archetype that many people want to play as and one that many unconsciously end up playing anyway. The Leader is a person who thinks in terms of "We need to do A, so in order to do that we need to first accomplish B, C and D. Once that's done we can get to E." They're very targeted and focused and are generally the ones in the group to take initiative towards the goal. Sometimes they're not the greatest at planning, however.   The Leader is usually one who tries to take command and get the group to decide on a direction. They're the ones who drive the group forward. The Leader may not necessarily be the one that thinks about the well-being of others. In the aforementioned example of the soldiers, the Leader may not necessarily think about equipment and armor, but instead focus on strategy and tactics instead.   Just because one picks the Leader archetype does not necessarily mean that one is the de-facto leader of the group, although it does help as you avoid two people who constantly get into arguments over where to go.  

The Creative

The Creative archetype can be difficult to play, as they can easily turn out to be silly and over the top. The Creative sees the beauty in the world and is creative, artistic, expressive and whimsical.   That does not mean that all they ever do is sit at home and make paintings. The Creative may see the beauty of the masses of soldiers in the battle before them, or perhaps they have a perverse interest in chopping enemies apart, one limb at a time. Or perhaps they're someone who carves intricate patterns into the skulls of their defeated enemies.   Just because they can see and appreciate the beauty in that exquisite arch does not mean they cannot also see the beauty of the blood spattered all over the wall. As the Creative, you need to be just that; Creative!

The Loner

One of the most difficult archetypes to make work well in a group, and also one of the most misunderstood. The Loner is, by definition, someone who is self-sufficient, introvert and avoids contact with others. Not exactly the best match for a game focused around playing in a party.   Generally this is the second most common archetype after The Leader, as people see a hero on TV or in a movie and decide that they want to be just like them. But everyone cannot be Aragorn or Altaïr ibn-la'ahad.   The Loner, therefore, must take it upon themselves to involve the rest of the group as much as possible, while doing their "loner" stuff. If the Loner is the only one who can sneak in and steal the secret member list of the Shadow Cult, the he can ask the Protector to keep guard so the Loner can work in peace.   While the Loner is an introvert and generally distrustful of others, it helps group dynamics if the Loner finds one or two in the group they trust and can deliver their information to, that they can talk to. Playing the Loner means being a Loner to everyone but the own party.  

The Problem Solver

This archetype is one who constantly asks questions. "Why did this happen?", "Why did they attack us?", "Why is the captain in such a cranky mood and how can we solve that?"   The Problem Solver is someone who is constantly on lookout for new problems and solutions for said problems. They have a deep seated need to solve everything. External problems as well as internal problems. Is there a conflict between characters? It must be solved.   A good example of a Problem Solver is Sherlock Holmes. He's not interested in other people. He wants to solve the case, and so he does. The Problem Solver will bring all the archetypes of the group together and ask them for help, input and their resources. They don't have much interest in leading or beauty. They just want to solve the problem and get closer to the solution.  

The Explorer

The Explorer is the one who is never really at peace until they've explored everything. They drive the party to always go a little further, a little longer. While the Leader may say "We've achieved our goal. Time to go." the Explorer will say "Buuuut, we never checked behind that third door in the second corridor, remember? Why don't we go have a peek?"  

The Protector

While the Dependable is the one who is stable and loyal, the Protector is the one who will physically step between the party and danger. The Protector is only interested in one thing and that's the safety of the ones under their protection. The Protector naturally is strong, stable and is usually someone with a conviction.   Normally they are the one who will put the party's well being in front of everything else. If the party is offered a lucrative, but dangerous offer, they are the ones to speak up and say "I don't think we should do this. This is beyond our abilities." The Protector will not only protect the party from external dangers, but from themselves.  

The Diplomat

The Diplomat archetype is easy going, sociable and easy to deal with. They try to be on everyone's good side as far as it's possible. When the Leader comes along with an unpopular decision, the Protector might disagree loudly, in which case the Diplomat will try to negotiate between them.   When the Explorer is pining to go right, while the Leader says left, the Diplomat will walk the golden middle road and say that "while right certainly sounds exciting, why don't we go left first and then explore right later?"
 

