Tridian Cartography

Since space has 3 dimensions (as well as the temporal dimension), galactic cartography uses the Tridian coordinate system, as opposed to the the traditional 2-dimensional coordinate system used on planets. Coordinates are written as such: (c,d,p), where c is the distance around the circular plane of the galaxy (sectors) from 0, d is the distance outward from the core (rings), and p is the planar distance from the central plane of the galaxy (levels). 3-dimensional regions of the galaxy where all three of these regional divisions intersect are dubbed blocks, and written as c.d.p where c is the sector, d is the ring, and p is the planar level.

Galactic Map

Lateral Coordinates

Galactic Sectors.png
The galactic disk, shown here in 2-dimensional format (planar coordination is absent), is divided by radial lines into four lateral quadrants, each of which is divided into six sectors. Lateral coordinates are used to designate the position of any given point relative to the radial line "zero", which originates from Apocalypse (as all latitude lines do) and intersects the Pendulum system (as well as the hypothetical original location of the Aehrworld). The sectors are sometimes colloquially nicknamed for the most prominent star system within that sector.

In the lateral sense, vector direction or position relative to a point is given as either spinward (counterclockwise along the galactic disk, usually from zero) or antispinward (clockwise along the galactic disk).

Elliptical Coordinates

The circular (or elliptical), lateral disk of the galaxy is divided into rings about 15000 lc thick. These rings, called elliptical coordinate designations, are numbered outwards from Apocalypse (which is the core apex point). Elliptical coordinates are used to designate the position of any given point relative to the core point of the galactic disk (determined to be Doomsday). The individual rings are not named officially, but they are grouped into regions (most of which are pairs).

Ring Regions (from Apocalpyse outwards):

Galactic Rings.png
  • Apocalpyse - the very heart of the galaxy; a supermassive black hole that is largely responsible for the spiral shape of the Orranysis galaxy. Uninhabited.
  • Core Radiofield - the unmanageably high, lethal extent of the cumulative radiation of Orranysis' galactic core. Extends from Apocalypse to roughly Ring 2. Uninhabited except by Xalnrites, insofar as known.
  • Core Halo - the innermost section of the inhabited Orranysis galaxy; generally relocation worlds with system radiation barriers. Extends from Ring 2 to Ring 4. Inhabited.
  • Inner Rim - the inner band of Orranysis' galactic disk. Extends from Ring 4 to Ring 6. Inhabited.
  • Midrim - the middle band of Orranysis' galactic disk. Extends from Ring 4 to Ring 8. Inhabited.
  • The Coast - the outer edge (or "coast") of Orranysis; often at the far reach of the law. Extends from Ring 8 to Ring 10. Inhabited.
  • Deep Space - fairly self-explanatory; almost totally devoid of any cohesive matter up to the edges of the nearest galaxies. Extends from Ring 10 outwards. Inhabited, though barely so.

In the elliptical sense, vector direction or position relative to a point is given as either coreward (inwards to the center of the galactic disk) or rimward (outwards from the core of the galactic disk).

Planar Coordinates

Planar Regions.png
There is a third coordinate measure used in navigation: planarity. Planar coordinates are used to designate the position of any given point relative to the 'central' plane of the galactic disk (which intersects Doomsday). Planes, also known as levels, are numbered (successively higher outwards) either negative (subplanar) or positive (superplanar) in regards to where they are relative to the base plane. The levels are not named officially or grouped into regions.

In the planar sense, vector direction or position relative to a point is given as either subplanar ('below' the base plane) or superplanar ('above' the base plane).

Misconceptions

Contrary to the name, the Anomaly Sector (AnSec) is not an entire sector of the galaxy. It is actually an irregular patch of space, approximately the area of a sector, that is restricted and generally avoided. The Anomaly Sector spans the outer edge of several sectors.


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