Choosing your archetype

Regardless of which archetype you pick, if any, remember that it's only a guide for your character's personality. Try to stick to the archetype as a guidance for you, but always strive to find new ways of expressing that archetype. If you've picked the Protector then listen carefully at group conversations and step in and intervene when they start getting overly dangerous.   You don't have to be annoying and intervene in every discussion all the time, or as the Creative you do not have to constantly comment on the prose of people talking or the exquisite greenness of the grass. Try to use the archetype as a guide, not a crutch or a stick to beat people over the head with.  

Additional personality traits

For this section we're mostly thinking of behavioural things, such as how does the character move and behave in general. Do they bite their nails when nervous? Do they have a nervous laugh? A twitch in the corner of their eye when they're lying? Think about more visible and physical or behavioural traits that make your character stand out more from the others.   Another thing to consider is how your character sees the world, or others. What's their view of society, authority and wealth. Are they open and welcoming, closed and shy, arrogant and superior?    

Physical appearance

It's possible to get this far into character creation without knowing how old, what species or even what gender your character is. It's not likely, but possible. So if you haven't figured that part out yet, this is a good time to do it.   That's however not everything for your character's appearance. There are several things to think about such as hair or fur color, eye color, skin color, height, weight, facial features etc. Does your character have high cheekbones? A crooked nose? Are their lips unusually large or small? Do they have thick arms or a very short legs? Are they tattooed? Are they scarred? Do they have an odd limp?   At the very least once you're done with this section you should know if your character is large, small, short or tall and what their hair, eye and skin color is. Read the descriptions for your character's species to help inspire you.
Kavor is a huge man. He's not only unusually tall, but he's also quite obese but with great physical strength. Adi also wants him to be a bit of a social dumdum and have a bad case of body-odor. He does have a heart of gold, however.
 

Conclusion and connections

There we go! There's our character backstory and a solid foundation to stand on. With these six questions, we've gotten several follow-up questions that helped us shape our character's backstory, see him grow up and what has shaped him. At this point we can either move on to the next session, or continue asking questions to further flesh our character out. If you're truly into fleshing out your backstory, there are a lot of resources online for you to continue working.   Now that you've got a backstory, have your GM read it. Not only does this help her shape the adventures up ahead, but it also lets her come with input for things that might not gel well with what she has planned.  

The Mentor

Before we move on to the stats of the character, we must fulfill the requirements listed at the very beginning: The connections! Pick one person from the character's backstory who has been or still is imporant to them. It could be someone who has had a big impact on your character's life, like a mentor.  

The Rival

On the other end of the spectrum is the Rival. A person from your character's history that has been a thorn in the character's side. Someone who has been something of a nemesis or rival of your character.  

Party relationships

Whether you do this now or later, you should take some time and work with the other players to figure out what relationships your characters have. Ideally, you should have a relationship of some form to at least two other characters in the party.  
Kavor, having grown up in the slums of Skaska Waterfront and made his living as a mechanic fixing cars, appliances and weapons for the local goon gangs, is a skilled mechanic. Adi, Kavor's player, picks his sister as an influential and important person and his cousin as his rival. Adi works together with the rest of the group to find relations to the other player characters, making one of them the rich woman who Kavor is a driver for, and another is a returning customer.
 

Character starting skills and traits

The GM sets a starter experience level for all the characters in the campaign, depending on what she needs. This "starter level" determines how many skills and traits your character can have and is a useful tool for the GM to tweak the style of campaign. The groups of Average, Skilled, Superb and Legend represent increasing amounts of experience at the start of the adventure. Each group gets a different amount of skills and traits.   In the top row, the column headers list each base experience level and each row below that determine your Traits Value and how many skills of each competency level you get. Skills are granted in four levels: +2 to +8. If you've already looked through CD10 Core: Skills, you know how these work. They represent your ability with a skill. A skill at +2 is a hobbyist skill, while a +6 skill is professional level skill.
STARTING SKILL LEVELS
Average
Skilled
Superb
Legend
Traits
2
4
6
8
+2 skills
4
6
8
10
+4 skills
2
3
4
5
+6 skills
0
1
2
3
+8 skills
0
0
0
1
Character experience is just a descriptor for indicating the average skill and experience of the character at character creation. We do not track "levels", like for instance DnD, and your character do not increase in distinct levels through gameplay. Once character creation is done, your starting experience is irrelevant and the level is not noted on the character sheet. Most characters, unless the GM decides otherwise, should use start at Skilled.

If the GM wants the players to have a bit of a head start on things she can have them created at a higher experience point. The Average is generally used for creating NPCs.

 

A character created as a Skilled character will have a Traits value of 4, meaning they can only pick a total of 4 negative traits and the total sum of their traits when added together may not exceed +4. They also get 6 skills at +2 skill level, 3 skills at +4 and 1 skill at +6.

 

[Advanced] Abilities

If you are running a game with any of the modules providing additional abilities, then you should pick these before you move on. Be it magic, mutations or psionics, get them out of the way first.  

Choose your Traits

A character can theoretically possess any number of traits as there is no hard cap on how many traits you can have. At character creation, however, a character is limited in two ways: They may only have a maximum number of negative traits and the total sum of their traits (not counting traits from species) may not exceed the value in the "Traits" row on the character starter level table.   If that value is "4", then your character may only have 4 negative traits total (not counting species traits) and when calculating their total traits values together (again, not counting species traits) the sum of all traits may not exceed +4. If a character is Superb, these numbers both change to 6 negative traits and a total sum of +6.  

Traits from species

A species in CD10 is defined by a set of traits and abilities. These traits are separate from the traits the player chooses for their character and while they can be altered by the player, they should not do so without good reason. By doing so they alter the maximum value of their other picked traits.   If, for instance, a player wants to play a Dru'un but not be Ugly. His character is created as a Skilled character, so his Trait value number is 4. Now, to get rid of Ugly he must "pay" two points to raise the trait from -2 to 0. This means that when he calculates his total trait sum, he is no longer limited to a sum of +4, but +2, since he already paid two points to remove his species trait. This holds true for lowering traits as well. Say the player wants to remove Hound-nose from his character, he then gains a point and his total would then raise from +4 to +5. Any trait changes to the species traits work this way.
Dulzuun starting traits
Big
+3
+2
-3
Eye Defect (Near-sighted)
-4
-3
Iron Physique (Everything)
+1
+3
-2

If a player doesn't change his species' traits, he can ignore them for all his calculations. Please note that even if you remove negative traits from your species' traits, you cannot add more negative traits to your character than your starting level allows.

 

Picking Traits

Picking traits should be done with your character's physical and mental characteristics in mind. Pull from your background story to find traits that describe your character. Traits are deviations from a norm, so try and find things that define your character in one way or another.  
Drenka is created as a Skilled level character, so she may only have 4 negative traits and when she has calculated all of her traits together, she may not have a total trait value above 4. She lists her traits as follows:
Kuna starting traits
Big
+1
Eye Defect (Color blind)
-2
Eye Defect (Near-sighted)
-3
+3
Ability
Ability
Her total value when adding all traits together ends up being (3+2+2+2+2+3)-(3+2+2+3)=4 and she does not have more than 4 negative traits. She is also a Kuna, so she adds her racial traits as well. But since she doesn't want to be Big, she reduces it to 0 and so her allowed total is now +5. To fill the gap, she raises Unapproachable to -1.
 
Adi imagines Kavor as a social dumdum, big, somewhat dim, friendly, huge and a bit fat. She picks the following traits:
Brave +1, Carefree +2, Friendly +3, Strong +2, Iron Physique (Injury) +3, Butterfingers -2, Fat -2, Socially Inept -2, Ugly -2.   Kavor also gains the following traits from being a Kuna:   Big +1, Hound-Nose +3, Sharp-eared +2, Swift +3, Color-blind -2, Nearsighted -3, Latent Gelsir -4.
 

Choose your Skills

According to your character's level, pick skills that makes sense from your character's background and life goal. It is usually easier to just pick out the skills first then choose which ones are +2, +4 or +6 level, rather than trying to pick that immediately. Go through the skills list, pick a bunch of skills you want and that fits with your background, then decide which ones you want to be good at.   If your character has abilities that require purchasing with XP, you may substitute a +2 skill for 3 experience points, a +4 skill for 10 experience points or a +6 skill for 21 points. Abilities are listed in their respective advanced module. For instance CD10 Abilities: Psionics for psionic abilities.  
Kavor grew up in the slums of Skaska Waterfront and has done of business with the local goons and spends most of his spare time drinking in the local bar. Adi picks the following skills for Kavor:   Bluffing +2, Gambling +2, Intimidation +2, Shady Dealings +2, Shotguns +2, Brawl +4, Driving +4, Mechanics +6, Drinking +4, Urban Survival +2
 

Property, wealth and gear

Finally you need to equip your character. First, add up the values of the traits Status and Riches (or Poor alternatively). You have a base amount of funds on your or on your person and can purchase equipment for an additional sum of money. The additional sum cannot be converted to in-hand funds post creation, so spend them wisely! Also take note that a character without any traits that affect it, can only carry 12 Kg of gear on their body or risk becoming encumbered in combat.   The number under "average income" is a suggested target level for your monthly income from work, stocks or other sources. You should come up with a narrative way of how your character makes that kind of money, be it employment, freelance work, criminal activities etc.  

Below follows an example table of different income levels from Cinders of the Cataclysm. You can create your own table to fit your own world.

 
Trait Value Starting Wealth Starting Equipment Living Standards Rent Avg Income Other
-4
100 Cr
0 Cr
Streets
0 Cr
0 Cr
Ragged clothing.
-3
200 Cr
500 Cr
Abandoned Building
200 Cr
400 Cr
Rough clothing.
-2
300 Cr
1000 Cr
Slum Apartment
400 Cr
600 Cr
Decent clothing.
-1
400 Cr
2 000 Cr
Rundown Apartment
600 Cr
800 Cr
-
0
500 Cr
4 000 Cr
Basic Resiblock
800 Cr
1 500 Cr
-
+1
1 000 Cr
8 000 Cr
Decent Resiblock
1 200 Cr
2 200 Cr
-
+2
2 000 Cr
10 000 Cr
Fine Apartment
2 000 Cr
3 200 Cr
-
+3
4 000 Cr
15 000 Cr
Luxury Apartment
3 500 Cr
5 000 Cr
Basic model car. Loan Ceil. 10 000 Cr.
+4
10 000 Cr
40 000 Cr
Penthouse
5 500 Cr
8 000 Cr
Fine model car. Loan Ceil. 20 000 Cr.
+5
10 000 Cr
60 000 Cr
Penthouse
5 500 Cr
8 000 Cr
Fine model car. Loan Ceil. 20 000 Cr.
+6
15 000 Cr
80 000 Cr
Luxury Block Flat
8 000 Cr
14 000 Cr
Fine model car. Loan Ceil. 50 000 Cr.
+7
35 000 Cr
160 000 Cr
VoH Apartment
18 000 Cr
28 000 Cr
Private Hover. Loan Ceil. 200 000 Cr.
+8
50 000 Cr
300 000 Cr
VoH Luxury Apartment
20 000 Cr
40 000 Cr
Private Hover. Loan Ceil. 500 000 Cr.
 

Age and death

A character who sticks around for a long time may eventually grow old. When the character passes the threshold for old age for their species (see the species description) the character must make a check against +3 difficulty per 5 years beyond the threshold and can use any applicable physical trait, such as Iron Physique, Strong, Feeble or Sickly for the check.   Should the check fail, the character gains the trait Old -1 and will age according to the trait's description.  

Death

Living an adventurous life is dangerous and even if one does not die violently on an adventure, age will inevitably claim us all. A character's death should be role-played and be a focused scene for people to enjoy. The death-scene should leave everyone, including the player whose character died, with a memorable experience.   If a character dies in battle it should be a glorious and dramatic death, such as fighting to the bitter end and shouting a scathing insult at the foe who dealt the killing blow. If the character is fataly injured the coming death scene should be role-played as the character is surrounded by their adventurous companions and perhaps friends and family, to say their final goodbyes.   A character who reaches Old -5 must, before the next gaming session, decide on a good death scene for their character, which should also involve every other party member as well as what friends and family the character has. Make it memorable!   Once the death scene has been played out the player should think about what to do next. Some leave the game entirely, but if that's not what they want, they should figure out what new character they want and also think about what happens to the character's possessions and wealth. If the character had childrens, they likely inherited what was owned by the character. The new character could be a child of the old character and therefore inherit some, or all, of their wealth, if any.   Pay close attention to inheritance rules within the setting. Party members looting the dead corpse may just be illegal.



Cover image: by Mizeo

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